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Hi all,

We thought we would pass on the good news. While the board was down we finally got to bring our new pup home (he came home to us friday april 3rd morning). For everyone that saw our last topic, showing the 2 pups we had to choose from we ended up going with the pup with the white stripe on the face, he was also the runt of the litter (he just seemed to be attached to us when we visted more so than the other). We have named him Howie! Anyways, the past couple days have been going really good, he has only had 3 accidents in the house thus far!, and just can't seem to get enough of us. The only thing he is not fond of is that we don't let him sleep in the bed with us at night :p.

We just wondered what type of puppy food people are suggesting. We would prefer to get something that isn't overly expensive but is not of poor quality. Right now we have him eating a mixture of canned food (Nutro natural choice Puppy Lamb & Rice formula), and some of the dry food that the breeder was using, and he seems to be liking it quite well. Just wondered what are some good dry foods for when we stop mixing canned food with it.

Any other info you think we should know will be greatly appreciated too, I am sure we will probably have more questions in time.

We will have more pics to show when we upload them onto the computer!

Caitlyn&Steve
 

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Nutro is a quality food. When it comes to dog food what works for one may not for another that is one reason I refrain from making brand recoomendation, only general guide lines. For basset hound I prefer a puppy food specifical designed for large breeds. THere are mainy orthopedic problem associated with larger dogs related to to fast a growth rate, over feeding and improper calcium and phosphorous ratio that can be minimized by follow my recommendation above.

Optimal feeding of large breed puppiesJennifer Larsen DVM, MS
Resident, Small Animal Clinical Nutrition
Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis

Keep in mind overfeeding any food is one of the most common cause of many of these problems.

Dog Diet Do's and Don’t's

According to Dr. Tony Buffington, Professor of Clinical Nutrition, Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine, your puppy can be fed a regimen of specific caloric intake compared to his body condition score (BCS), using a simple one to five scale, from overly thin to obese. Using manufacturer feeding recommendations as an initial starting point, feed your puppy to a score of two and maintain this weight until he's fully grown. ...

2 = Thin - Ribs easily palpated and may be visible with no palpable fat. Tops of lumbar vertebrae visible. Pelvic bones less prominent. Obvious waist and abdominal tuck.[/b]
This is much thiner than was typical in the past but recent studies have show the great health benefits from maintaining a lean body condition

for a visual chart see Puppy Body Condition System

Note! you are supoose to be able to see the ribs on a puppy
 

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Looking forward to seeing pictures of Howie!
As far as puppy food goes, there are so many brands out there, what works for one may not work as well for another. Just make sure you do the switch gradually so as not to upset your puppy's tummy.
 
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