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Step 1: Give your dog to someone who actually gives a shit.

Step 2: See if you can ride a unicycle across the nearest interstate. Bonus points if you're blindfolded at the time.

Step 3: ???????????

Step 4: The rest of the world profits.
 

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Step 1: Give your dog to someone who actually gives a shit.

Step 2: See if you can ride a unicycle across the nearest interstate. Bonus points if you're blindfolded at the time.

Step 3: ???????????

Step 4: The rest of the world profits.

Thanks bradandnorm! Someone just asked me the other day...."What happens when you give an idiot a computer?" Now I know. :p
 

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Just because one person (or 20 people) believes a dog should be an equal member of the family, or should be fed only organic food, or should sleep in a bed, or should be wearing little pink tutu's around the house does not mean it is the "right" way to own a dog.
Both you and the OP are indulging in the same type of hyperbole. Not one person in this thread has said anything remotely resembling the above, just as I never suggested that a dog must sleep on the bed or relieve itself in the house. Please re-read.

We are pointing out that her dog seems to need more social contact than he is receiving, and apparently more than she is willing to provide. Her most favored solutions seem to involve other people doing things - the husband/local kid walking the dog more, the nanny letting the dog in earlier, the neighbors providing playmates. Hence the suggestion of many of us that this dog and this household are ill-suited for each other.
 

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Just to chime in a bit here...
Not exactly a Basset Hound expert, but it seem to me all the trouble explained are the characteristic of what would a Basset do during growing up.
I pretty much have encountered those behaviors at least once in regards to my Basset, Gus.

What I learned from Gus is the fact that I have him not just as a fulfillment of my life... but I also have to be responsible of meeting his needs as a basset. Basset is a dog that demands a lot of attention.. But, this is also one thing that made them very social and have a lot of personalities.
So, with that in mind, a good basset owner is normally a very adapt and creative trainer.

Here is one example:
there are multiple times, Gus tried to sleep on my bed. Knowing that a Basset have a pack mentality, I realized that it is quite a normal thing for a basset to want to sleep 'close' with their pack leader.
But, since Gus lives in a human society.. He needs to learn that in his pack, sleeping on his human leader's bed is not allowed. This is very 'abnormal' in the dog's world. So, in essence, I am asking him to break his dog instinct. I realized that I am asking a lot from him. But, I want him to succeed in learning this 'weird' rule.

I learned that, every time I ask Gus to sacrifice one of his instinct, I have to give him an incentive or a better alternative to that instinct (just like in life: in order for you to receive, you will also have to give).

So, I got him a very comfy dog bed so he does not feel the need to sleep on my bed.
I also put his bed next to mine. By doing this, I compromised my human rule with his needs to be with the pack.
Then, the training regiment starts. Sleeping on the dog bed will result in lots of praises and rewards, while sleeping on my bed will caused a stern NO from me and a ticket out of my room for a short period of time. It took him a good month, but Gus finally got the idea.
From then on, I slowly moved his bed an inch further each passing day.

After a while, Gus finally learned that sleeping by himself is not a big deal. He now actually prefer sleeping outside of my room on his dog bed. But, once in a while, he would come into my room at night to sleep next to my bed (this is fine by me.. as long as he does not jump on my bed).

So:

  • The problem -> Sleeping on my bed
  • The Goal -> having him to understand that it is not ok to sleep on human's bed.
  • The Compromise -> giving him his own comfy bed put next to mine
  • The training -> redirecting his need to sleep on my bed into his own bed and slowly move the dog bed further apart
  • The tools -> cookies as reward. Stern voice and Time out as the punishment.
Problems usually comes from having:

  1. Unrealistic Goal (For example: wanting your puppy not to behave like a puppy, wanting your puppy to learn in an instant, and wanting your basset not to chew things or not to sniff his nose on the ground).
  2. An owner who is unwilling to compromise (For example: unwilling to fulfill a basset need to exercise daily, unwilling to stick through with the training regiment because it took too long to make the dog understand).
I think if the owner keeps having those unrealistic goals or unwillingness to compromise, either the dog or the owner will be the one who is paying a hefty price. Unfortunately, in most cases, it will be the dog.

