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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rudolph is here and is very caring.

But there is a problem, I assume it's serious separation anxiety.

He follows me everywhere which is fine. But after a long walk he was laying down at my feet so I decided to try a short nap for myself. I closed the bedroom door(an off limits area) and tried to sleep. For the first 20 minutes he paced around the apartment; I figured he would settle down. Instead he began short huffing which turned into LOUD yelping.

I went out and gave him a cookie and tried to relax him, then reattempted the nap. Same thing. So I let him in the bedroom figuring he would lie down. As soon as I layed down he tried to get in the bed. And this will not stop. It's either he's getting in my bed or he's yelping.

If anyone has a solution to this let me know as my bed linens will not take drool and I will bring him back to the HOP today if it looks like a sleepless night ahead for me.

It feels like I'm letting everyone down, but I don't know what to do.

Maybe he's been through so many changes he must be around someone all the time.
 

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Do you have a crate that you can use for Rudolph? If you are trying to take a nap or sleep, I would put him in the crate with a really "special" toy like a Kong stuffed with peanut butter and dog cookies, something that would keep him occupied. I would put the crate beside your bed so that he can see you as well. If he is crying, don't try (I know, it's hard) to comfort him, that just reinforces his anxiety. If you don't have a crate, maybe you could use a gate so that he would still be able to see you in your room. He is probably very scared and nervous, being in a new place with a stranger and is bound to have some issues from what I was reading. I hope that this helps....
 

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Do you have a baby gate you could put in your door way so he can see you but not get to your bed.

Stephanie
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No crate.

I went to my car to get my cell phone to call some friends for advice and I could hear his yelping as I was walking back to the building.
 

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Most bassets, dogs and puppies, when introduced to new situations, need reassurance. This isn't unique to this particular dog; it would be necessary with almost any basset. You might need to modify your expectations a bit during this adjustment period. Some of our rescues have slept beside us, either on the bed or floor, with a hand on them, the first few nights they've been in our home. It doesn't go on forever, though. If you can get through the adjustment phase, he should get a bit less needy. Good luck--you're doing a really generous thing by accommodating this poor fella. :)
 

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When I brought Lea home the first few days were hard. She would stand by the front door and howl and I was miserable knowing she couldn't go back and that she didn't understand this was now her forever home.

Don't give up so easily! Give this poor boy a chance he's just met you and everything is new for him. He just lost a whole bunch of buddies and must be feeling very insecure. What's a couple of sleepless nights? Lea used to jump on my bed and flat basset on me. At the time I thought she was pretending to be asleep hehehe it was hilarious but I did NOT want her on my bed. She finally adapted and sleeps on a doggie bed or a blanket on the floor next to me.

I think you're being too hard on the poor fellow give him a chance.
Have you ever owned a dog before?


Lou
 

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Most bassets, dogs and puppies, when introduced to new situations, need reassurance. This isn't unique to this particular dog; it would be necessary with almost any basset. You might need to modify your expectations a bit during this adjustment period. Some of our rescues have slept beside us, either on the bed or floor, with a hand on them, the first few nights they've been in our home. It doesn't go on forever, though. If you can get through the adjustment phase, he should get a bit less needy. Good luck--you're doing a really generous thing by accommodating this poor fella. :)[/b]
I agree with Betsy.

If this were me, I'd try putting the nice soft bed you got him next to your bed tonight .Put his leash on so he can't wander off his bed, and give him something to chew on. When he tries to jump on the bed, push him down with a firm "off"- then praise him. Maybe leave a hand on his back for reassurance.Ignore whining and fussing (after making sure he doesn't have to pee).

I brought Murray home 5 years ago to 2 agressive dachshunds who wanted to kill him. Really. I remember going upstairs after a few hours of turmoil, lying on the bed, and thinking "What have I done!" It got better.

You are probably going through the worst of your misgivings right now. Things are different in your home at the moment. You are both adjusting to a big change, but remember that YOU ARE SMARTER THAN HE IS.

I'm thinking of you and hoping for the best! Good luck!
 

