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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday Ostars my two and half year old bassett started having problems peeing. She was asking to go out every 15-20 minutes. Then last night while she was laying chewing her chewy she peed herself. I thought she has urinary infection (which she has had two in the past) and took her to the ER. They checked her urine and it was fine. Blood work and xrays came back ok also. Doctor thinks she has incontience and put her on Clavamox and DES. The doctor thinks she may have to be on DES the rest of her life. I am concerned on putting a young dog on meds for the rest of her life. Any one have any ideas about anything natural to help?
 

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Did he give her the Clavamox because he thinks she might have a urinary tract infection that isn't showing up in the tests? If you don't feel comfortable about the DES longterm, maybe a second opinion would be in order.

I hope Ostars is feeling better today- let us know how she's doing-
 

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The doctor thinks she may have to be on DES the rest of her life
Hormone replacement is not without long term risks. Talk to the vet about Proin. PPA which is the active ingredient in proin was removed from the market place because of increased in risk of a particular type of stroke in young women. However dogs do not seem to get this type of stroke and after years of after market compounding etc there is FDA for PPA for use in dogs. There seems to be far less side effect from PPA than DES and those that do occur are far less severe. It is alo quite effective. I have a beagle that has been on PPA in one form or another for the past 10 years.

Phenylpropanolamine (Propagest, Pro-In)
 

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Incontinence must surely be quite unusual in such a young Basset!

We once had a Basset who wanted to pee much more often than normal and sometimes she would do little drops of wee and often would squat down for ages and it was discovered she had bladder stones that apparently move around and can block the tube that the wee comes out of, hence the time spent squatting down and not much coming out.

Presumably your vet has checked for bladders stones, some of which can be quite tiny and some may be jagged in appearance and can damage the bladder wall leading to tiny spots of blood in the urine, which you would notice on a path but not on grass!
 

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Incontinence must surely be quite unusual in such a young Basset!
Unfortunately it is one of the negative consequences of spaying. both my female beagles developed it even earlier than noted here , while not common it is not unheard of.



actual the most common form of stones in female dogs is cause by uti Infection the infection comes first the crystal and stones second.

Canine Struvite Bladder Stones
85% of patients with struvite bladder stones are female
...Bacteria capable of digesting urea are called “urease positive” bacteria and in most cases we are talking about Staphylococci. In the dog, the general rule is: No infection, no bladder stone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Feeling better

First Ostara is doing better. Saw her regular doctor yesterday who looked inside her. Ostara's insides was red and swollen. She said that with Ostara urine is pooling inside while she is sleeping and that is what is causing her inflamation that makes her want to pee all the time. Doctor says this happens to 1 in 5 spayed female dogs. So right now she is on the antibotics and the DES. She will be on the DES for the rest of her life but the doctor wants to start with 1 a week to see how she does. Right now she is feeling much better and is loving all the attention Mom and Dad is giving her. With Ostara it is all about the treats.
 

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Unfortunately it is one of the negative consequences of spaying. both my female beagles developed it even earlier than noted here , while not common it is not unheard of.



We adopted Layla a 1 1/2 yr old female two weeks ago. She was spayed 3 days before we adopted her. Over the past couple weeks we've been having problems with her having accidents/urinating inappropriately in the house. We took her to the vet to see if she had a UTI. He gave us Clavamox to treat a possible UTI (He wasn't able to aspirate a urine sample and we were unable to collect one due to the fact Layla almost touches the ground when she goes.) He said if she did have a UTI we should see improvement in a few days. The accidents have continued. We've tried to crate her but she still has accidents in the crate. There is never very much urine when she has her accidents. Just wondering if two weeks would be too early to see issues with hormone related incontinence. She goes back to the vet next week to have some blood work and hopefully a urinalysis.
 

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Just wondering if two weeks would be too early to see issues with hormone related incontinence.
FWIW 2 weeks would be very early for hormonal related incontinence and with spay incontinence my experience has not be with a litttle pee in a lot of places but simple a large volume of pee where the dog was sleeping. The loss of control occurs when there is less voluntary control i.e. exclusively while sleeping
 

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Well maybe a bit more information would be useful. We got her in Michigan, stayed with our family there, and then came to our home in Illinois. I go to school in southern Illinois and my wife works in central Illinois, so we have two homes the dogs go to at the moment (one during the week, the other on weekends). She had a few accidents over the first two days we had her in Michigan - we assumed to be expected in a new place with three unfamiliar dogs. She quickly picked up on the housetraining though, and seemed to be letting us know when she had to go out.

We only had her in the central IL house for a night but there were no accidents. Then I took her to the school house and had her there for close to two weeks. Over the first few days she was alright - she had one or two accidents, one of which was my fault for not realizing she had to go out, and the other my roommate's fault because he is kind of an idiot when it comes to dogs. However after a week she began to really have accidents all the time, and it seemed like we needed to take her out once every couple of hours to avoid her peeing in the house.

We took her to the vet as I described before and hadn't really seen any big improvements since. Most of her accidents are small - less than a cup of urine I would say - and the ones in the crate I am sometimes uncertain if she has peed or just drooled a lot from the chew bones I give her (she drools a lot). The larger bouts of urination she mostly seems to release when she goes outside. There is little to no odor when she pees in the house and her urine looks pretty clear when I can see it outside, and there are no blood flecks or anything else.

I know there is a lot to digest here - my wife's and my own schedule is a bit hectic right now because of the multiple house issue (which will be resolved in about a month, when we will all be living together under the same roof). I would not be surprised if Layla's issues are mostly behavioral - she suffers a bit from separation anxiety and will sometimes bark a lot when I leave (either in her crate or in my bedroom with the door closed). The owners who gave her up for adoption apparently left her outside all day and then kept her in their kitchen at night, so she may not have ever been properly housetrained to begin with. I have begun training her by rewarding her when she eliminates outside but I know there is a lot to be done.

At this point I just want to make sure there aren't any underlying health issues that I am working against as well as behavioral ones. As I said before we are scheduled to have some blood work done to test for a variety of issues that might be contributing, and I've read some of the other comments in this post that have talked about kidney or bladder stones. Any other suggestions for what to ask the vet about? It sounds as though incontinence may not be the issue.

Thanks!
 

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I did a little research and found statistics that showed 1 in 5 that were spayed after their first heat cycle, but it is 1 in 10 if spayed before.

they also noted that larger and heavier dogs had a higher rate of incontinence after spaying then smaller dogs.
 
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