I do share the sentiment that Basset should have an access to indoor 24/7.
If this is an absolute no for you, perhaps, a Basset Hound is not the perfect dog for you.
 

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I agree with dodola's last sentence.... and if you want a dog that stays outdoors, get yourself a Collie or similar outdoor type of dog and let your Basset Hound go and live with a family who have more time and companionship to give to him!
 

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Just to chime in a bit here...
Not exactly a Basset Hound expert, but it seem to me all the trouble explained are the characteristic of what would a Basset do during growing up.
I pretty much have encountered those behaviors at least once in regards to my Basset, Gus.

What I learned from Gus is the fact that I have him not just as a fulfillment of my life... but I also have to be responsible of meeting his needs as a basset. Basset is a dog that demands a lot of attention.. But, this is also one thing that made them very social and have a lot of personalities.
So, with that in mind, a good basset owner is normally a very adapt and creative trainer.

Here is one example:
there are multiple times, Gus tried to sleep on my bed. Knowing that a Basset have a pack mentality, I realized that it is quite a normal thing for a basset to want to sleep 'close' with their pack leader.
But, since Gus lives in a human society.. He needs to learn that in his pack, sleeping on his human leader's bed is not allowed. This is very 'abnormal' in the dog's world. So, in essence, I am asking him to break his dog instinct. I realized that I am asking a lot from him. But, I want him to succeed in learning this 'weird' rule.

I learned that, every time I ask Gus to sacrifice one of his instinct, I have to give him an incentive or a better alternative to that instinct (just like in life: in order for you to receive, you will also have to give).

So, I got him a very comfy dog bed so he does not feel the need to sleep on my bed.
I also put his bed next to mine. By doing this, I compromised my human rule with his needs to be with the pack.
Then, the training regiment starts. Sleeping on the dog bed will result in lots of praises and rewards, while sleeping on my bed will caused a stern NO from me and a ticket out of my room for a short period of time. It took him a good month, but Gus finally got the idea.
From then on, I slowly moved his bed an inch further each passing day.

After a while, Gus finally learned that sleeping by himself is not a big deal. He now actually prefer sleeping outside of my room on his dog bed. But, once in a while, he would come into my room at night to sleep next to my bed (this is fine by me.. as long as he does not jump on my bed).

So:

  • The problem -> Sleeping on my bed
  • The Goal -> having him to understand that it is not ok to sleep on human's bed.
  • The Compromise -> giving him his own comfy bed put next to mine
  • The training -> redirecting his need to sleep on my bed into his own bed and slowly move the dog bed further apart
  • The tools -> cookies as reward. Stern voice and Time out as the punishment.
Problems usually comes from having:

  1. Unrealistic Goal (For example: wanting your puppy not to behave like a puppy, wanting your puppy to learn in an instant, and wanting your basset not to chew things or not to sniff his nose on the ground).
  2. An owner who is unwilling to compromise (For example: unwilling to fulfill a basset need to exercise daily, unwilling to stick through with the training regiment because it took too long to make the dog understand).
I think if the owner keeps having those unrealistic goals or unwillingness to compromise, either the dog or the owner will be the one who is paying a hefty price. Unfortunately, in most cases, it will be the dog.

I do share the sentiment that Basset should have an access to indoor 24/7.
If this is an absolute no for you, perhaps, a Basset Hound is not the perfect dog for you.
There is a lot of good advice here. When I first got my dog Daisy, a beagle, i tried to make her sleep in a dog bed and she hated it and got up at night and whined and had accidents...I thought it was bad training. I decided to try a kennel. I'll never forget it! I brought it in, and she was jumping to get it...which she never does. I set it down and she ran inside, and immidiately rolled all around inside, on her back, and finally eneded up laying to face me wagging her tail, She sighed once and fell right to sleep. Daisy LOVES having a DEN. Dogs are not just pack animals but they like to think of their sleeping area as a den, and the pack sleeps together in the den.
SO, my point is, at first when I got Bowser, my basset, he wanted to be with me all the time and be on the bed. But for a week or so I put him in the "den" with daisy and now he has his own and can't wait to get into it at night when it's "bed time". I say "up-staris, go to bed!" and they each run and get into their respective kennels, and get the door closed for the night.

