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Discussion Starter #1
Ok,

I have come to the conclusion that a crate is the best option.

My question is which size? There are only 74 different sizes.....
 

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Hmm.. well they are still small, so don't get one TOO big or else they might poop or pee on one side and sleep on the other. Definitely give them one where they have enough head room and to where they can move and roll around in their sleep with the satisfaction of ease.
They'll need new ones once they get to that size. Hank has gone through 2 size kennels already in his life time. The one he currently has is pretty big now and gives him plenty of room to stretch out
 

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There are some crates that come with a divider so you can limit puppy to small area. You don't want area so big that they can eliminate at one end and sleep at the other end. Then when your baby grows you can take out the divider and you have a large area for your grown dog. Check out Amazon. Good luck :)
 

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Hmm.. well they are still small, so don't get one TOO big or else they might poop or pee on one side and sleep on the other
I reccomend getting a crate big enough for the dog when it is full size. Many crates come with dividers you can use to to make the crate small enough for a puppy and keep expanding as the puppy gets bigger. At the worst you can simply stuff the crate with boxes to fill up the excess space as well. The size of the parents sire and dam are the best indication of the adult dog females ten to be about 10 lb lighter than males of the same litter as adults. A 36" long crate works well for an adult dog that like to curl while sleep while a 42 or 48 works better for a dog that likes to streach out. the Think in I think puppies ten to sleep streached out more than teir adult counter parts so I don;t thing ther is a strong colrolation to how a puupy sleed and how it will sleep as an adult so the adult sleep preference is a bit of a crap shoot.
 

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Also remember that fustration is good, It is what motivates people to train their dog, without fustration there would be a lot less dog training happening,
 

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One onther thing What ever the surface is like that they have been having accident on in the house I want to make sure the the crate does not mimic that as it will make having accident in the crate more likely. If the dog is peeing on carpet I would not want a soft fluffy dog bed in the crate opting for a plastic airline crate with a hard soild floor. If the dog are going on hardwood , tile etc then you do want a soft pad in the crate. You want the substrate in the crate to discourage the dog from going.
 

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I agree with Mikey T in regards to crate size. You'll save money in the long run if you get one that will be big enough for their projected size. When Virga got bigger she got the crate that Doppler had outgrown. We got lucky in the fact that my in-laws bought both of the crates that the dogs are in now. But Doppler's crate is 42 in long and Virga's is about 36 or 38 in. I can't remember. But both of them sleep stretched out on their sides so we needed crates with length.
 

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Onike other breed width and hieght of the crate are not real issue. if you get one long enough it will be wide and tall enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was thinking about one that is 37"L x 24.5"W x 28"H

The mommy is not that big maybe 35lbs. I can only imagine that the daddy is much bigger as bessi seems to be bigger boned than her sissy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Another option I have is getting one large crate (either 42" or 48" long) and using it for both dogs. I read that Midwest makes a crate that you can divide in half and it opens on both ends so you can store more than one dog.

Thougths??

I do not want to mess this up as it looks like it is going to be around $150 or more no matter what choice I make.
 

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I have two hounds and two crates. My adult hounds' crates are 36" long by 21" wide by 23" high. Lots of room--more than they need. I could easily go with a crate one size down, and am planning to do so next time I buy crates. Do check into the crates with dividers so you can expand them as needed. One crate per hound will save you money in the long run--they'll each need one eventually.
 

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I read that Midwest makes a crate that you can divide in half and it opens on both ends so you can store more than one dog./QUOTE]


Hmmm, that would be good made-for-TV ad.

"Tired of not having enough room for storage of your dogs? Then this crate is for you! It's the dog crate that stores not one, but two, yes TWO dogs!

"How does this amazing system work? Just open one door, and coax your dog in. Shut the door. Open the other door, and coax the other dog in. Shut that door. Next, hook up the hose from your vacuum to the...(pssst, wrong commercial).

"Call our toll-free number in the next 15 minutes and we'll throw in an extra divider so you can store...wait for it... THREE dogs! Oh, heck, why not, we'll even send you the third dog for free! Just pay $150 for shipping/handling.

