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It has nothing top do with him being outside, it has to do with taking a social animal and shutting him away from his "pack". If you were sleeping outside with him he'd be quite happy out there. I give up. I recommend finding the dog a new home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
He isn't shut away. He is only alone at night when we are asleep.
Perhaps you should read the posts properly before passing poorly informed comments and judgment on other people and suggesting they give their animals away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
I am not "shutting him away" by letting him sleep outside. Silly lady. That's your personal preference.

I can just see you on the phone now: "Hello yes officer, there's this crazy lady out there that makes her dog sleep outside in a kennel instead of in her bed. Please remove that abused animal off the premises straight away".
Really now.
 

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When we first got our basset it took a lot of adjusting because he needed to be around people. That's one of the things that may not have come across as keenly in research...I internalized that he would be clingly, but i really didn't imagine he would want to come give me hugs and get pats BEFORE eating breakfast, even if it's already in his bowl. He will follow me upstairs, to the bathroom, in the kitchen, where-ever. Bassets are just about the most social dogs (and socially needy) that there are. Which is why a lot of sites say they are good for kids...the love people, and are totally easy going.

So, the solutions are: Be with your basset all of the time, or get another dog he can bond with.
Frankly i try to be with my basset as much as possible because i love him to pieces and he's my little furry child : ) but we also have a beagle named Daisy, who also didn't like being alone, so when we need to go out for a few hours or when I worked long days, they were okay being together.

If you're not willing to have companionship for a needy animal, it may be hard to hear but it may not be the right environment for him. I've been around a lot of dogs in my life and most can be taught and will adjust unless they have issues...but bassets are just flat out social dogs. They LOVE being with people and are horribly sad if they are alone.
Sorry...maybe you can find him some companionship during the day? My mother-in-law used to babysit daisy for us when she was lonely. : )
 

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I am not "shutting him away" by letting him sleep outside. Silly lady. That's your personal preference.

I can just see you on the phone now: "Hello yes officer, there's this crazy lady out there that makes her dog sleep outside in a kennel instead of in her bed. Please remove that abused animal off the premises straight away".
Really now.
Your dog can sleep inside your home without being in your bed as mine aren't... I don't even allow them up the stairs as it's bad for their joints! My dogs have two beds in my warm cosy kitchen and another in the lounge and one in the hall and I wouldn't fream of having them in the bedroom but some people do and that's their choice!

Do you not have a hall or a kitchen with a corner for a nice comfy bed so that your dog can feel part of the family rather than an 'outcast' who cries to go inside at 3am and 5am to come inside? :( Maybe his kennel needs to be more comfortable for him so he doesn't mind being there... but if I were you and couldn't have a pack animal as part of my family 'pack', I'm afraid I would be trying to find a kind person who wants a dog as a much loved family member!


PS: Just noticed this from one of your posts! "I've asked the nanny to let Oscar in for play about an hour before we get home. That way I figure, he won't be as over excited when we walk through the door.
My husband took him for his walk last night.
Also, there's a lovely couple in our neighborhood that have two gorgeous Beagles. They're always telling us to bring Oscar over for some play."

So you not only leave Oscar out all night but you leave him out all day too!!!!!:eek: Why can't he spend time indoors in the day with the nanny... how will he ever be socialised properly if he's shut away alone all the time?

The neighbours with the Bassets probably are like me and feel sorry for Oscar and hopefully he will enjoy playing with their Beagles!
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Jaleely, that is the best and most helpful response I have ever received regarding Oscar.
Thank you so much. I understand him better now, which will help me in tending to his needs and making us all happy.
Oscar also follows me everywhere. First I thought he just wanted food or was bored and I could not understand what he wanted. Because I'd sit and play with him for an hour, and he's just had a walk and eaten and I would get up and go to the bathroom and he would be following me, sniffing around. So I thought he wanted food, or maybe separation anxiety but now I am understanding that he just wants company 24/7.
I don't want to get another dog right now, but there is a pair of Beagles that live about 3 houses away and their owners are always begging me to bring Ozzie to play there. So I think more walks, more training, more understanding and patience and more playgroups and socializing with other doggies.

The nanny and my son are at home with him all day as companions, so he is not alone in the day at all, never has been.

Thanks again for helping me understand and thanks to those with the constructive comments xx
 

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He isn't shut away. He is only alone at night when we are asleep.
Perhaps you should read the posts properly before passing poorly informed comments and judgment on other people and suggesting they give their animals away.
But you have said elsewhere he is outside during the day too because you have said you will ask the nanny to let Oscar in for an hour before you get home. Your dog must be so bored being alone all the time, I'm surprised he doesn't try to find a way to escape to a life where he's part of a family! ;) Could you not get another Basset to keep him company?