Oh, so after my ramble, my point is even though I was raised to think dogs should be outside, this is a great alternative that works for all of us. Maybe Oscar can sleep in the house, in the kids room? or hallway or your bedroom if you don't mind, in a kennel, and he will be quiet and his anxiety about being away from the pack will go away. It's all about the proximity to the pack and the comfort and security of the den, and the pack.

Really Bassets have a strong instinct to be in the pack. All dogs do, but bassets a lot! Kind of like border collie's are bred to be herders...that's just the natural "wolf" and pack instinct to herd and catch their kill! Anyway, point is you can make his anxiety and desire to be part of the pack work for you. Bowser was afraid to jump through a hula-hoop (daisy does it for food LOL) but when i took the food away and just told him to go through and come to me, he did it. He wanted me more than he wanted food! And so we were able to train him : )

Okay, well that's my 1am rant done for tonight!! hehe
 

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To Oscar's Mum

Hi I thought it was brave of you to get a puppy at the same time you have a toddler - one yet alone both require a significant amount of time, attention and energy, especially for the first couple of years.

As parents, sometimes whilst we may even be in the same room as our child or dog, that doesn't always equate to us actually spending time with interacting with them.

To me and from what I have read, it sounds as though Oscar needs more of your time and attention. With a new bub on the way, in a couple of months, it is difficult to imagine you being in a position to give Oscar the time attention Oscar needs (and and I believe many other dog's of Oscar's young age would need), probably less. And I can't see the situation improving then. Maybe you have to be really honest with yourself and as you're struggling now with working, meeting the needs of a toddler and Oscar, ask yourself how you are intending to manage with a newborn as well. Perhaps you have just taken on too much.

If you are comitted to making things work with Oscar, here's a couple of suggestions for you to consider between now and when your new baby arrives:-

Could you not set your alarm for 6:30 each day, as opposed to 7am in the mornings and dedicate 30 mins to taking Oscar for a walk/play in park/off leash area. It would be great if your partner take Oscar for a walk in the evenings or vice-verca.

I'm a bit confused as to why Oscar is put inside when the nanny and your other little one go and play outside in the garden. For a basset hound this would be really hard to take and seen as being ostracised. Perhaps this could be a good time for Oscar to be outside enjoying a bone (lasts longer than chicken wings). Does he have a toy that when thrown he likes to fetch - perhaps this too could be an opportunity for another form of exercise/social play when your nanny and son are outside. Or that you and your husband could do of an evening.

I wish you luck in reaching a place where your relationship with Oscar progresses to one whereby you and your family can all enjoy and find mutually rewarding; and where both your and Oscar's needs are being met.

All the best!
 

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I agree with Soundtrack. Please try to find a good home for your Basset pup. It's hard to imagine a good future for him with your family. Sometimes, even with the best of intentions, things like this happen.
 

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I know exactly where you are coming from... but beware! My basset is almost 5 and he is super spoiled and is TERRIBLE around children. I dont have children of my own but my fiance does and he is so aggressive towards them. He will charge at the gate when they walk by and he will growl... they havent done anything to him but I clearly lost control somewhere along the way with him. We also have a 3 year old yellow lab and we spent the first 6 months of the yellow labs life at the vet because Beamer (basset hound) attacked him all of the time.... this leads into fights with my fiance because he wants to get rid of Beamer. I need help to - I wish Beamer liked children - I want to have a child somesday but I dont know if that is gonna work with my present situation. I grew up with a basset hound and he didnt have an aggressive bone in his body. If there is anyone out there to help you, I hope that they can help me too. Remember a happy dog is a tired dog!
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
One thing you guys need to understand is that I am from South Africa. It's hot here, it doesn't snow, and it's got loads of open spaces.
I do not know one single person or family whose animals sleep inside.
It's not the way it is here, and it's perfectly normal to us. If I had to go to someone here and suggest they keep their animal locked up in an apartment or house all day, they would say that is cruel.
I think that's where the main communication gap is coming from here.

