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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

I'm Steven, who's living in Beijing, China. Since it's insanely difficult to find any Chinese forum about Basset Hound or anyone who has a hound among my friends, I found this website and registered my account.

Last Saturday my girlfriend and I brought 2-month old Tom home (an apartment with a big roof top area) from a vendor's house far from downtown Beijing. He's really cute. A Flickr album here: Tom Hound ??????? - a set on Flickr .

Tom is my first pet... But at the first night, it was definitely a nightmare for me. Tom kept howling in the kitchen (I closed the door to keep him from pooping everywhere at home) and I couldn't sleep at all. I went into the kitchen once a while to calm him down.

And the next day, my friends told me that was wrong. I should just leave him there howling and he will get familiar with the area eventually. So till now, he's improving well (still howling but not that horrible) and I can sleep for several hours every night.

Both of my girlfriend and I will work for 9 hours a day (from 11am to 8pm), so we have to leave Tom home for long. (Yah I know it might not be good for a Basset.) And come home late at night, clean the poops everywhere, and play for hours with him.

The pooping issue is really haunting me. He doesn't know how to pee and poop in a certain place. I tried to use newspaper with his pee to lead him but failed. Every night I need to spend half an hour to clean the mess in my kitchen and I bet Tom has ate some shit of his own.

What can I do? Can I buy a cage to solve the problem? Can anyone please help me to pass the first stage?

Thanks, my new friends (and maybe for the next 10-12 years...)

- Steven
 

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Hi Steven,

Welcome! wow, those are really nice pics of Tom, must be from very high quality camera!!

Do you have a backyard? or do you live more like in an apartment/condo?
Dunno what resources you have in Beijing, but here in the U.S., the common thing is to get a crate for Tom to be in during the day, unless you have a yard for your dog. And esp when he is puppy.

Well, 9 hours is really too long to leave Tom, esp as a puppy. Is there any way you or your gf can come home during lunch time and spend an hour or two with him? Or hire a dogwalker who can play with him? Or take him to a doggie daycare (that's what we have here, esp for people who are gone 8-10 hours/day).

he's going to need to pee/poop many times in 9 hours at his age. and the best way to show him where is to be there with him when he goes. you can use the crate because puppies/dogs don't tend to go pee/poo in their crate. But at your puppy's age, you cannot leave him in a crate for 9 hrs. He will definitely soil it and it will mess up his potty training. He really needs to pee/poop every 2-4 hours...

those are my initial thoughts. First, rethinking a better schedule for Tom. Second, you can buy a crate online if you have a schedule where someone takes him out every couple hours for bathroom.
--Welcome! Worm
 

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Yes you are going to have a real problem here .Way too long for a puppy to be by himself.Socialization is out the window.You cannot raise a temperamentally good pet in this way.A crate won't be much help because he will not be able to hold it that long and so besides cleaning up you will be having to bath the puppy too.Something has to give as far as how long he is going to be alone.Is there anyone who can babysit him during the day for 5 or 6 hours,which could work better.You have your hands full good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Dear Wworm,

Thanks for your reply! It must be really late now in the US.

Yah the pictures were taken by a 5D Mark II, which is pretty good. But I never took pictures of pets...

My home is more like an apartment. In Beijing we don't have backyards, most people live in apartments. It's such a crowded city, like NYC maybe? And here's the roof top area I was talking about: ???? | Flickr - Photo Sharing! .

Yah I can find some dog daycare places for Tom in the community. But I have a question: would putting Tom in daycare make him not familiar with and scared of my kitchen and me? Is it bad for him? (Sorry our day time jobs are too busy and the offices are really far from home, can't get home over lunch. //sigh)

I bought a crate the day I brought Tom home. It looks like this one: http://www.thenayshun.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/dog-crate.jpg . But I don't think it's the right place to put Tom in. He will get totally messed up in it for 10 hours right?