Bassets are a very sociable breed who hate being left alone. Three generations of my family have had Bassets and always two or three at the same time and all have been very happy hounds!
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
My son and nanny spend almost the whole day in the garden. My child isn't locked up indoors the whole day. They play outside and water the garden and my son has a slide and splash pool and sandpit. Like children like to do. Do you not have children?
They go inside in the late afternoons and have dinner and a bath and story (do you really need me to explain this to you?) and tidy up. During this time, Oscar is outside doing his own thing -napping, chasing birds -whatever. I thought maybe if the nanny let him inside a this time too, then it would be better.
If you read my posts properly, you would have seen all this.

And no, I'm about to have another newborn. I can not think of a worse time to get another puppy.
My dog is not alone all the time, the only time he is alone is at night when the family is asleep.

Why would Oscar try to escape? We don't hold him prisoner. What makes you think he is unhappy? You don't even know him. He is so happy and eager it's like he is going to wag his own tail off. He's just untrained, young, energetic and eager.

You really are not making sense, please don't feel the need to respond, I have all the information that I needed, thanks to a handful of very helpful and understanding people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Sophie you really are being dramatic. Please calm down. I think you're upsetting yourself over something that you're completely over-reacting about, and over a situation that you don't even understand.
My animal is not neglected or shut out, she just sleeps outside in a kennel at night, and is put outdoors while we have dinner. Please calm down, and read the posts properly before over-reacting.

I won't be commenting on this further, as you're not making sense, and I have all the info I need.
 

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You might not feel you are shutting him away by leaving him outside at night and when you aren't home. But to a pack animal, if they are not able to be at your side, they are being shut away. If that weren't the case, he wouldn't be so excited to come inside.

My dogs are not allowed on any furniture but are always allowed inside 24/7.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Oh dear Kriska, can't any of you read?
Ok I tell you what. I'll put Oscar INSIDE, in the house during the day while my son and nanny are playing OUTSIDE the whole day.
Yes that makes loads of sense. Thanks for the excellent advice.
 

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Oh dear Kriska, can't any of you read?
Ok I tell you what. I'll put Oscar INSIDE, in the house during the day while my son and nanny are playing OUTSIDE the whole day.
Yes that makes loads of sense. Thanks for the excellent advice.
I was referring more to leaving him outside while you are inside sleeping, unless you sleep in a tent in your backyard?

To quote you:
3am:
Oscar is playing with chew toys / blankets / destroying pillow or other, loudly, outside our bedroom window.
We are only trying to help you understand the root of the problem. But since you've decided to resort to insults, I am done helping.
 

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This thread has gotten very emotional, for better or worse it does show one thing - We LOVE our dogs. I have enjoyed seeing the range of ways people have pets in their lives, from people (like us) who have dogs on their beds and furniture to people who keep a more firm line between pets and people.

I suppose it's like breastfeeding and natural child birth, everyone has vehement opinions on it but the end result is there are lots of healthy and happy kids handled both ways. Personally my dogs would think they were being killed if we kicked them off the bed or couches, but that's because that is the way my house works. I expect there are plenty of happy pooches in much different family arrangements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
your solution

Your solution is for me to give my dog away because he sleeps outside at night. You say this will solve his behavioral problems. You say this will teach him to "sit, stay," etc.
So you think if Oscar lived in a house that he was allowed to sleep indoors, then all his problems will go away.
You make out like I am abusing him because he has a kennel and is requested to be outdoors at meal times. This does not make sense to me and is not good advice. You say I "shut him out" and he isn't part of our family because he sleeps outside at night. That is personal. Telling me to give a member of my family away is personal.

It is the same as co-sleeping and breastfeeding and natural birth and all those options. Your criticism is not constructive.
It is emotional and personal for a complete stranger to tell me to give my dog away because I don't seem to love it.
It's an awful thing to say to someone and not your place.

Please just leave us alone and stop your comments. You're being really mean and it's not necessary.
 

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My boy Lightning was out of control for the first 18 months or so. One thing that is crucial for dogs like that is that they get mental stimulation as well as physical. If he knows basic commands, run through them with him at least twice a day. Sit and stay are great to work on at dinnertime when you don't want him begging. Bassets are very intelligent and can learn a variety of commands and "tricks". Get creative with what you teach him. Make it a game for him and your family. And I agree that letting him sleep in a crate in the house will help him and you. But obviously you've got a dog that is craving attention and stimulation. If he continues to "misbehave" I think it would be best for your family and for the dog to rehome him. They are not a breed that deals well with being solitary. And his definition of solitary is obviously much different than yours. I wish you luck with him.
 

