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I've had a life long affection for Bassets and in the last few months have started to research the breed. I was a little surprised to read how important it is to find out if a Basset is right for you. I was floored after reading Diane Morgan's "The Basset Hound Owner's Survival Guide." After reading this book I was sad to realize I do not want to deal with this dog. Now a few weeks have gone by and I still feel that desire to get one or two.

I've got so many questions I'm not sure how to ask besides numbering them. I feel awkward about asking some of these, but I don't want a couple of bassets needing rescue which would in turn depress me and I'm only responding to the book.


1. Are they hard to train? Are they stubborn or aggressive? Are they aggressive? I keep reading about how sweet natured they are.

2. How bad do these things smell? What can you do about it? Will the whole house smell like dog?

3. How bad is the shedding? Do all Bassets shed differently? Is it seasonal? Is there anyway to
deal with it?

4. Aggressive behavior- Growling at you. I don't like that in a dog. Growling at you when you try
to move it...like when you're sleeping or around food or bones. The book mentions a dog that will bite you in the face if you try to move it in the middle of the night.

5. Eating everything, especially rocks. I've seen quite a few posts of this. I find this
unbelievable. They eat rocks and then require surgery or die?

6. Lazy during walks? You actually have to pick them up or drag them home?

7. "Butt Bonding"- The basset likes to sleep with his butt in your face, while passing gas.

8. Eating poop?- Jesus, make it stop. Peeing in your bed, nice.

9. Bed time- they actually need a ritual to go to bed. And will wake up early and bark/howl. This
can't be trained out of them.

10. Drool? Some dogs drool more than others, but you'll find puddles on the floors and stains on
the walls?

11. If the above is somewhat accurate, why on earth would anyone get a basset?



I'm not sure why the post has formatted the way it has. It's not like that on the edit screen.
 

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There are many on this site that can answer your questions better than I. I laughed out loud by the time I got to number 7. I can only respond to question number 11. It is true that bassets are a unique breed and it takes a special family to be enslaved to the "four legged beasts". But I love them and have never been loved back by a dog like I have my hounds!
 

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Well yeah they stink, drool, and shed. They can be stubborn or slow learners, but they are smart.
My dog sleeps in his crate, not my face. All dogs have the ability to growl, and or bite. But this is were socialization really counts, and training. My dog never ate a rock, but he can smell a treat from miles away. He is really good at walking, but will go "flat" in the heat. I don't think there is a breed of dog that won't eat poo, but not all dogs do it. I need a bedtime ritual, not the dog. Yes, my house really stinks and that is drool on the ceiling!

I think it would be really good for you to find a basset club in your area, or just one or two to play with. After you spend time with some you'll have a better idea if one is right for you.
Joan
 

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Answers 1-10: Yes
11: Because they're cute and sweet enough to negate 1-10.
I don't think a basset is for you. A fish might better meet your criteria.
 

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1. Are they hard to train? Yes, if you want a dog to train, buy a Doberman, Rotweiler, Riesenschnauzer or a German Shepherd.

Are they stubborn or aggressive? They could be stubborn, I've one of each kind. But I've never come across an aggressive basset, that's not their nature!

2. How bad do these things smell? What can you do about it? Will the whole house smell like dog? If the dog is healthy and they get the propriate food, they don't smell.

3. How bad is the shedding? Do all Bassets shed differently? Is it seasonal? Is there anyway to
deal with it? They shed - almost all the time. Vacuum every day

4. Aggressive behavior- Growling at you. I don't like that in a dog. Growling at you when you try
to move it...like when you're sleeping or around food or bones. The book mentions a dog that will bite you in the face if you try to move it in the middle of the night. This is not basset like at all!

5. Eating everything, especially rocks. I've seen quite a few posts of this. I find this
unbelievable. They eat rocks and then require surgery or die? This is not common, I've heard about some few occations. It's probably something a dog of any breed could do.

6. Lazy during walks? You actually have to pick them up or drag them home? Mine could walk in the forest all day, we've been to 10-12 hours walks in rough terrain. But they have problem understanding why they should walk around the block....

7. "Butt Bonding"- The basset likes to sleep with his butt in your face, while passing gas.Mine rarely pass gas, it's a food problem if they do.

8. Eating poop?- Jesus, make it stop. Peeing in your bed, nice. Poop eating is normally a puppy behavior, I also had a rotweiler who did that.

9. Bed time- they actually need a ritual to go to bed. And will wake up early and bark/howl. This
can't be trained out of them. Mine will sleep until dragged out of bed like lazy teenagers.

10. Drool? Some dogs drool more than others, but you'll find puddles on the floors and stains on
the walls? Mine don't drool, but they need to be dried after drinking water and eating, like you and me.

11. If the above is somewhat accurate, why on earth would anyone get a basset? Having a dog can't normally be justified logically - but you'll love them, I'm positive!