I've read some articles about crate training online, like this one: Dog Crate Training | DogTime.com - Find your wag. . Can I understand the basic idea for crate training is that the dog can see the crate as home and other places as where to pee and poo? And can I ask the daycare to do the crate training? (Sorry I don't think we have the crate training ideas in China...)

The dog stores in my community also recommended me to buy crates like this: http://www.extralargedogcrateshop.com/images/designer-color-wire-dog-homes.jpg . But, in Beijing (or maybe in the whole China), above the plate in the bottom, there's also wires for dogs to stand on. So the pee and poos will pass the wire and stay on the plate, and the wires will be clean enough.

People who work for long time a day will buy this kind of crates here. But I think with this idea, the crate training will make no sense right? Compare to this kind of crates, is daycare still better? (And another question: even with daycare, he can't learn about where to pee and poo at home right? How can I handle him at nights?)

And... about the roof top area... Can I leave Tom there when I'm working? Will he eat some dirty stuff on the floor??

Thanks again, Wworm.

- Steven
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes you are going to have a real problem here .Way too long for a puppy to be by himself.Socialization is out the window.You cannot raise a temperamentally good pet in this way.A crate won't be much help because he will not be able to hold it that long and so besides cleaning up you will be having to bath the puppy too.Something has to give as far as how long he is going to be alone.Is there anyone who can babysit him during the day for 5 or 6 hours,which could work better.You have your hands full good luck.
Thanks a lot bubbad. Now I think it's a big problem. But would daycare make him not familiar with the environment at home?
 

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oh yeah, ha ha, it is late here ~1am. but we like to stay up :)

it's good you're asking questions. you live and learn. with my first dog, we kept him in the kitchen w/newspaper too, but he would still pee in the house from time to time & go on carpet and furniture :(

this time I was wiser with Worm. we are in apartment too. well, one ?? for you is, is it ok for you to walk him outside on the street to pee and poo? dunno if you have the same laws here. here it is ok. we are not in the city, so there is lots of grass he can go in. here if Worm poos, i have to carry around poo bags & pick up his poo right away and throw it away. so if your situation is the same, i would highly suggest teaching him not to go in your apartment at all. that is because it is hard for them to understand that it is ok to go in part of the apartment (ie. kitchen), but not the whole apartment. much simpler to teach him that he canNOT go ANYWHERE inside the apartment, and will be easier for him to understand. it will be just a little trickier, because it sounds like he already has gone pee inside and will have the smell there.

Worm, but i did get him when he was older ~4 months, which means he is definitely able to hold it longer than your dog right now-- Worm had a total of ~6-12 pee accidents and 1 poo accident, and was really reliable after 1 1/2 months of training, when i could trust him not to go indoors at all.

the trick is: you have to take Tom out all the time. At 4 months, I took Worm out 6x/day. Take him out to the same potty spots as soon as he wakes up. After he eats. After a lot of activity. Before bedtime.

and the rest of the time, you have to watch Tom like a hawk, when he is at home. as soon as he starts to pee, you have to stop him, carry him outside, and have him go in the pee/poo spot. I was very, very tired the first 1 1/2 months, but it really paid off. When you cannot watch him that closely (ie. his every move), you must put him in the crate, where he will not go bathroom if you don't leave him there too long.

other people will be able to tell you better what a 2 month old pup needs at night, but yes, i think you can put him in the crate at night when you sleep. At 4 months, I was pleasantly surprised to find that Worm can hold it all night and never soiled his crate. maybe at 2 months, you have to set an alarm for middle of night and take him out for potty? or at least take him out when he whines for potty? i don't know if they can hold it all night at that age. you must take him out for potty first thing in the morning.

you are right, he may not learn potty training skills at daycare. because they will clean wherever he goes. so you must teach him how to be potty trained at home, as described above.

probably for your situation, daycare is a good solution. he will benefit from socializing with lots of dogs (Worm loves it). i work half time, so I am able to be with him a half day most days. my one long day 8-10 hours, he goes to daycare once/week. but other dogs there go 5x/week for people who work full time. he will not forget you or forget home. it is great exercise for them. they come home very, very tired. and will be easier for you to crate train and house train this way.

those are my thoughts-- please keep us posted!
you CAN have a dog that learns to never pee/poo indoors. just takes lots of planning and lots of attention at first. but once it's done, it's really great.
 

