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I found this really interesting website the other day and thought I would post it here for people to check out. It has a great deal of information about how to pick out a good dog food for your dog. What I am going to do is print it out and show it to my vet to see what she has to say about the whole thing. There is so much information out there about dog foods that it is really hard to know what is the best dog food for your dog.



The Dog Food Project
 

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I found this really interesting website the other day and thought I would post it here for people to check out. It has a great deal of information about how to pick out a good dog food for your dog. What I am going to do is print it out and show it to my vet to see what she has to say about the whole thing. There is so much information out there about dog foods that it is really hard to know what is the best dog food for your dog.
The Dog Food Project[/b]

Better than most must still not without mythical gobblins not based on fact

Seen the <a href="http://www.wysong.net/faqpets.shtml#fooled%5b/url" target="_blank"> by Wysong. who does have a "dog in the fight so to speak" the concept that heat is bad is light on signigficant research and that which is done as come down on the side of eliminating pathogen greatly out ways any losses cause. There is no real evidence that so called "enzymes" are of any real nutrional value, that said the rest of the info is general spot on.

Are by-Products bad</a>
" Whole Dog and others in the pet food marketplace pushing the "no by-products" claim seem unaware of the fact that “by-product” is a mere word invention. It creates a negative connotation but has nothing to do with health or nutrition. Health and nutrition are not about superficial impressions created by word labels. Feeding just muscle meats to pets is a serious error since no carnivore in the wild eats such a diet. If they did, they would become diseased from doing so. In fact, carnivores often prefer the non-muscle meat parts of their prey that are labeled “by-products.” Critics of by-products evidently feel food animals have no inherent merit and that they should be raised, slaughtered, and then everything but their “prime meat” should go to a landfill.

...Just because something is not “human grade” does not mean it is not healthy or nutritious. For example, chicken viscera is not “human grade,” but carries more nutritional value than a clean white chicken breast. Americans think that chicken feet would not be fit for human consumption, but many far eastern countries relish them. On the other hand, “human grade” beef steaks fed to pets could cause serious nutritional imbalances and disease if fed exclusively. Pet foods that create the superficial perception of quality (no by-products, USDA, human grade, etc.) with the intent of getting pet owners to feed a particular food exclusively is not what health is about.

There are also the larger concerns of the Earth’s dwindling food resources and swelling population. Should “human grade” food products be, so to speak, taken out of the mouths of people and fed to pets with all of the excellent nutritional non-“human grade” ingredients put in the garbage?

Think about the humane aspect of converting all pet food to “human grade.” Millions of tons of pet foods are produced each year. Should cows, pigs, sheep, fish, chickens and other sentient creatures be raised and slaughtered for these foods? Or should the perfectly good and nutritious by-products from human meat processing be used rather than wasted? Why would caring and sensitive pet owners want other creatures-- that are themselves capable of being pets-- needlessly raised in factory farm confinement and slaughtered when alternative sources of excellent nutrition from animals that have already been slaughtered are available?"

[url="http://www.wysong.net/controversies/rate_your_dog_food.shtml"]Wysong Critique of Rate Your Dog Food List?

) For every listing of "by-product", subtract 10 points
(There is no scientific evidence that the components of food animals that are called “by-products” are dangerous or inferior nutritionally to muscle meat. In fact, since they include elements of various parts of the body such as organs, tendons, ligaments, and trimmings, they are usually superior. Are we to throw such nutritionally superior foods away because of a myth, and waste valuable food resources?)

2) For every non-specific animal source
("meat" or "poultry", meat, meal or fat) reference, subtract 10 points
(This is a perpetuation of the myth promoted by Whole Dog Journal. First of all, there would be no reason for a manufacturer to hide this information. That aside, naming the specific animal a meat comes from is of little health or nutritional value. If the concern is food sensitivity or allergy, then the cause—feeding one food meal after meal—should most certainly not be promoted as this list does. Wysong Response to Whole Dog Journal)



Also keep in mind that using generic name for a meat than a more specific on on the label gives the pet food manufacture more fexibility which can keep cost down. If it can formulate a product with say beef or chicken it can chose wich on based on cost if using a generic meat rather than the specific meat.

<a href="http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/46/4/539.pdf" target="_blank">THE EFFECTS OF HEAT ON THE NUTRITIVE
VALUE OF PROTEIN HYDROLYSATES WITH DEXTROSE</a>

Lysine Content in Canine Diets Can Be Severely Heat Damaged1–3,

Nutritional changes in proteins during heat processing

Heat Processing Changes the Protein Quality of Canned Cat Foods as Measured with a Rat Bioassay

<a href="http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/reprint/39/3/413.pdf" target="_blank">THE NUTRITIONAL EFFECTS OF HEAT OX FOOD
PROTEINS, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO COMMERCIAL PROCESSING AND HOME
COOKING</a>
"During these heating processes the digestibility of the pro
teins of sunflower seed meal, cottonseed flour and corn was
definitely decreased by amounts ranging from 2.5 to 14.2 per
centage units. The biological value of the proteins of pea
nut meal, sunflower seed meal, and cottonseed flour was also
definitely decreased in these processes.
The percentage of total heat damage was highest for corn
(20) and peanut meal (18), intermediate for sunflower seed
flour (10) and cottonseed flour (11) ; no heat damage was
demonstrated in the roasting of beef. For flaxseed (linseed),
heat exerted a favorable effect on protein utilization (!%},
especially evident in improved protein digestibility."

Study on the Nutritional Value of Raw, Dehulled, Autoclaved, Cooked and Enzyme Supplemented to Raw Yellow Peas on Performance of Broiler Chicks
"In conclusion autoclaving, cocking and dehulling of
yellow peas improve feed conversion rate, increase body
weight gain in broiler but autoclaving gives better results
and addition of enzyme to 20% whole raw peas
containing diet had no beneficial effect."


Heating meat based protein reduces nutrional marginally some plant based heat reduces nutrional value while for others it increaes it. Adding enzymes has not shown any nutrional effect,

Is Cooked Food Poison?
"Anecdotal evidence also suggests (no peer-reviewed research is available on the issue, to our knowledge) that those eating 100% raw foods do not appear to be any healthier on average than people eating predominantly raw, and that raw diets are not the only diets that may work."
 
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