When you have a puppy, it sleeps indoors, then you get the kennel and they sleep outside. They cry for a night (or maybe 2 hours) and then they love the outdoors.

This has been true of every breed or animal that any of my family or friends have ever had. We don't have crates. When I asked the pet store about it, they looked at me like I was on mushrooms. I googled some info, and to me, the crate thing is cruel. I can't cage my dog, and to us, indoors is a big cage to an animal, except at social time.

So Oscar is the first Basset that me or anyone I know has ever had, and he turns out to be a very needy, social, demanding breed. If I had a farm, I would have 4 Bassets, all outside and I'm sure they'd be happy and be terrific friends and have loads of fun running the farmland and exploring and chasing crickets and ducks. But I don't stay on a farm anymore.

I do love Oscar, but I can't give him more than what he is getting now. I can't give anybody more than I am now. Being a young wife and mother and TV Producer, I can't take on more. I love animals and always had loads of them.
I did find another person here that had Bassets. He had 2. He said he had to give them away because they were too disobedient. Maybe they're just not suited to Africa. Maybe they should have stayed in packs as hunting dogs. Aren't they working animals?

Thanks again for all the advice and for those who were understanding and helpful.
Here is Oscar again, he really is a handsome guy. We'll have a family meeting about it and decide what is best for HIM.

Natasha Clark | Facebook
 

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Re the OP's last message, Bassets don't care whether it's Africa, America, England or Timbuktoo, as long as they are well cared for and given affection, food and walks, they are happy wherever they are... it's maybe that you and your lifestyle are not really compatible with owning a beautiful young Basset Hound. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
Sophie you sound like a bored, bitter old woman with nothing to do but sit and comment and attack other people and their Bassets.
Can you leave me and Oscar alone? Your approach is very aggressive and confrontational and unnecessary. Back off, go away, go take care of your own dog. I'm sure he/she is starving for attention while you're online about other people's dogs all the time. Maybe pay more attention to your own.
People come here for advice to better their relationships and health of their dogs. Not to be attacked about their lifestyles or to get personal with you.
Please leave me alone now, it's really not your place.
 

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Natasha, over the last few years I've considered moving to Africa. When people asked "What about Lightning" I only half jokingly replied "Africa has enough problems." :p In my trips to southern Africa I've yet to see the first basset. I think, given the differences in the ways dogs are kept, I can understand why bassets are not popular over there. I'm sure some people on this board will jump all over me for saying this, but they are a needy breed. If that doesn't suit your lifestyle or what you want from a dog, there is nothing wrong with saying this dog is not for me. Just please make sure he goes to a good home.
 

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Sophie you sound like a bored, bitter old woman with nothing to do but sit and comment and attack other people and their Bassets.

I am not old, bored or bitter and I have never 'attacked' other people and their Basset Hounds... in fact, quite the opposite... just look back through my posts!

Can you leave me and Oscar alone? Your approach is very aggressive and confrontational and unnecessary.

I am neither aggressive (rather too soft according to a lot of people) or confrontational, in fact I always try to avoid confrontation!

Back off, go away, go take care of your own dog.

All of my dogs (3 as they adore company of other Bassets) are very well loved and better looked after than some people I read about!

I'm sure he/she is starving for attention while you're online about other people's dogs all the time.

My dogs are usually near me when I am on the PC, especially if I am on the laptop at the kitchen table beside their 'kitchen bed'. They also have a bed in the hall and one in the lounge and I am not online all the time... at 8.8pm, this is the second time I have turned on the PC today... the first time was for about five minutes when I sent an email to my sister who has two huge Munsterlanders and two Springer Spaniels, all of whom are well cared for and live indoors!

Maybe pay more attention to your own.

If you knew me, you'd know that my dogs get plenty of attention and thankfully I have never had the need to go on a website to ask for advice and then have a go at people who try to help, like you are doing!

People come here for advice to better their relationships and health of their dogs.