"If you aren't fully satisfied with your crate, don't bother calling to try and return it as we will just laugh and hang up the phone on you."
 

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If you haven't tried Cherrybrook,give them a go ,sometimes they have really good prices on things.The measuements sound too small they aren't going to be this small long.
 

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We started out with a 22 or 24 inch long crate that I picked up at a yard sale for 5 bucks. About a month ago, we were given a 36 inch long crate from my sister-someone had given it to her but it doesn't have the bottom. So we took the bottom out of the first crate, put it in the front half of this one, and then stuff the back with blankets to make Flash comfy.

The 36 is HUGE for his 4 month old self. However, the 22 was small-he was laying diagonally to stretch out, and his poor butt and head were crammed against the wire sides :( But as the length goes up, so does the height and width of the crate, so they look a ton bigger than the previous size.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you haven't tried Cherrybrook,give them a go ,sometimes they have really good prices on things.The measuements sound too small they aren't going to be this small long.
36" long sounds too small? Should I be looking at the 43" L crates?
 

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36" long sounds too small?
depends on the dog Macey is over 50# and not a small female by any mean but perfers the smaller 30" crates to the larger ones. Toughy who was about the same size need a 42" or longer cause he liked to streach out Macey does not. My harrier that is just shy of 50 lb absolute favorite crate is the beagle crate approx 12x18x 18 he stuff himself in there tighter than 20 college students in a phone booth Contrarry to many insituting humane law many dogs want a crate that fits them tightly the feel more secure so Bigger is not always better. The problem is it is very difficult to predict what a puppy is going to prefer as an adult. Make your best quess and be prepared to adjust if need be when the dog gets older.
 

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So far you it look at you are looking at metal crates. A few thing to keep in mind about crates is you need to consider how they will be used.

For example if you are going to use the crate as a training tool al la " crate games" not simply as containment to assit in house training then actual a plasic crate is a better choice because the solid back work bettter when trowing food into the crate. Plastic airline style crates also is more secure in prevent spills/ liquid from escapling then the trays in a metal crate. They are also much lighter. They do not offer the same amount of ventillation and or visibility but being to see out is a double endged sword as well with an active puppy reducing visual stimuli general help in getting the pup to calm down and rest which is generally what you want when the dog is in a crate IF you need to transport a plastic crate it is a giagantic pain they take up a lot of space compared to a folding metal crate.

Metal crate are available fold and ridged. Foldiang crates are muck more convienent for travel/using at a location out side the home. The are not a sturdy. there have been reports of injury and death with dog that manage to unlatch the side panels and get wedged in. There are metal crate made from alluminium much ligher than steel but you pay a premium price. There are even crates the use frabric beside being cheaper the are ligher and colapse for easy transport they certainly not as secure and the offer no protection from accident

There is no perfect crate the closed I ever saw were Nylabones folding plastic crates the where just about the perfect compromise The giant problem they are no longer made. If you can find a use one or two i would pick them up . I believe they were ~ 32 inches long which was fine for all my dogs except Toughy.
the large 32”L x 22”W x 24H” I see where one went on ebay for $315 for a crate that sold for ~80 new.



I would avoid using a single crate even if the dogs a seperated by a barrier. Part of the purpose of the crate beside confinement is to get the dogs to rest. If they are next to each other they will play even through the barrier and this activity is coing to make accident in the crate much more likely and less helpful in house training.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
depends on the dog Macey is over 50# and not a small female by any mean but perfers the smaller 30" crates to the larger ones. Toughy who was about the same size need a 42" or longer cause he liked to streach out Macey does not. My harrier that is just shy of 50 lb absolute favorite crate is the beagle crate approx 12x18x 18 he stuff himself in there tighter than 20 college students in a phone booth Contrarry to many insituting humane law many dogs want a crate that fits them tightly the feel more secure so Bigger is not always better. The problem is it is very difficult to predict what a puppy is going to prefer as an adult. Make your best quess and be prepared to adjust if need be when the dog gets older.

As always, great points!

I guess that is why we have craigslist!
 
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