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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Hi BeerBasset, I'm not going to give up on him. Everything you guys are saying is helping and encouraging. I know it's not his fault that's why I asked "What am I doing wrong"? I think I just expect him to know not to do certain things like my other dogs did. I forgot all their training so many years ago and got used to them as they were, fully trained, and assumed they were like that all by themselves. Silly of me really.
I could never send him away, I was just particularly frustrated this morning and exhausted and resenting Oscar for the 5am wake-up again and feeling so guilty for the neighbors. My son was perfect, slept through from the beginning, never cries, is very chilled and calm, no hassles at all. Everyone always said "watch out, the next baby is going to be a nightmare." Then I got Oscar instead :) My baby sleeps through the night but my basset wakes up about 3 times. How bizarre!
 

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A crate is a not the igloo it is a container with a door. They come in many sizes, a wire kennel/crate is square with a door. Like a little den for him. Any pet supply place should carry them.Taking him to training school is great,you will learn how to teach him. I admire that you are not ready to give up. I was fostering a rescue once named"Rocky". Rocky was 2 years old, he would get on the end tables and lamp stand,knocking things over,he thought if I had food it was his and he would just bulldoze me to get what he wanted. No wonder this guy was in rescue since he was less than a year old, everyone else had just given up on him,no one took the time to teach him manners he had to raise himself. It took time but he responded, he got to know what I expected of him.He wasn't perfect when he went to his new home but he was a lot better than when I got him. This isn't going to happen over night but you will see differences eventually. He is still a puppy probably with the attention span of someone with Attention Deficit Disorder like me.:rolleyes:
 

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at 10 months oscar should be sleeping through the night try the crate either in your room or somewhere in the house that feels comfortable for him let him play and get use to it throught the day the first few night he may cry for a while but as long as he has relieved himself prior to going to bed and has an empty bladder you know he doesn't need to go out let him cry and in the morning take him out asap and use lots and lots of praise eventually he will love his crate bassets are strong willed but mean well
 

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my lil girl will be 8 yrs Nov.25th and to this day she refuses to play with toys all she ever once is attn. i now have an 9 1/2 month old english mastiff and sometimes i wonder who is the puppy he will go outside and do his business as soon as he goes out she will not go unless you turn your back go inside or scratch her belly annoying yes at times but i know that that is just her personality house training was the hardest thing to teach her
 

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Wish I was not on Blackberry, I'll try to add more detail later.
Dogs on their own in a yard will not exercise themselves, they need to be taken out. A walk three times a week and a run on the weekend is not enough.
Dogs in general and Bassets in particular are highly social animals, he wants in to be with his family. Yes, have him sleep inside at night, train him to behave during dinnertime or crate him. Chewing things and stealing food cannot happen if he is being properly supervised.
He needs obedience classes - not just one set of beginner classes but continuing until he responds reliably.
You said you bring him in in the evening while you are working or watching tv. That is not giving him attention. While he doesn't need to be the focus of your every waking moment, he does need SOME one on one, undivided interaction. Training, playing a game or teaching tricks are all good activities which burn off energy, establish control and build a relationship.
He is an adolescent - lots of energy and testing his boundaries.
 

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All puppies are high energy, my 11 week old Molly is the same. I teach college and do much of my prep work at home, so I am there with Molly for most of the day. Believe me when I say that a day without a trip to the park or some other place besides the back yard makes Molly very bored. We've been having a lot of rain here, so I resorted to taking her to Petsmart just to get her out and about. In addition to the park, she goes to "puppy parties" that her vet holds every other week and she is in puppy kindergarten (to make sure we curb bad habits early - jumping, biting, learning to walk properly on a leash, etc). Puppy kindergarten is also good for socialization and well worth the money I spent. Bassets need lots of interaction and lots of time and patience when they are babies (as do all puppies). I am learning this as I go along. So I agree, perhaps Oscar need a family that can give him all the things he needs. Puppies are like having babies and the commitment really needs to be there for everyone - puppy and family - to have a happy life together.
 

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My advice if you have the money to spare is to hire a trainer. Obedience classes will help but you sound like your situation is pretty dire. A trainer working with you and the dog in your home would make a huge difference. You want someone who will work with you, not just your dog.