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Yah the pictures were taken by a 5D Mark II, which is pretty good. But I never took pictures of pets...

**great camera!!**

I bought a crate the day I brought Tom home. It looks like this one: http://www.thenayshun.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/dog-crate.jpg . But I don't think it's the right place to put Tom in. He will get totally messed up in it for 10 hours right?

**yes, will be messed up in there that long. people here will tell you better what a 2 month old needs. i'm going to guess something like you have to take him out ever 1-3 hours if he is awake in the crate (playing, crying/whining), and every 4-6 hours at night when he is sleeping...??**

**this is plastic crate-- it has some advantages. like doggie can't see out as well. sometimes this is calming**

I've read some articles about crate training online, like this one: Dog Crate Training | DogTime.com - Find your wag. . Can I understand the basic idea for crate training is that the dog can see the crate as home and other places as where to pee and poo? And can I ask the daycare to do the crate training? (Sorry I don't think we have the crate training ideas in China...)

**yes, that's right, you have the idea. do more reading on crate training too. the more you know about it, the better. daycare would not do crate training. you must do the housetraining for your home**

The dog stores in my community also recommended me to buy crates like this: http://www.extralargedogcrateshop.com/images/designer-color-wire-dog-homes.jpg . But, in Beijing (or maybe in the whole China), above the plate in the bottom, there's also wires for dogs to stand on. So the pee and poos will pass the wire and stay on the plate, and the wires will be clean enough.

**this is the crate Worm has. we like it because he can see out. and is portable and flat when it collapses. i don't like the caret you are describing in Beijing because it can be uncomfy for dog to stand/sit on wires for such a long time.**


People who work for long time a day will buy this kind of crates here. But I think with this idea, the crate training will make no sense right? Compare to this kind of crates, is daycare still better? (And another question: even with daycare, he can't learn about where to pee and poo at home right? How can I handle him at nights?)

**yeah, i agree with you. yes, i would say daycare is better option than having him go in a wire-bottom crate and have to be with his pee/poo all day.**

And... about the roof top area... Can I leave Tom there when I'm working? Will he eat some dirty stuff on the floor??

**Tom might bark up there if left alone so long. Bassets are very social creatures and like to be with other dogs/people. daycare probably better solution. he needs things to do during the day, stimulation, other creatures to play with!**

also, i might suggest that you put Tom in a crate in your room at night. he is less likely to whine or be upset, if he can be near you. plus you can hear him when he whines and tells you he needs to pee/poo in middle of the night.**

Thanks again, Wworm.

- Steven
**anytime, man!**
--Worm
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Worm,

What can I say? I'm soooooooo moved by your answers. It's from a stranger from the other side of the earth!!! Thanks. Thanks. Thanks.

Here we don't have any law about walking pets outdoor. We don't have to clean up the poos on the roads (but lots of people still do that and I think I will.) Actually in China we don't have the culture of raising pets, and some parents (like mine) don't like their children to have pets at home (because they think they're dirty and dangerous.)

But since I live some far away from them who are in southern China, it's not a big problem, for now.

The question is, I've been told by the vendor that I can't take puppies outdoor esp to the grass yards, or he will get infected by the virus or something bad. We can only take them out and walk them after 6 months... Is this true? I really want to walk him outdoor...

I think I need to go ask the daycare tonight for prices. (I think it's about 5 USD a day.) And I will try set alarms in mid night and take him out of the crate for poo and pee. I bet in the first nights I put him in the crate, he will be insane all night!!!! T_T

The "apartment and part of the apartment" is great to know for me. Thanks!!!

- Steven
 

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Of course, you are welcome! it's fun to have people all over the world on this forum.

