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Discussion Starter #1
Sissy doesn't listen to asnything I say! She has no respect for me and is the Alpha female in the house. How do I get her to listen to me. I have tried the firm NO! She just keeps pushing my buttons. We were staying with family for a long while after our home sold until we found anoher gouse so I know she is mad at us for being outside. AShe has returned indoors fulltime but now it is like training her all over again! At least she is still a good girl and housetrained. She just won't stop jumping on me, mouthing, barking (if she feels I am ignoring her), she even growled at my husband because he told her to get down off of me. I am trying to be assertive but she thinks she is in charge! Any suggestions, I am considering obedience training! THANKS
 

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Obedience training sounds like a good idea. In the meantime, I would make her earn everything:for example,have her sit before you put her food down , give her a toy, or let her out the door. There are others on the forum who might be able to refer you to articles and web sites that can help you too. Good luck!
 

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You need hands-on help with this. Find a good behaviorist in your area and contact them. In the meantime, as Murraysmom said, Nothing in Life is Free. NO furniture privileges. Feeding time, before the bowl hits the floor, you need to demand a down or a stay. Treats are okay, but not til you get a sit. No cuddles-on-dog's-demand. YOU tell her to sit/stay -- then she gets a pat.

This is a situation with the potential to escalate very rapidly into something completely catastrophic. You are right to be concerned.
 
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I suffer from some of the same problems with Jasmine, and I've recently dug out my copy of "The Dog Whisperer", and am trying to implement her four basic principles of Amichien Bonding. We're giving it a go for at least a month to see what effect it has before I look to getting any serious obedience training for her. So, while I'm obviously in no place to give advice, you have my sympathy and can maybe take some comfort in knowing you're not alone. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She is great when food is involved. She respects my 3 year old more than me. We will be looking into obedience for sure. She has been in the house for about 2 weeks since getting the new house. If she wasn't so darn cute I would probably have kicked her outside by now. The othre problem I have is the new house's neighbors dogs are very aggressive they have broke 3 fence boards trying to get to our dog. She just could be stressed out. We have fixed the boards and spoke to the neighbor/jerk. He doesn't seem to want to deal with his 2 Cujo dogs. If they break any more fence boards I will turn him into our homeowners association or contact animal control. It just seems to be too much too soon for her. We have never had to be worried about her behavior until she was forced to stay outside when we moved. I think she is mad at us, but grateful to be indoors. Today she seems to be a little better. She's not mouthing me because I bougth some Bitter's End and sprayed in her mouth.
 

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I think routine=security for most dogs. It sounds like she's been through a lot of changes lately, so keeping her on a fixed schedule might really help: feeding, potty, walks, etc. at the same time every day. It sounds like the neighbor dogs might be stressing her out too, if it's possible to keep her away from them as much as possible it might help to settle her a bit. I think Aruuuu is right in pointing out that this type of thing can escalate- my suggestions are just a few thoughts from another dog owner, and talking with a behaviorist might be something to think about along with the obedience training- I really wish you luck with this and hope you keep us posted on how Sissy is doing-
 

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"Sissy doesn't listen to asnything I say! She has no respect for me and is the Alpha female in the house. She just won't stop jumping on me, mouthing, barking (if she feels I am ignoring her), she even growled at my husband because he told her to get down off of me. I am trying to be assertive but she thinks she is in charge!"

Let me guess hollering at her pushing her down and away don't work. The reason is the behaviors she is exhibiting are to get your attention and what are you doing? reinforcing the behavior by giving her attention. Second you are compounding the situation by assuming this is some sort of power struggle. It is not. The dog is not actively seeking power or authority. Trying to physically dominate a dog ussual makes things worse not better. First I will give you a few links to read that may help

Hard to Train? A look at "difficult-to-train" breeds and the reality of what shapes these canine minds.

Basically you must make it in the dogs best interest in listening to you. Basset can be great manipulator you must learn to be better
Why Not Take Candy from a Baby (If He Lets You?)
Examines manipulation as part of social life, and the dog's need for clear boundaries & leadership.