If you look back through your messages, you will see some conflicting information. People try to give you some advice (after all, you did ask for it) regarding your lack of time spent with your Basset Hound plus having a child and one on the way, meaning even less time to devote to your dog, then when several people reply saying it might be best if you find someone with more time to look after your dog, you don't like it!

Not to be attacked about their lifestyles or to get personal with you.
Please leave me alone now, it's really not your place.
I shall 'leave you alone' with pleasure and I have no more interest in your topic but I'm glad that it is me looking after my dogs rather than you, especially as they live 'with' us, not outside and they enjoy three or four walks every day and get out to meet lots of other dogs and people and are very happy, sociable, much-loved members of our family!


Here's a quick pic of two of my well cared for, laid-back Bassets!

 

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One thing you guys need to understand is that I am from South Africa. It's hot here, it doesn't snow, and it's got loads of open spaces.
Just a bit info. I am from California (essentially, it is a desert). So, it is also hot and we don't have snow.

If I had to go to someone here and suggest they keep their animal locked up in an apartment or house all day, they would say that is cruel.
I think that's where the main communication gap is coming from here.
No one telling you to lock your dog in a house all day. We are suggesting to give him access 24/7 to indoor and backyard. So, he can freely go in and out if he wanted. A dog door can be a simple solution.



This has been true of every breed or animal that any of my family or friends have ever had.
I think you contradict this with your own answer here:
So Oscar is the first Basset that me or anyone I know has ever had, and he turns out to be a very needy, social, demanding breed.
you probably need to consider changing the term every into some breed but not all.

We don't have crates. When I asked the pet store about it, they looked at me like I was on mushrooms. I googled some info, and to me, the crate thing is cruel. I can't cage my dog, and to us, indoors is a big cage to an animal, except at social time.
Well, lets not go there because a discussion about crate being cruel or not can lead to another big discussion. I think the most important thing here is to deal with Oscar's issues of being deprived from being with his pack.

If I had a farm, I would have 4 Bassets, all outside and I'm sure they'd be happy and be terrific friends and have loads of fun running the farmland and exploring and chasing crickets and ducks. But I don't stay on a farm anymore.
Exactly! you know why those 4 bassets will be happy and terrific? Because they ARE in a PACK together day and night. Imagine this situation.

You have 4 bassets. But, you allow only 3 of them to be indoor at night and leave only one basset locked outside. Do you think that one outdoor basset won't go crazy looking at his friends sleeping inside? Even worse, those three basset would probably bark and howl asking you to let the left behind dog in.

But, lets come back to reality, Oscar doesn't have three basset friends. Oscar have you, your husband, and your kid.
and you took his privilege as a pack member and separate him at night by himself. hopefully, you should be able to know why he always barking, begging, and whining at your window asking you to let him in.

I do love Oscar, but I can't give him more than what he is getting now. I can't give anybody more than I am now. Being a young wife and mother and TV Producer, I can't take on more.
This is the key answer to your dilemma. I have no doubt that you love Oscar. But, I do think that Oscar is not suited for you. No matter how much you love Oscar, I think the biggest love you can give to him is to actually give him up to a family who can better care for Oscar.

I did find another person here that had Bassets. He had 2. He said he had to give them away because they were too disobedient. Maybe they're just not suited to Africa. Maybe they should have stayed in packs as hunting dogs. Aren't they working animals?
It's not that they are not suited to Africa. It's because the owner is not suited to care for a basset. The reason for a disobedient dog can almost always be traced to the owner. Many people forget that a dog of different breed has different needs. A Basset should have stayed in packs (just like any other dogs). Basset normally is more social and needy than other breed.

Oscar is indeed handsome and I believe your decision to give him up to a loving family is the wisest choice.
 

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Dodolah... what a sensible person you are... your explanation of the 4 Bassets in the pack and moving 3 inside is spot on!

How could anyone not give this gorgeous Oscar, access to the rest of the 'pack' family 24/7... look at those soulful eyes! :cool: :D



Edit: Look at the huge number of views this topic has received.... over 1,400 people have looked at it!
 

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You know..