For a "humane" punishment, try spraying him in the face with water when he does something very bad, like knocking over your son. Based on what I've read in this thread it sounds like you are past the point of ignoring bad behavior. Remember though that reinforcing good behavior is the most important aspect of training.
 

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It sounds like you love the little guy. He also sounds like a typical adolescent puppy – testing every boundary. All other breeds are just as stubborn, but the basset seems to excel at it. I don’t know if you mentioned when Oscar started the crying at night. If it’s relatively recent, your best bet may be to wait it out. (A LOT harder than it sounds, especially if all you want to do is sleep). Even if you’ve let him inside the house once while he was crying will just reinforce that behavior and make it harder to teach him to stop.

All I can really say is patience patience patience patience and consistency.

I like the idea of getting a neighbor kid to take the dog for a walk a couple of times a week. It’ll burn off some of that puppy energy and give him some exciting new places to sniff out.

I’m also not a fan of sleeping with the dog in the bed. I am allergic to dogs, so I like the idea of a “dog free” bed. We’re currently crating Squishy at night, but I’ll have no problem with her on a pillow or bed on the floor in the bedroom. She just won’t be allowed in my bed. Crate / Pen / Cage / Kennel – used as a house training tool since dogs don’t like to soil their dens. Kind of like the igloo you have, but with a door so they can’t get out. Some puppies take to it very well – other’s cry a bit more. We got Squishy from a breeder that crated the puppies at night. Even the very first night with her at home, she went right into her new “bed” without so much as a whimper.

Have I mentioned patience yet?

Several months ago, my fiancé’s father feed Squishy an entire BOWL of vanilla ice cream. They called me into the room to tell me how much she loved it – her face and eyes were covered. But her tail was wagging and she was so happy. I was furious, but hard pressed to not laugh at her. Thank goodness there were no stomach issues from that. But for a long time after that, anytime we would have dairy out she would go absolutely crazy; barking/crying/whimpering/running/jumping psycho puppy. She’s normally well mannered, but when the dairy would come out of the fridge/freezer, we’d have a different dog on our hands. At first, I would just put her in the back yard. But this didn’t stop the bad behavior. It prevented it from happening, but it didn’t correct or address it. So I started teaching her to be calm when the dairy would come out. It took several months (I started with just cheese outside, then cheese in the kitchen , then at the table), but we’re now at the point where I can sit on the floor and eat ice cream / cheese without her jumping all over me. But this took weeks of patience. Now she just sits and stares at me like she’s starving but she won’t dive or jump on me. This time was also spent on the “leave it” command. Which before the Ice Cream Incident ™ worked only on kibble and treats (But not cheese). Now it works on the food so gets over excited about. It was a good exercise in impulse control for her.

The point I’m trying to make (the long way, I guess), is that bad behaviors are very hard to get rid of. They need lots of patience, reinforcement and consistency. The easy way to stop Oscar from stealing your son’s food would be to not allow the dog around while your son is eating. But that doesn’t address the behavior, it just prevents it from happening. (Which can be enough on a busy night!). When time permits, I would look at it as an opportunity to teach your dog some impulse control and manners. But this won’t happen overnight and takes some time. I didn’t realize it right away with Squishy (I was so very annoyed that I had to train her not to go psycho over dairy because my father-in-law fed her something off limits), but now Squishy knows that if she so much as touches me when I have food or jumps or gets too anxious/excited, there is absolutely no food reward. This behavior eventually translated well to dinnertime and playtime. She still comes running for the food, but won’t do anything other than stare at you and drool. But it took me 2 months to get rid of a behavior that took 5 minutes to create. She still gets a lick (or two or of my face) of ice cream as a special reward, but only if she very well behaved. I also learned that my dog will learn to do just about anything for a piece of cheese.

I know you want Oscar’s behavior to change right away, but you really have to go slowly with patience and love. I was so angry at the “ice cream incident” and at the change in my puppy’s behavior that I wanted it to correct itself overnight. But it didn’t.