I don't know about that 6 month rule. I was definitely able to take Worm out anywhere at 4 months. Other people here will know better, like Bubbad and Mikey T.

I am no expert on this at all-- but should mention that when I looked at Tom's pics, they look interesting to me. Does Day 64 mean 2 months & 4 days, etc? If so, Tom almost looks more like a beagle puppy to me than a basset puppy. Basset puppies look more like that when they are first born. But if i recall correctly, by 2 months, ears are already long, body is long, and legs are short... thought I should mention that to you. of course, you are welcome on this forum no matter what!! and again, i am DEFINITELY not an expert here so i could be totally wrong. you can ask the others here what they think...

Here are some youtube videos to compare~
Beagle puppy at 2 months:

Basset hound puppy at 2 months:
(these are 7 1/2 wks old, even younger than Tom...)

 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Dear Worm,

Thanks for your suggestion. Now I'm also confused... To be honest, the dog business in China is not so serious and we don't have certifications from the government or something. So... there are two things I'm not sure about: 1) the birthdate of Tom, 2) his breed.

If he's not 2-month old but 1-month old instead, will he look more like a basset hound?

If he's not basset, but a beagle, or a baby of a basset and a beagle, what kind of problems will I meet?

Thanks. (tears)

** follow-up **

Worm,

I just called the vendor. And she called the "dog factory". Here's what I got from her after several rounds of phone calls:

"His parents are both basset hounds. There's not mistake. But his birth date should be July 10th, which was mistaken."

So I guess it would be fine...?

- Steven
 

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I will say that my pup (he is about 4 1/2 months old now) is just finally REALLY getting the basset look. Before he looked like a mutated dachshund!

Here are some pics of flash for you to compare your pup to. The one with the top of his head cut off is Flash at 7 weeks old. The other pic was taken when he was about 3/4 weeks old.
 

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I will say that my pup (he is about 4 1/2 months old now) is just finally REALLY getting the basset look. Before he looked like a mutated dachshund!

Here are some pics of flash for you to compare your pup to. The one with the top of his head cut off is Flash at 7 weeks old. The other pic was taken when he was about 3/4 weeks old.
Thanks a lot charady2! It really comforted me...
 

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Try this for nighttime:
Put his crate with a nice soft blanket in it at the side of your bed. When he has to pee (a couple of times per night for a young pup) he will fuss and you should get up, carry him to his potty place in your yard, stand there until hee does his business, then praise him and bring him back to his bed. This method teaches him that if he lets you know he has to pee, you will take him outside.

I slept with my arm over the side of the bed and my hand near the puppy. This is a comfort to a baby animal who doesn't know why he's suddenly away from his litter in a strange situation. Bassets are pack animals and hate to be isolated. This method of putting his crate near your bed also gives him more time with you.

For daytime, I always blocked off a small puppyproof area with a gate. The crate, with the door open and a soft blanket inside, became his haven. I spread newspaper over the rest of the floor for accidents, and gave him a stuffed kong when I wasn't there- this will keep the puppy occupied with getting the food out of the kong and give him something to do if you have to leave him for a few hours. Here is a link to the kong: http://www.healthypets.com/kinkonuldogt.html

Daycare or a dog walker are needed in this situation, a young pup will be miserable if you leave him for many hours while you work.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Try this for nighttime:
Put his crate with a nice soft blanket in it at the side of your bed. When he has to pee (a couple of times per night for a young pup) he will fuss and you should get up, carry him to his potty place in your yard, stand there until hee does his business, then praise him and bring him back to his bed. This method teaches him that if he lets you know he has to pee, you will take him outside.

I slept with my arm over the side of the bed and my hand near the puppy. This is a comfort to a baby animal who doesn't know why he's suddenly away from his litter in a strange situation. Bassets are pack animals and hate to be isolated. This method of putting his crate near your bed also gives him more time with you.

