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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

For those of you who have intact males, do you have any issues with them getting bullied or attacked by other dogs? Are you able to take them for walks without having to worry about their safety? I read somewhere that intact males become a target for other males, especially neutered ones. If I got a male, I would want to leave him intact (personal choice) but Id want to make sure he’d be able to safely go on walks or hikes without becoming a target for other dogs.

Lastly, would you say an intact basset would have an issue with trying to escape to get to a female in heat?
 

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Lastly, would you say an intact basset would have an issue with trying to escape to get to a female in heat?
YES. I know of an intact male basset that chewed/clawed his way through a hollow core bedroom door in an attempt to get to a bitch in heat.



BTW I don't know the laws where you live but where I live you are responsible (county/village fines and possible owner suit) if your intact male gets loose and father's a litter.
 

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No. In fact it's the CASTRATED males that can find themselves targetted by entire males because those males don't know whatl the castrated male is, in terms of gender!!



" I read somewhere that intact males become a target for other males, especially neutered ones"


Confused.com? If a dog has been neutered (castrated), he's NOT intact!!


Most male Bassets are just fine if left entire, in terms of relationship with other entire males :D Unlike Terriers, Bassets are not usually naturally aggressive even if they won't fight back, if pushed :rolleyes:



I suppose some males might try to get out after a local bitch in season, but if he's properly contained, and not left alone for hours (!) so he gets bored, you should have NO problem with your male if you leave him as nature intended. We kept entire males (and my current boy is unaltered) with our entire bitches (until they were retired, when they were spayed) with only minimal angst. The bitches were kept well away from the others when in season. Yes we were jumping gates and barriers, which was more upsetting for us, then for our boys.


If a male picks up the trail left by a local bitch in season, he may be 'switched on', but that has never happene with our boys - maybe because we lived in the country or local bitch-owners, had them spayed!!
 

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when it comes to male male aggression it usual occurs between two intact males. and then the ones it is most likely a problem is intact males in the same household with intact bitches because fighting because access to breed.


as far as how driven an intact male is regarding females in season is very individulistic. some males lose the ability to think if there is one in a 5 mile radius and others have no problem even if they are in a neighboring kennel


FWIW there evidence suggest it is healthier especially longterm for males to remain intact. Bitches on the other hand is not clear cut there is strong case to be made for either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thank you for your responses! I apologize if my question was confusing. What I meant was, I have read that neutered (casterated/not intact) males have been apparently known to attack intact males (not neutered). Something about the hormones setting the neutered males off. I wouldn’t want to be walking my intact dog and have a random dog attack him.

I have just been weighing the pros and cons of a female versus a male. It seems that keeping males intact is healthier (that is the personal conclusion I have come to anyways... it’s fine if you disagree), but females can be spayed without much issue (true?)

I appreciate all of your perspectives, advise and sharing of your experiences.
 

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nope other way round if anything unless the reason for neutering was male/male aggression to begin with.


Surgery on females is more traumatic than Males and is not without risk. I would recommend not spay female until maturity ie 2 years of age or only remove uterus but not ovaries. New Report on Complication Rates for Neutering Surgery in Dogs and Cats | The SkeptVet chance of death is twice as great in Female dogs from sterilization than cats or male dogs. sometimes this death is not immediate. Know of one dog that had fatal kidney problems following spays surgery because of damage done to ureters .

https://www.americanveterinarian.co...-differences-in-neutered-and-intact-male-dogs

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/...utering-causes-behavior-problems-in-male-dogs

https://openventio.org/Volume2-Issu...uestionnaires-and-Case-Studies-VMOJ-2-113.pdf


i have come across some articles that sort of imply what you are asking about but from what is see it is a complete miss understanding of what is going on example
https://thelabradorforum.com/thread...ered-dogs-to-my-intact-1-year-old-help.17815/
"Manny, who is approaching 1 year old in mid February. He is an exceedingly friendly and entirely non-aggressive dog; his slightly imbecilic enthusiasm as a younger puppy, where he would charge over to all and sundry and heap attention and energy, even where not entirely reciprocated, has now given way to a far more measured and sensible approach with what, seems to me, an appropriate level of 'decorum' and polite caution. However, over the last six weeks or so he has been receiving increasing levels of aggression, including bark, snapping and, on occasion, genuine attempts to bite him, from a range of dogs, virtually all of whom are neutered males."


and the responses are clueless, ans is the owner. IT is because the Puppy is not behaving in an appropriate manner and is being disciplined by older dogs. see;

http://labrescueblog.blogspot.com/2010/02/puppy-license-and-its-loss.html
Puppies up to 4 ½ to 5 months of age appear to have something called a ‘puppy license’ – something that allows them to be an absolute pest to older dogs without repercussion. You see puppies being down right rude in dog terms doing things like jumping on older dogs, stealing food and toys from adults, barking right in the face of an adult or worse still humping them – and the adults just seem to put up with it, and even expect it – at least well socialised dogs do (dogs with good dog communication and social skills).

However at about this age the license expires as the puppies hormone levels change and they develop psychologically. Adult dogs now start to insist on the puppy controlling their behaviour and being more respectful in their interactions – and this comes as a shock to many puppies who ignore the more subtle signs until an adult dog (maybe their best pal at home, a friend at the park or a total stranger) snaps back – figuratively and sometimes literally. The adult dogs might:

· Bark (roar) at an adolescent displaying inappropriate behaviour.