--------------------
<span style="color:#009900">The one that drools rules, :p
Steinar - daddy and foodslave to Emma and Doris!

http://www.basset-hound.net.tf</span>
 

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Who doesn't like the smell of fritos?????? My husband thinks Shyla smells but I happen to like it so go figure!! :huh:
 

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If #'s 1-10 bother you then you do NOT need to get a hound (of any kind, basset or otherwise). I have seen almost all of the behaviors described above, but I have never seen a Basset growl at a human, unless it was playing. Bassets (along with beagles and Goldens) may be the most gentle and forgiving of all dogs and are not going to bite their owners.

They stink, shed, drool, swallow any object that will fit in their mouths, bark, howl, turn in 100 circles before lying down, think they are lap dogs at 50+ pounds, will jump on furniture, jump on you & your guests and occasionally forget the bathroom is outside. Bassets require a lot of patience from their owners and a lot of unconditional love. They are uniquely suited to giving the unconditional love right back to the owner; however, they are not very patient with their owners.
 

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This is the way I look at it:

Getting any animal (dog, cat, parakeet, lizard - you name it) requires a commitment that involves good and bad. I commend you for doing your research and asking questions before forging ahead and perhaps making a mistake for you and the dogs.

My first Basset, Rosebud, shed constantly and more than any other dog I've ever had (and I've had many). But Huckleberry only sheds lightly. But with any dog, the more you groom them regularly, the less they shed.

Just about all dogs eat poo at one time or another. If it's a continuing problem, there are remedies that help but usually it is when they are puppies and can be fairly easily discouraged.

Rosebud was food aggressive and didn't like to be moved on the bed. But that was MY fault as I let her get away with it and so it was a problem of my own making.

They can be stubborn as all get out. But then so can I. Training should begin the day you bring your dog home and it should end the day they go to the bridge. Dogs are people pleasers, even Bassets, and a firm, gentle, consistent hand works wonders

My Lab is a rock hound but not my Basset. My kids ate dirt and I didn't like that either.

Wet dogs smell. Dogs not eating the right food smell. Dogs rolling in dead things and animal droppings smell. All are fixable.

There are many many types of dogs to choose from and that's a good thing (Thank you, Martha). If the things you've listed are very worrisome for you, then I'm sure that there's another breed out there that will minimize them. But all dogs have pros and cons. You'll never find a dog that doesn't have any drawbacks or attributes you would rather they didn't have. For me....Bassets are what makes me happy and I'll always have one.

Good Luck!
 

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I think Steiner summed it up quite well! They are usually what you make them ...it's how you raise them and how you care for them that determine the answers to these questions.

For the record ...had I read any of the Basset books prior to seeing Belvedere at the Humane Society, I probably would have been frightened away from the breed. But as I have learned through experirence with my friends and their dogs (of other breeds), they all have issues and it depends on the household and how willing you are to take on the issues of each particular breed. Some need more bathing ...some need more discipline and exercise, etc.

We in the Basset community deal with the shedding and a bit of drool and things such as this because we love the sweet nature of the Basset. There is an awful lot to be said for the non-aggressive hounds. And as someone on this forum once said ...it is like having cartoon characters running around our house all day! They are the entertainment. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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The simple fact is, dogs in general, of any breed, have to be housetrained and until they are, they make messes (we are going through that with our formerly stray Lab right now). They shed. Most drool at least sometimes (when the humans are eating something they really want!). Most get on furniture unless you teach them not to or they're too little (though my Yorkie got up anywhere he wanted to, he must've had pogo sticks for legs).

They stink sometimes. They bark sometimes when you don't want them to. They get into things and chew things and they don't always behave and they're messy and inconvenient and stubborn sometimes. If you want a quiet, orderly life and a pristine house you don't want a dog of any size or breed.

BUT ... ! Those of us who have had our hearts stolen by the four-legged, furry, drooling, stubborn, occasionally noisy, often messy critters wouldn't have it any other way. Dog hair on the floor and furniture and drool on the ceiling fan (my basset is particularly gifted in this area :lol: ) are part of the decor. And yup, the place smells like dogs sometimes. I suppose we do, too. It's worth it to us. You have to decide if it's worth it to you. Maybe it's not.
 

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Think Valerie said it all, but in their defence I will add that I have NEVER had a dog like Toby. He brings sooooo much pleasure and laughter into this house. They are real characters, and I think all different. He is more of a handful than my wee westie and certainly needs a lot attention in the grooming department i.e. brushed daily, nails clipped every 2 weeks or so, ears cleaned weekly or more and of course making sure that he doesn't injure his back jumping off furniture or using stairs etc, but I have to say, for me, it is well worth the effort because of the ammount of sheer pleasure he gives in return.
 

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I am still pretty new to the basset world myself.. Mine is still a pup so I don't have the drool problem, I got a hound mitt and rub both of my dogs down with it every day. I have found since doing this, my lab smells better too. My pup is still too young to smell I think.