For daytime, I always blocked off a small puppyproof area with a gate. The crate, with the door open and a soft blanket inside, became his haven. I spread newspaper over the rest of the floor for accidents, and gave him a stuffed kong when I wasn't there- this will keep the puppy occupied with getting the food out of the kong and give him something to do if you have to leave him for a few hours. Here is a link to the kong: Xtreme KONGS- For extreme chewers - Xtreme KONG (Large)

Daycare or a dog walker are needed in this situation, a young pup will be miserable if you leave him for many hours while you work.
Thanks mate! Daycare tomorrow! :)
 

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I noticed they said his birthday was July 10. If that's the case, he really was too young when you brought him home, so you may have your work cut out for you. I hope you are willing to do so, as a dog is a lifetime commitment.

As always, there was a lot of good advice here, and you were very open to it. Hope you stick around and ask lots more questions and let us know how your little guy is doing! And pictures, of course. We love pictures here.

Tom is a very cute little guy, (great pictures of him!), and I wish you many happy years together.
 

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couple things 1. You need to have realistic expectation of house training. Bassets are natoriously hard to house train The earliest I have seen one housetrained, far different than simply not having accidents is six month with 1 year being more typical. Imho the reason for this is the breed is slow to mature in developing sphnicter control Simply they can not hold it as well or as long as other breed getting fustrated with the dog does not help see
Houset training your puppy


also when it comes to hbouse training thing what you want the end product to be. Do you want the dog to be able to hold it while your gone, do you want the dog to go in a particular spot in the house. Why this is important is using intermeadate steps like paper training a dog that you enventual want house trainine is only going to slow the process down chose the behavior you want then stick with it. If paper training is the way to go in your situation I think The follow or similar productw have a big advantage of traditional paper training.
Puppy Potty Tray

they are fairly large but provide a larger substrate differential that is critical to house training than newspaper or potty pads




Even using a crate at night I would plan in using an alarm clock to wake your self up to take the dog out to potty then back to bed.

creating a night time ritual

And the next day, my friends told me that was wrong. I should just leave him there howling and he will get familiar with the area eventually. So till now, he's improving well (still howling but not that horrible) and I can sleep for several hours every night.
This is the most idiotic advice ever. It is akin to say when you bring a baby home you should but it in a crib and not go to it when it cries etc. When a dog or by cryies whines it does so because a basic need is not beeing met. For basset that are social creature issolation is general bad You need to find a way with a crate or some other method the dog does not need to be issolated doing so is going to have prolong negative effects on the dog

see Harmonney Programme

Of Hostages & Relationships
Do you need to isolate a dog or limit playtime with other dogs or people?



Your concerns on daycare are completely backward. You need to be concerned with the harm cause by issolation by confine the puppy in a single room with no contact of the outside world is a very short period of time you will have a dog terrified of everything new the period of time to socialize a dog to people dogs and the evironment is exceedingly short failure to do so is the leading cause of behavior problems in dogs,

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 1) Why is it Necessary?

Puppy Socialisation and Habituation (Part 2) How to go about it

Position Statement - Puppy Socialization
American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior
Because the first three months are the period when sociability outweighs fear, this is the primary window of opportunity for puppies to adapt to new people, animals, and experiences. Incomplete or improper socialization during this important time can increase the risk of behavioral problems later in life including fear, avoidance, and/or aggression. Behavioral problems are the greatest threat to the owner-dog bond. In fact, behavioral problems are the number one cause of relinquishment to shelters.3 Behavioral issues, not infectious diseases, are the number one cause of death for dogs under three years of age.
 

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Dear Worm,

Thanks for your suggestion. Now I'm also confused... To be honest, the dog business in China is not so serious and we don't have certifications from the government or something. So... there are two things I'm not sure about: 1) the birthdate of Tom, 2) his breed.

If he's not 2-month old but 1-month old instead, will he look more like a basset hound?

If he's not basset, but a beagle, or a baby of a basset and a beagle, what kind of problems will I meet?