· Plant the adolescent’s face into the dirt with a well placed paw (something my boy was doing to other younger and over the top puppies at only 12 weeks of age – and which caused some distress until I figured out what was going on).

· Knock the adolescent with their muzzle or mouth.

· Snap at them.
 

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What I meant was, I have read that neutered (casterated/not intact) males have been apparently known to attack intact males (not neutered). Something about the hormones setting the neutered males off. I wouldn’t want to be walking my intact dog and have a random dog attack him.

I have just been weighing the pros and cons of a female versus a male. It seems that keeping males intact is healthier (that is the personal conclusion I have come to anyways... it’s fine if you disagree), but females can be spayed without much issue (true?)

I don't know what you have been reading, but, again, it's most often, if at all, that entire dogs may target (not necessarily attack!) a castrated male as what they are isn't necessarily obvious to the other dog.


Our bitches were always spayed on retirement (at least). I wanted my Whippet spayed by around 6 months as she was only a pet and my elderly entire male didn't want a bitch in season ANYWHERE locally. My vet refused, saying he'd prefer her to have one season first. I left it to around 11 months at which point there was still no sign of her coming in, and took her back - he operated and she's fine. He cited the possibility of bone development problems/spay incontinence if spayed early.


I preferred to have my brood bitches spayed by around 7 years, mainly so they didn't need to confined twice a year and upsetting the males, but also because there is enough evidence for me to think the more seasons a bitch is allowed to have, the greater the risk of a female cancer. We only had one, spayed around 8, who developed mammary cancer into her 13th year.


Whether you go for a male or female, is your decision of course. I have always found the males to be more 'typey' - more wrinkle, bone etc.etc. Coupled with once adult, my males have been more into ME, than the usually more independent-minded females. But that's in general - each hound is an individual!
 

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I preferred to have my brood bitches spayed by around 7 years, mainly so they didn't need to confined twice a year and upsetting the males, but also because there is enough evidence for me to think the more seasons a bitch is allowed to have, the greater the risk of a female cancer. We only had one, spayed around 8, who developed mammary cancer into her 13th year.
fwiw there is an increase risk in mammary cancer past the second heat cycle in studies but the risk increase was not statistically significant. That is not enough evidence the increased risk was not just a random aberration of the data however pyometra always increases the more heat cycles a dog has because of the hormonal changes of false pregnancy has on the uterus of dogs https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/pyometra-in-dogs

Spaying a bitch that is not longer part of a breeding program makes a lot of sense Because of the effect of false pregnancy on the uterus it is why most repro vets recommend breeding dogs early and on every heat cycle then spay. OF course this is counter to being able to prove the Bitches conformation in the breed ring before breeding.
 

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it is why most repro vets recommend breeding dogs early and on every heat cycle then spay. OF course this is counter to being able to prove the Bitches conformation in the breed ring before breeding.

Because the UK KC won't accept registration of a litter from the same bitch within a 12 month period, mating on every heat can't be done. However I knew of an American-bred bitch whose owners had a hard time getting in whelp so when they finally did, they bred her again on her next season. We can, however, show a spayed bitch, with permission from the KC.
 

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here spayed bitches only at specialties in veterans class when there is no chance going for group or Bis Trying to get the same exemption for field trial class because spayed/neutered allowed in field trials

"UK KC won't accept registration of a litter from the same bitch within a 12 month period" the problem with such regulations is they are all about appearance and not substance . and never change fast enough to keep up with new and better information and practices.
 

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I currently have an unaltered male that is 1 1/2 years old. He gets in fights with everything. My mom has two fixed large dogs but my 38 lb boy starts crap with hers and ends up on the bottom fighting for his life. When he was a puppy, he loved them. I’ve been bit by my dog twice trying to break them up. He is an absolute sweetie to people.

In all honestly he became more aggressive after I got a female. He doesn’t seem to mind her beating him up, my gosh they play rough!
 

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"UK KC won't accept registration of a litter from the same bitch within a 12 month period"

the problem with such regulations is they are all about appearance and not substance . and never change fast enough to keep up with new and better information and practices.

This was done, quite rightly, to try to stop the OVERBREEDING of bitches by Puppy Farmers/BYBs who often registered their litters, to produce more income (ask more for a KC Registered puppy). This rule was most certainly NOT to do with appearance. Not to say that as registration is taken on trust, those unscrupulous breeders wouldn't put a false name on the dam of a litter - and did!
 

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Breeding every heat cycle is best for the bitches health and reproductive health any thing that prevents that is done because of the "perception" of over breeding plain and simple.
 

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Breeding every heat cycle is best for the bitches health and reproductive health any thing that prevents that is done because of the "perception" of over breeding plain and simple.

So you are suggesting that it's 'healthier' for a bitch who has maybe produced 9 or 10 puppies from her last heat, to be put in whelp again? Sorry, I simply cannot agree with that. The American bitch I recall being used like this, only had a couple of puppies from the previous season and there is just about a good enough excuse for putting her in whelp again immediately. Otherwise no way would I do that to any of mine, and never did. In fact the one I took down to an American dog, from Toronto, which only did produce 2 puppies, one DOA, I left to have another season before going down for a repeat mating, a year + later.


Again this KC rule was made to STOP Puppy Farmers from doing exactly that - breeding from their poor bitches on EVERY season until they were worn out. The Shelter I Home Check for rescues such bitches and they come in with teats dragging on the floor (Bassets and other low-slung dogs). Tragic. How in the world can THAT be 'healthy'? My perception of such breeding practices is one of horror.
 
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