I don't have the issues listed above yet, but I find it hard to believe that these animals could be agressive, I know many people with them, so I did have the opportunity to know what I was getting into ahead of time.

I also hung out here and read a lot of posts, I decided all the trouble was worth the return, so far I have not been disappointed. Watching my pup eat a banana is the funniest thing I have ever seen.. things like that make it all worthwhile.
 

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Meh :blink:

Why do some people have curly blonde hair, others straight brown and others --- none?

Why do some love oatmeal while others thinks it's the most vile stuff ever?

Why do some say "sneakers" and others, "tennis shoes"?

Why do some women marry men who smoke cigars and others, men who wear smelly sneakers and others, men who take three showers a day and would never dream of smoking cigars or wearing smelly sneakers?

Why concrete? Why not brick?

And what's the deal with plastic wood? I mean, really. :rolleyes:

You say tomato. I say tomahto.

Etc.

You don't like bassets. Oh well ... that means more for us!!! :D :D
 

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Tomato,
Tomahto,
Potato,
Potahto
Let's call the whole thing off.
These are not an "easy" dog in terms of care and maintenance and training.
In terms of love, though?
The EASIEST dog I've ever had.
 

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I have 2 dogs. I got Kit, a mutt when he was a pup. He was easy to train as he is very high strung and HATES to be scolded. Lea the basset I rescued when she was a year old. Yup she used to eat poop (my friend's Great Dane did too) and she will eat anything which causes tummy upsets. She isn't aggressive at all nor has she eaten any rocks and she doesn't stink or drool . She's not allowed on my bed so the butt thing isn't an issue. My biggest frustration with her is she barks like mad and chews EVERYTHING... my furniture, shoes, walls, futon, feather duvet cover just to name a few. Also if you like having a nice garden, forget it.

If you have never owned a dog OR you aren't a patient person I would NOT recommend you get a basset. Honestly I love my Lea to death but if someone were to offer me another basset I would not take it. The reason for this is that I'm just not laid back enough (although that might be changing :lol: ) In your case I think you would be better off with a different type of dog maybe an older dog who is already trained.

Basset people are very different people indeed, and I mean that in a good way!

Lou
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Watching my pup eat a banana is the funniest thing I have ever seen.. things like that make it all worthwhile.
[/b]
Funny


I appreciate all the info.
 

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My Moe used to bite me (professional help and lots of clever training tricks took care of that), he took MONTHS to housetrain (I literally cried in despair some days), he destroyed everything within reach (training and Moe-proofing helped), he stole food, stuffies, homework, mail, and shoes (more Moe-proofing), he smelled bad (expensive shampoo search), he was a very picky eater (expensive food search, stern advice from forum members, and eventual adoption of companion dog cured him), he refused to sleep in his dogbed and opted for furniture (infection requiring an e-collar at seven years old FINALLY got him to sleep in HIS bed), and he whines to get what he wants... still. I have NEVER loved a dog or any pet as much as I love him. Perhaps the emotional energy and work involved in raising a Basset (a rescue one with many issues) are what makes the bond stronger? He has made me laugh when I wanted to cry and he has comforted me when no one else would, or could. He has amused me with his antics and amazed me with his cunning. He has forced me to pay attention to him, thus taking my mind of whatever bothers me... he prevents me from being selfish.

Now and again I wonder... if I had known the work involved in taking him, would I have done it? I'm very glad that I'll never know! He is my Moe!!

Taky your time in making a decision. It's good advice to spend some time with Bassets so you can judge for yourself. They are not for everyone. Only YOU can say if they are for you.
 

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What Terry said about loving Moe more than any other dog -- my husband said something similar about George one night. I was telling George what a GOOD BOY he is and stuff like that (he eats that up, of course :lol: ) and Bill said, "He may not be the 'best' dog we've ever had, but he's certainly the most lovable." Ain't it the truth.
 

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Dudley has agression issues, but they have improved greatly. Not quickly, it's taken years.

Considering he was turned in to rescue by people who beat, kicked, and yelled at him for his first 20 months or so, he was made into an aggressive dog, I believe it's not his true nature. Those people caused all his aggro problems.
Love and patience worked wonders, but slowly for a year or so. Importantly, from day one Dudley was never aggressive torwards us. Then we got Minnie, a super-sweetheart basset, and he learned more about trusting people from her. She helped him a LOT.
However, there are still situations I don't trust him in. He has never bitten anyone, but if things went wrong in a certain situation, I think he still might.

Oh yeah, don't think I ever admitted this here before, but he's been on Prozac since a month or two after we got him, I expect he'll be on it forever. (Good thing the dog version is cheap, 30 cents a day, I think.)

Still, I can't help but wonder how good he could be if I'd gotten him as a puppy?

Vision, all I can really say is; you would fall in love with my Minnie in 2 seconds, but if you were around Dudley for 2 weeks, you'd probably not want a basset.

As for me, Dudley is my best friend.
 
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