Thanks. (tears)

** follow-up **

Worm,

I just called the vendor. And she called the "dog factory". Here's what I got from her after several rounds of phone calls:

"His parents are both basset hounds. There's not mistake. But his birth date should be July 10th, which was mistaken."

So I guess it would be fine...?

- Steven
Oh, sorry Steven, didn't mean to upset you about this...! but yeah, that makes more sense to me, that he is younger. I think bassets look like that more when they are young. at 2 months, i would think they look more bassety as in the videos. but i'm sure there are variations.

to answer your ??s-- actually w/basset hounds, you probably know they have more problems w/their long backs? ok for them to jump up, but not really to jump down. later, it would be good to have dog stairs and ramps, so that he does not jump down off the bed or sofa. and sometimes i've read here that people don't like them to use stairs in the first year of life.

beagles can also have back problems (have somewhat longer backs too), i don't believe as much as bassets tho. bassets can grow to 40-60 pounds on average, pretty big. beagles are much smaller, tho they tend to be more energetic and yippier. beagle/basset combos would just be a combo of both, and there are several dogs on this forum that are beagle/bassets... it's all good :)

and yes, please keeps posting more fun pictures of Tom here, we love to see them!
--Worm
 

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Wow $5/day? PB & I are moving to China! We pay a discounted $14/half day!! Hmm... but were going to have to bring lots of peanut butter. Chinese food isn't my favorite!! Welcome & good luck with the pup!! He will looove doggie daycare.
 

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beagles can also have back problems (have somewhat longer backs too),
Just to clear up any posible confusion back length does not correspond to back problems there are many dog breeds with much longer backs than a basset and dachshund that hardly ever have problems with the back. Bassets are a dwarf. ie shortened limbs. What cause the shortened limbs changes the composition of the disk in the back so they are more brittle and eaiser to rupture. A disk of a 1 year basset is akin to the disk of a 8-9 year non-dwarf breed. there are a number of other dwarf breed that do not have the same characteristic limb shortening but with the same sort of Disk These breeds include beagles and mini and toy poodles. It is likely that dwarfism was a part of getting the smaller size but later bred away from that look. So it is simply the composition of the intervertibrate disk not the length of the back. Just for the record conformational a beagle should be square ie the height equal to the length a long back is a conformational fault.


see Canine Intervertebral Disk Disease
Disks can be divided into two histochemical types: 1) chondrodystrophoid and 2) nonchondrodystrophoid or fibroid. The word "chondrodystrophoid" literally means faulty development or nutrition of cartilage. In humans, chondrodystrophoism is recognized physically (phenotypically) as dwarfism, where individuals are smaller than normal and whose parts (especially limbs) are disproportionate. Certain breeds of dogs, such as dachshunds, show their chondrodystrophism by having disproportionately short and angulated limbs. However, phenotypic characteristics alone can not be used to identify chondrodystrophoid dogs. Other breeds, such as miniature poodles and beagles, have been histochemically identified to have chondrodystrophoid disks and yet do not appear outwardly to be chondrodystrophoid.
bassets can grow to 40-60 pounds on average,
that estimate is on the small side keeping in mind femalea tend to be `10lb smaller than males of the same liter a 45 LB male is small 65-and above large


ok for them to jump up, but not really to jump down.
Nothing generates more opinion the the matter of jump on this forum. I state opinion for a very good reason there are few if any fact on this issue so I will give you what fact there are mix with my opinion an try to clearly distinguish between the two

fact Jumping down places more force on the dog than jumping up. whether and how this force impacts the back is a matter of conjecture/. It is believed by many fumping in a straignt line puts little force on the back. Twisting and rotational forces put much more load on the back. This is more fully explained in the link above.

2. Back injuries ar very common in dachsund if you look at the thread on cancer in dogs you will see a posted the results of recent study on dog deaths it is said 40% of dachshunds death are due to nuerolocial problems the bulk of these are likely back issue/ Basset on the other hand while higher than all breed in general are on a par with beagle, mini poodles etc which are not storgly linked to having back problem even though they are dwarfs as well.