I don’t know what you’re doing in the mornings with Oscar; but if it was Squishy making that kind of noise in the morning I wouldn’t let her into the house until it stopped. If she saw/heard that I was up and about and was at the door barking and crying I would stand there and wait for her to calm down before letting her inside. (I would probably give her a piece of cheese if she did it quickly J). My rule of the house would be, “Only calm and well behaved puppies get let inside in the morning.” This’ll teach her that being calm and waiting patiently will get her inside the house with you. But this may take a few weeks before it goes smoothly.

Yikes. I think I went a little crazy, but once I started I guess I couldn’t stop! :)
Good luck!
 

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A note on the begging at the table issue - We saw right away the infamous "counter surfing" behavior with our BBB (big beautiful basset), so we made a firm rule that no handouts from the table ever. This was an adjustment for us as we have a couple chihuahua mixes that we had spoiled and regularly gave handouts to. It took a bit of patience but eventually the BBB has figured out that she doesn't get food from the table. Now when we eat she lays on an ottoman in the livingroom and looks at us mournfully, but she knows we won't give her anything so she doesn't jump up. If you leave food on the table and walk away all bets are off, and that from the sounds of things is something we will always have to remember. Bassets are ruled by their stomachs! PS. This has been good for the other two pooches as well, one of them now just lays under the table but my dog Kiko dances around on her hind legs for the whole meal. She's not ready to give up yet.

Also, I know everyone is split on this issue, but I really couldn't imagine not having our dogs sleeping with us. The BBB is my daughters dog, so everynight she says "C'mon Cannoli, bedtime!" and Cannoli heads for the bedroom. She has a dog bed beside her bed but usually when I poke my head in there in the morning to take the dogs out the BBB comes out from under the covers. Our other two dogs sleep in my bed. I know it's not for everyone, but I'm just giving you a snapshot of our lifestyle.
 

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I don’t know what you’re doing in the mornings with Oscar; but if it was Squishy making that kind of noise in the morning I wouldn’t let her into the house until it stopped. If she saw/heard that I was up and about and was at the door barking and crying I would stand there and wait for her to calm down before letting her inside.
This is a very good point. By letting him in when he's making the noise, you're rewarding the noise. He will need to learn that the only way he will be let inside is by sitting and waiting patiently.
 

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I have just read your first post and just saw that Oscar is crying etc OUTSIDE your bedroom window!!!! CRIKEY... poor Oscar, surely you do not leave your poor Basset outside all night!!!! :eek: :(

3am whimpering outside your window and again at 5am? I'm shocked to hear this and find it very upsetting!!!! :(

What's the point of getting a dog to leave outside. A Basset Hound is a very sociable animal and likes to be with his family and if I'm honest, I feel you don't really like Oscar very much and maybe he'd be better living somewhere else where he is loved as part of the family and not stuck outside on his own.

Aww poor Oscar. He needs some love, affection and some nice walks every day!
 

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I am afraid that he sounds a very bored lonely pup.
Bassets love attention and are not happy being shut outside on their own all day,they love to be part of the family.
They need exercise and stimulation and do not do well if left to their own devices.
I have three Bassets and after an hours walk they will then sleep the morning away quite happily.
I cannot see Oscar's behaviour improving unless he is allowed to spend more time with you so that you can teach him the correct way to behave in the house.
If you are not able to do this it would probably be better to rehome him as he will get bigger and stronger and even more boisterous.
I agree with you Vonny, Oscar needs to be part of the family NOT SHUT OUT ALL DAY AND NIGHT!! :eek: To me that is absolutely SHOCKING... and it makes me wonder if he's just 'outside' and does he have a warm cosy bed to sleep in or is he just 'outside' in all winds and weather with no comfort.

PLEASE FIND OSCAR A NICE HOME WITH PEOPLE WHO LOVE HIM.... he deserves it.

By the way, haven't you posted messages here before with some sort of 'problems' with pups or am I mixing you up with someone else?


Edit: I have just read in one of your messages that you RESENTED Oscar for some minor thing.... no matter what any of my Bassets have ever done, I could never ever resent them, no matter what!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Sophie, my dog needs to sleep outside at night. Of course he has a warm kennel (igloo) and all of that.
We used to have him sleeping in our bed as a pup and it really didn't work for us.
We're a young married couple and need our privacy in the bedroom, if you know what I mean :) Not even my children sleep in my bedroom, and that's just personal preference. He is a dog, at the end of the day. A beautiful one that we love very much, but dogs and other animals belong outdoors in nature. Not on my couch or in my bed.
Resenting Ozzy was for the anxiety he was causing by his constant howling and barking.