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I am afraid the OP is someone who asks for advice but only wants to hear what they think is correct:confused:
My thoughts too Vonny... and she thinks none of us can read as well... but there are a few conflicting things she's posted so I'm not sure that she knows what's going on herself! :confused:

Does this animal look abused or unhappy to you?
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Thanks again for those that gave me super great advice, and good luck with all your beautiful Bassets x
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I see no dog.... so I've no idea if Oscar is unhappy or not but I know that my gang would be downright miserable if they were shut outside!
 

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Wow - I cannot believe some of the posts in this thread. I think everyone needs to calm down and realize that there are people on here from all parts of the world and each is entitled to their own beliefs.

Just because one person (or 20 people) believes a dog should be an equal member of the family, or should be fed only organic food, or should sleep in a bed, or should be wearing little pink tutu's around the house does not mean it is the "right" way to own a dog. As long as the dog is loved and treated humanely, there is nothing "wrong" with the way the owner is keeping the dog. I'm a little shocked and dismayed at the number of you that suggested she get rid of the dog. There are already too many in the world that are abused, neglected and homeless. While many of you might not think it's the ideal picture perfect home, this dog has one, and they love him and that's good enough for me.

Oscar's mom came here because she desperately needed advice on how to deal with Oscar. Instead of judging her because she has different beliefs than some of you, how about offering advice based on her beliefs and capabilities? Just because it's not how you would care for your basset does not mean it is "wrong".

She obviously loves the dog and wants to make it work. So based on what I've read and without any judgement, here are my suggestions to Oscar's Mom:

I'm sure you've learned from the other posts that bassets are very social and food oriented dogs. I would ignore the crying, barking in the morning. When the basset has been quiet outside for 5 or 10 minutes, I would let her (I think you said the basset is a girl) inside, give her a few treats and spend a minute or two telling her good morning and giving her some affection. Hopefully within a few weeks she will associate being quiet with getting to come in and get a treat and will start quieting down.

If the nanny is up for it, allow the dog to be with her and the child as much as possible during the day. If they are outside, so is she. If they go in for a bit, try letting her go in with them. They usually just love being around people whether they are included in the activity or not. Ask the nanny to give the dog some affection during the day when she has a spare minute and try involving the nanny in the training process with clear instructions on what the dog is allowed and isn't allowed to do and how to correct any unwanted behavior.

I think hiring a neighbor kid to take her for occasional walks and the beagle play dates sound like an excellent idea and should help her get some exercise.

When do you feed your dog? You mentioned that her food bowl is outside. Is there always food in it for her to eat whenever she wants to or do you feed her at a certain time of day. If you need her to be outside while you are having dinner, I would feed her at the same time. When you are ready to eat, tell her it's dinner time, take her out and feed her, then come back in and enjoy your dinner. If there is always food in the bowl, there is no incentive for her to go out and behave for a bit while you eat.

When you are ready for her to go out a night, tell her it's bedtime and give her a few treats after she walks outside. Try not to be overly affectionate at this time as she will just want more attention. Try putting up her toys at night so she can't play with them and put them back out in the morning.

Try to be consistent in establishing a routine for her to follow and she will probably respond to it in time. She's still a puppy with lots of energy and will calm down with age. But that might be awhile. If you are still having these problems after establishing a consistent routine, hiring a trainer to come to the house and help might be a good idea.

I think some of the posts on here had some good advice for you and I hope your situation improves before the new addition arrives.
 

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Just re read the original post and I guess Oscar is a boy, not a girl. My mistake. I just had a couple more thoughts. Do you have curtains on the doors that lead outside? If Oscar can sit at the door and look inside and see everyone, I'm sure this makes him anxious. Try closing the curtains or hanging up a blanket while he is out so he can't see in and doesn't feel like he's being ignored.

You mention that you can't pet the dog without him becoming overly excited. I found this information on a dog training site.

"
If your dog is still a puppy -- or a small dog -- Bend down to them -- Bend down and pet your dog. Do not kneel down to the dog's level - just bend from your waist. While you pet your dog keep a light pressure so he can't jump. Don't say too much - and keep walking. If you are talking overly excited - the dog will continue to jump. Also if you are yelling or saying No or Down - you still sound excited to the dog.
Even if your words are saying something negative - "No" or "Down". Your dog is hearing excited words and he/she is thinking you are just as excited as he is! We don't want the dog thinking this is OK - so many bad behaviors are reinforced because owners don't realize their excited words are exciting to the dog.
If your dog is very excited -- bend down pet the dog and then put a toy in his/her mouth - then continue to walk.
As the dog calms down - you can go over and pet them some more - but - don't be talking in a very excited voice - keep your voice calm, pleasant and loving."​
 
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