3. most vets and nuerologist state the number one contributing emnvironmental factor of back injury is being overweight, not jumping or trauma from jumping a problem many basset suffer from,

4. Limiting jumping/stair etc in puppies is not about the back and all about the front assembly. That is the front legs are what that and asborbs the trauma from jumping. In puppies and all animals that have bones in the growth stage at the end of the bones is a softer cratilage like area refered to as a growth plate. It is from this area that produced the cells for legthening and thicking a particular bone. This are is moch sofeter than bone and can be injurgerd by trauma. In dasset and other dwarf appearing breed the growth plates are much different than typical dog breeds. There are some that believe this makes them more easily damaged by trauma but there is no proof. Damage to a growth plate can cause the bone to stop growing altogether or slow dramatically. There are a number of paired bones ie ulnar and raddus in the form arms that will cause angular limb deformity, thet twisting of the leg if the bones are of unequal lengtb. Proper basset conformation requires a small amount of this crookedness of the leg to bend the leg under the chest. Dogs growth is faster earlier and life and slow downs gradually. until the growth plates close. The growth plates close at different times for different bones and even different times depending on the which end on the same bone on average beginning a 6 month and ending 12-14 month with larger dog taking up to 18-24 months and smaller dog close even sooner 6-8 months. So any damagage to a growth plate is going to cause more problems for a dog if it occurs early in life rather than latter. hence the varrious recommendation of know jumping for six mnth 1 year or it does not matter if the dog jumps or not. It is very difficult becasue of the abnormal growth plates of a basset if any damage is genetic in nature or caused by trauma and basset are supose to have some angular limb deformity to begin with. So you will see vet not familliar with the breed recommend surgery for a dog that is normal. Breeder say that a problem is the result of trauma not genetic, etc IMHO alot of so called problems on the from=nt assembly are not problem in the first place. I also thing that there is a tendency to blame trauma more that it should be but like I said it is realy hard to prove one way or another. IMHO a reasonal approach is six month to a year of not jumping stairs not just because the risk of this activity but because basset of this age tend to be claumsier as well and that can exacerbate an injury Ie the trauma from falling down a set of stair vs simply climbing them., When the dog becomes so larger that it is diffcult to accomidate/pickup the risk of traumic injury to the growth plates is much reduced and even if it does occur it is not going to have a profound adverse effect that the same injur would have if the dog was 3-4 months old.

5. the risk of back injury from jumping in an adult dog I think is fairly low provided the dog is of proper weight. A conditioned athealetic dog is less like to suffer from an orthopeadic injury than an out of shape couch potato especial th weekend warrior type. So provide stair and other amenities for the less atheletic dog can be prudent wheras provide opurtunites to further condition the atheletic dog makes sense as well. So wether to keep the dog atheletic fit and trim or to make accomedation like stair and ramp is an individual choice, with out a lot evidence that one is better than the other.

EPIPHYSEAL PLATE CLOSURE IN DOGS


Histopathologic study of long-bone growth plates confirms the basset hound as an osteochondrodysplastic breed


Researchers discover origin of short-leg dog breeds

Dwarfed dogs: What exactly is going on in there?

Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules?
As is all too often the case, however, these opinions generally lack solid scientific evidence to support them. Very little is known about the precise risks and benefits of different types and intensities of exercise in growing animals.

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The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available.
Nutrition in Large breed Puppies
The best way to meet the optimal dietary requirements for large breed puppies is with a commercial diet specifically designed for this purpose. Though many people recommend feeding an adult food, with the idea that it is lower in calories than regular puppy food, adult diets vary widely in calorie content, so this is not automatically true. Additionally, adult diets are not usually appropriately restricted in calcium content. It is also important not to add vitamin and mineral supplements containing calcium to properly balanced puppy diets as this is very likely to increase calcium intake beyond safe levels.
 
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