I do understand where Oscar's Mom is coming from, really. I was raised to think dogs should be outside. I grew up with three beagles on LEASHES outside. In the rain, in the sun, in the wind. They had dog houses, and that was it.
Having grown up and now having my own dogs, i actually have cried thinking how lonely and separate, and sad that my dogs had to be like that, growing up. BUT at the TIME i was not sad for them, because that is how It just WAS.

I guess I mean, now I wouldn't dream of keeping my Bowser and Daisy outside. We have a dog door, and they each have a kennel, and the LOVE their kennels. I Tried keeping Daisy out of one when we first got her and she hated it. She rolls around it in and LOVES it and so does bowser.

Anyway, I do think it's fair she came here for understanding about her dog's behavior. Just telling someone "that's wrong and it shouldn't be done that way!" is a bit harsh, since you don't know their circumstances. 15 years ago i didn't know ANYONE who had an animal in the house. Maybe a friend or two who had a cat...but everyone i grew up with even had dogs outside.

Anyway, I think things got a bit out of hand here. She knows now that there are alternatives, and she knows more about the needs of the breed. I hope things can be adjusted for Oscar's happiness...and really he is ADORABLE. If it doesn't work out I'll take him! LOL
 

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Sophie you sound like a bored, bitter old woman with nothing to do but sit and comment and attack other people and their Bassets.
Can you leave me and Oscar alone? Your approach is very aggressive and confrontational and unnecessary. Back off, go away, go take care of your own dog. I'm sure he/she is starving for attention while you're online about other people's dogs all the time. Maybe pay more attention to your own.
People come here for advice to better their relationships and health of their dogs. Not to be attacked about their lifestyles or to get personal with you.
Please leave me alone now, it's really not your place.
Sophie has posted nothing but helpful advice for you. If anyone sounds old and bitter, it's you.

I am starting to wonder if there is even really an Oscar or if we're all just getting trolled. I am a moderator on some other non-dog forums and I would've locked this thread a long time ago.

Honestly we should just let this thread die.
 

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You have a 10 month old puppy who is not getting any attention except bad attention and he is willing to settle for that. A dog that is not incorperated into a family is doomed for failure. He is exceited to see everyone,anyone,who will acknowledge him ,good or bad. You should have started him a crate when he first came home.(hindsight) Now,you are dealing with two toddlers. I don't think too many of us is feeling as much sympathy for you as we feel for the puppy because with a little knowledge you could have avoided the whole situation you are in now, by deceiding not to get a puppy at this time or taking the time to spend with him and train him. Whatever he is doing is not his fault. Have you asked the breeder to take him back, somehow I suspect he didn't come from a breeder because a breeder with any sense at all would have been able to tell you were not ready for a dog. Don't trade this one in on another breed because the same thing will happen and you will wonder why all the dogs you pick are boneheads. Turn him into a rescue and count this as a lesson learned.
What a rude awful thing to say! What is the matter with you? The only bonehead is YOU! Get off your high horse, the woman is asking for help. And further more what breeder gets that close to someone? How the f would she have known? I think you, CLEARLY, have other problems going on and need to stay away from giving people "advice". Maybe there's an "i hate Trump" rally going on that you could join instead! Lol✌
 

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I shall 'leave you alone' with pleasure and I have no more interest in your topic but I'm glad that it is me looking after my dogs rather than you, especially as they live 'with' us, not outside and they enjoy three or four walks every day and get out to meet lots of other dogs and people and are very happy, sociable, much-loved members of our family!


Here's a quick pic of two of my well cared for, laid-back Bassets!

What a little snoot- snoot you are! Wow, your better, your bigger, your the best Bassett Hound owner and your dogs are perfect and they go on 4 walks a day, oh my, Boy what do you want a metal? A park in your honor? Do you have any idea the stress it causes to deal with this? The anxiety? It's awful. Have you ever dealt with a baby that had colic? Cuz that's what it's like. It gets to be so heavy and exhausting....especially with a baby. I thought it would help but it just made it harder on me and I've had 4 Bassets. Why don't you try and relate instead of judging. Humble yourself and gain a new perspective. Seek first to understand-
 
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