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Snoopy has separation anxiety and we have had him 5 years now. Both of ours have slept either in our bed or the dog bed in our room since we got them and we aren't allowed to shut a door unless they are on the same side of the door as you are. All the transports I have done the dogs have needed a little extra love and attention also. The one overnighter I did, he came running into my house and right up and into my bed. If it was me (not judging you), I would be putting different sheets and bedding on my bed til I made a permanent decision. Now I don't like sleeping with all the hair in my bed at times, but the love we get from our houndies sure does make it more bearable. To me having a dog is like having a permanent 2 or 3 year old, not quite self sufficient, still has potty accidents on occassion, wants to be around you 24/7. and sees you as their hero.

Good LUCK.
 

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Rudolph is back at HOP.

If you know of anyone who can help this guy please ask them to. He should not suffer because of what humans have done to him in the past. But at the same time he is in a situation that is not good for anyone.
 

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Vision, I'm sorry it didn't work out.

If anyone else would be willing to try Rudolph, he really is a wonderful old guy who just wants love (and no other boys in his home). His story is here: http://houseofpuddles.org/rudolphs_page.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That poor dog has been so neglected he is barely manageable. And he is a terror at the HOP. The place is alive with bassets and every time he passes a male it gets intense; even if you are in between them. It happened at least three times in the 5 minutes I was there.

He needs a detached home with a crate so the SA can be dealt with. I hope Marilyn mentions the SA in Rudolph's page. Looking at him as I was driving him back, thinking of all he had been through and how it was playing out to his detriment, was not fun.

Do all bassets have SA on some level or does it come from neglect?
 

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I think for you to say that Rudolph is barley managble is unfair. His aggression toward other males is an issue that can be managed and Marilyn has made it very clear that he should be in a home with out another male dog. Also the issue of him following you around could have had alot to do with the fact that he was in a strange place with a strange person. Also I have 4 bassets and they all follow me around and stand outside any door that I am in wanting to come in , it is just a bassets nature to want to be with their person. I am sorry that this didn't work out like you wanted but please don't label this dog as unmanagable because he is completely managable with the right person.
 

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I agree with copsmom too. And it's not just a basset behavior - every dog I've ever had wanted to be with us. A few sleepless nights are almost guaranteed when you bring a new animal to live with you even when the dog hasn't come from an abusive or neglected background.

It takes time and patience and understanding to help a dog to adjust to new surroundings. I really don't think a detached house would be the answer to separation anxiety.

I'm sorry it didn't work out with him. I sure hope he is able to find a good home soon. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've owned two dogs(not bassets) and never saw anything like this.

I guess we all have different ideas of what is manageable. That's what I call the marking, growling at other dogs, pawing into my back seats(which stained them) and couch, and the screaming need to be next to someone all the time.

Hey don't take my opinion. How about you talk to me neighbor who wanted to know what was going on as I went to get my cell phone from the car.
 

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Let me start off by saying I do not think you are the right person for Rudolph but you were aware of his issue with other dogs when you agreed to this,second the marking could be fixed with training and I am sure his need to be near you had alot to do with the fact that he was scared and confused. Knowing you were going to have a dog at your house if you were concerned about your furniture or car seats you should have covered them with a cover. I personally don't think you are ready for the responsibity of any dog but all I am saying is don't make it out that this dog is so bad and ruin his chance of finding a good home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Again, I've owned two dogs. One a lab and the other a collie mut.
 

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How long did you have Rudolph for? It is not uncommon for any adult dog to show anxiety in a new situation like this. You also have to keep in mind that in his previous life he had a companion 24/7. I adopted Rosie & Tucker almost 3 years ago, they were a bonded pair (sibblings) and always had each other. Even so, they were understandably nervous and unsure of what was happening in their lives. Rosie cried at night for a few weeks (they were not allowed in my bed at first) but each night her crying got a little less until eventually it stopped. Rudolph has had a lot happen to him in a short time and to expect him to be perfect right off the bat after all of that is just not right.

I too think it's unfair to label him as "unmanageable" when it doesn't sound like you gave him much of a chance. About the other two dogs you had in the past, did you get them as puppies?
 
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