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Just wanted to introduce myself. My name is Michael. I am 21 years old and recently bought a Basset Hound named Grant. Grant is 7 weeks old and I am trying to crate/housetrain him.

Also, He nips/bites and when you scold him he just gets more aggressive. I was just curious if any of you could give me some pointers for either subject? Thank you.
 

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Hello Michael
I'm Katy and new, too. We can be new together and figure out the board. Hope you have a Good 2006

[ January 07, 2006, 03:50 PM: Message edited by: Katy-Ann ]
 
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The first few weeks are tough with a puppy. Byron used to nip, but he grew out of that (he's eight months now). When he nips, stop petting him and walk away; he'll AS for housetraining, be consistent and very observent. When you can't keep a close eye on grant, put him in his crate. Crate him for about a half hour after he eats. Then, take him out right away. Keep some treats in your pocket, and when he goes potty outside give him a treat and give him lots of praise.

We'd love to see pictures! Welcome and good luck!
 

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Welcome to a wonderful group of lunatics. (you'll understand what I mean in a couple of months) Bassets are fabulous, funny and delightful 99% of the time. It's that 1% which will have you questioning your sanity.
This site is a great resource.
 
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Welcome Michael....We have something in common, My name is Grant.... and I have never heard of a dog named Grant.....Good taste in names LOL
 

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Hello and welcome to the group! I love the name Grant, what a cool name!
 

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The following are the links I ussual suggest

housetraining
Housetraining Your Puppy
" 12 wk puppy who is busy playing may need to urinate every 15-20 minutes, whereas a resting puppy might go for an hour, and a sleeping puppy can go 8 hours at night. Activity makes urine! Activity makes urine! Repeat this 10 times, slowly. This is a very important lesson for new puppy owners. '

I can not over emphysize the importance of a schedule for both water and food intake which will but eliminations on a schedule and make prevention of accidents much easier.

Potty Training Tip

House Training: Ring My Bell!
how tho train a clear signal for the dog to let you know when he need to go out. IMHO a major cause of housetraining problems

biting and nipping
Insights Into Puppy Mouthing
"We can't ever just say if a dog is doing X behavior that a handler should always do Y handling technique. It just never is that black and white.

Its all about probabilities. If a dog does X behavior and the response is Y technique than we can often say there is a high probability of a particular response happening with most dogs. There are some fundamental things that are very high probability that apply to many dogs that do nothing or get a completely opposite response from other dogs.

...90% of the time if I clearly define something for owners and ask what their dog will likely do, they have a wonderfully detailed knowledge of what their dog will probably do. But most people don't look at the perimeters objectively or with clarity and worse they fall into a pattern of waiting until the dog has done the thing they don't want that they knew was probably going to happen. They then respond to what the dog did even though they could have predicted the Undesired response a week ahead of time. "

Bite Inhibition - How to Teach It
"Rather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.

So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog *will* bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite."

Crate Training
"http://clickersolutions.com/articles/spt/SPT_Crate_Training_Info.htm]Crate Training [/url]

Creating a Nighttime Ritual

Crate Training

But much more important than any of these are the follow articles on Socialization

Countdown to a Crackerjack Canine Companion
"The day you get your puppy, the clock is running. And time flies. Your puppy's critical period of socialization will begin to wane by three months and its most impressionable learning period starts to close by five months. Not surprisingly, most behavior and temperament problems are created during this time. There is so much to teach and nearly everything needs to be taught within just 12 weeks, when you puppy is between two and five months of age. It is vital that you know WHAT to teach and HOW to teach it. Going to puppy classes, reading behavior and training books and watching puppy videos is the quickest way to find out"

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1)
Why is it Necessary?




[url=http://www.flyingdogpress.com/puppack.html]IT TAKES A PACK TO RAISE A PUPPY

[ January 07, 2006, 09:57 PM: Message edited by: Toughynutter ]
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Originally posted by Lucy & Ethel's Dad:
Welcome Michael....We have something in common, My name is Grant.... and I have never heard of a dog named Grant.....Good taste in names LOL
Yeah, I named him Grant because the kennel I got him from was just down the street from where President Grant was born. We passed the house/museum on the way to the kennel.
 

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Hi and Welcome!

When my Scully was a pupster she made a habit of trying to nip and eat me and her daddy's fingers. What worked for us was making a sort of high-pitched squeal sound (much like what their littermates would do) saying a firm "NO", and giving her an appropriate item to bite on. I'm not a fountain of knowledge at all, but this is what worked for Scully. ;) Good luck!!
 

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Welcome Michael&Grant,He sounds like a little devil :) Never had a pup but,I think the best advice I was ever given was....In as far as possible, ignore bad behaviour and praise the good, and never, at any time, use physical punishment as a way of training him or correcting him. BTW welcome to the board :)
 
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Welcome, you will get great advice here. One other house training tip is to teather him to you with a lead when you can't pay close attention to him and frequent potty breaks. We look forward to pictures. yvonne
 
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Welcome. You are doing the right thing by crate training from the start. The crate was the single most important thing in housetraining Molly. Our Lab needed no work with housetraining but Bassets, well, they are a different story.
I look forward to seeing pictures of the pup!
 

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I'm a big believer in puppy school as soon as your vet says it's ok to be around other dogs. Most dogs probably think their name is "NO" so why should they respond. Puppy school will give you the tools to prevent bad behavior. People make the mistake of not going to dog school until they already have problems. It is normal for a puppy to bite, bark, chew on the furniture, and pee on the rug-you have to teach him what you want him to do. Dogs aren't mind readers. Well sometimes I think they are. ;)

Welcome to Cyberhound!
 

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Hi and welcome! Grant seems like a name for a dog up north here and not one from the volunteer state...lol...kidding aside...I believe crate training is the best option for most dogs. They HATE to soil their bedding area.Our dog Bessie had some "accidents" but for the most part she has done well.recently we hung a bell on the door knob and she will nudge the bell to ring it occasionally when she wants to go out so she is still learning. Some of the already posted links could be helpful. As for nipping ...Bessie does a lil bit of that and we say no and push her away or walk away. I hope you are able to resolve the issues you have. Jeff&Sandy
 

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welcome...from one new member to another! Puppies, though cute, sure can be a pain huh? We're in the nipping phase right now too and it does get old saying the same thing over and over. It looks to me like you've already gotten a lot of excellent advice from previous posts so I don't have much to add.

One thing I would say though is to remember patience is key. Puppies aren't that different from human babies in that they need consistency, lots of love/understanding/praise, and time and patience from their owners as they learn the ways of their new world. The best thing to do is pick one method and then diligently stick to it until puppy understands completely, which he will in time. :) Also...understanding why your puppy does the things he does can alse go a long way towards boosting your patience. For instance, very young puppies nip and bite in order to figure out the ranking order amongst their litter mates, it's also how they make friends. Just knowing that information can add a lot to your bag of tricks for dealing with your adorably annoying new friend. Good luck!

Melanie
 
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