But in good news, last night and this morning went much better. I woke up to the howling at 5am, then waited until about 6am once he had stopped. Then I went through and let him in to the house. He tried to get in to bed with us a couple of times, but then settled for the pillows on the floor.
He loves following my son around and they cause SO much mischief together.
Eventually I found them both in the bathroom, destroying a loo roll together. My son with the bulk of it and Oscar with a string of the stuff hanging from his mouth. They both froze when I walked in and tried to look as innocent as possible, the whole bathroom scattered with bits of paper : )

I've asked the nanny to let Oscar in for play about an hour before we get home. That way I figure, he won't be as over excited when we walk through the door.
My husband took him for his walk last night.
Also, there's a lovely couple in our neighborhood that have two gorgeous Beagles. They're always telling us to bring Oscar over for some play.
So we're going to do those playdates starting this weekend, more frequent walks and letting him in in the morning.

I tried having him indoors as we had dinner last night, but my son throws food down off his high chair for Oscar. He loves feeding people and things, then doesn't end up eating himself, and it teaches Oscar bad habits and expectations, so it's outside at dinner time I'm afraid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Danish I really loved your comments and advice! Thank you so much.
Oscar also goes crazy for milk, which is a nightmare as I have a toddler walking around with a milk bottle half the time. But he seems over it now. He kinda lost interest by himself, thank goodness.
LOL I know what you mean by "psycho puppy". Sometimes Oscar does this thing where he frantically runs around the living room and jumps from couch to couch then outside and repeats this about 17 times. The whole houses just freezes in our tracks and we look at each other and say "nobody move. it's gone insane."

It's frustrating that it takes so long to see results. I try and teach him to "outside" while I'm in the kitchen cooking, because I'm so pregnant and always have my son in my arms... if I trip over Oscar I could really hurt all of us.
That's the next step. To get him to sit/lay in the corner while i'm bustling around. This will come in handy when I have the newborn too.
It just feels like the house is chaotic. There is no order, and there needs to be some sort of structure in a home. If my son does something wrong, he gets reprimanded and shown the right way. Oscar is the same. A family needs structure and routine, and I'm trying to enforce this.
My son is also naughty and likes to draw on furniture with permanent markers, bless his heart. Should I give him to another family too? My husband leaves his socks on the floor. Better get rid of him too.
 

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I do not know the layout of your house but is it possible to have a Baby Gates in the doorway so Oscar can see you in the kitchen but not be under your feet.
When mine were younger and naughty I used to give them 'time out' behind the gate to settle down before they came back in.
That is another thing a crate or pen can be useful for,also Treat Balls and stuffed Kongs are good at occupying naughty hounds.
 

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My son is also naughty and likes to draw on furniture with permanent markers, bless his heart. Should I give him to another family too? My husband leaves his socks on the floor. Better get rid of him too.
Nah, just put them out in the yard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Animals belong with nature, and trees and grass and sand and yes, even the scary wind that you seem to think they are so terrified of. So do humans, but we build shelters. Dogs have shelters called kennels, but they need to relieve themselves on soil and grass and not plastic litter boxes.
They are animals. It doesn't matter how much we try to domesticate them, they will still sniff bums and hump pillows and lick their balls and walk on all fours. They are different to us. They are companions and protectors and hunters and friends. Not children. They are not lower or less significant than us, but they are different, no matter how hard you try to make them your children.
Do Americans have more confined living arrangements without big yards and open spaces? Because here we have so much nature and fresh air and our animals run free and explore and investigate and aren't confined to houses. I can domesticate a horse or a pig in the same way but it will still sleep in a barn or in stables and not in my bedroom, sorry.
It's more cruel to take animals out of nature and lock them up in stuffy apartments all day and night, and allow them ten minutes outside a day for a walk. I prefer it the other way around, with more interaction with us and more training so there is more control.
Please don't make out like I abuse animals because my dog sleeps outside at night. That's really ridiculous.
 
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