"She respects my 3 year old more than me."
I am sepculating but my quess is the dog has learned that the obnoxious behaviors gets your attention but fails to illict the same response from your husband or daughter. You would be wise in looking at how they interact differently with the dog than you do. Chances are when the dog does something obnoxious you get more hyper instead of remaining calm and detached along with inadvertently rewarding the behavior.


These obnoxious behavior are not a sign of dominance far from it it is a sign of a dog with little or no self control. self control can and must be taught.
TEACHING SELF CONTROL
Teaching your dog self control as the foundation for all other learning.

links for specific problems
Insights Into Puppy Mouthing

Quick Fix for a Jumping Dog

Barking

"She's not mouthing me because I bougth some Bitter's End and sprayed in her mouth."

Adversives can be one way to control unwanted behavior but they are not without limitations and drawbacks. In this case if the reason for the mouthing is to get your attention that need of the dog has not changed. If the dog then can not mouth you to get you attention it must do something else. Unfortunately it already has two other obnoxious behaviors barking and jumping up that it knows works so eliminating mouthing is only going to increase the other behaviors unless you teach the dog a less obnoxious behavior that still gets your attention. This is the most neglected part of training do not thing I want to stop the dog from jumping up, barking, mouthing instead think of how you want the dog to behave such as sit quitely.

Stopping Negative Behavior Positively
The first step in changing undesired behavior is to identify the behaviors that you want to change. Every time you interact with your dog, ask yourself, \"Is my dog doing something I want him to do?\"

The second step is to define what you want your dog to do. If your dog is doing something you don't like, define what you want him to do instead. It's not enough to say \"I want him to stop doing what he's doing.\" He could stop doing what he's doing and choose to do something worse - and then you'd have to stop that as well. It's faster to define what you want him to do from the beginning. For example:

I want my dog to hold a sit-stay while I prepare his food. (Not \"I want my dog to stop jumping on me when I prepare his food.\")

I want my dog to sit at the top or bottom of the stairs when a person is walking up or down.

I want my dog to lie quietly on a mat while the family eats dinner.

I want my dog to lie quietly on a mat when I have visitors.

The third step is to manage the situation so your dog can't do the behavior that he was doing instead of the preferred behavior. The dog was doing the undesired behavior because it worked, because it was somehow reinforcing.

For example, a dog jumps on someone as a greeting, even if the person yells and pushes him away. Why? Because the dog wants attention. If he doesn't jump, he was likely ignored. So he jumps, even if he is yelled at for it. Until you can teach your dog that jumping isn't reinforcing but sitting politely is, manage the situation by putting him in another room when the doorbell rings.

The final step is to train a preferred behavior. If you make the new behavior reinforcing and simultaneously make the old behavior unrewarding, the dog will quickly choose to do the new behavior.
The NILIF program is often viewed as a dominance reduction program. If it was it would be ineffective because the parts often identified as dominance reduction are not effect. Studies has shown eat first, no tug of war and the such have no effect on reducing aggression. What the other parts of NILIF program does is become an effective tool for the newer/novice trainer to stop inadvertently rewarding obnoxious behavior. It requires the dog behave politely before getting attention, For many owners/trainers such discipline is helpful.

I can not over estimate the value of training classes as a way to teach yourself how to train your dog. No two dogs are the same. Not every technique works with every dog. Having some that can evaluate the interaction between you and your dog is invaluable. The one thing is most owners are actual better off with newer style classes more sturctured toward basic manners than a class geared toward "formal" i.e. competitive obedience.

[ April 03, 2006, 08:01 PM: Message edited by: Mikey T ]
 

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If because of the other dogs or change in living situation the dog may not be getting enough physical exercise and or mental simulation. One can not underestimate the importance of these two factors in behavior. For many active dogs simple walk is not enough exercise they need an outlet that burns more energy. In confined spaces games like fetch and tug are good outlets.
If you are concerned about tug actual causing more dominance or aggression please read the following link by SF/SPCA Tug of War
Dog owners have been admonished for decades to never play tug of war with their dogs because of the risk of it increasing aggression and/or dominance in the dog. Even many dog resource people such as breeders, trainers and veterinarians caution against this game. This is partly a failure to discriminate between agonistic behavior (conflict resolution & defensive aggression) and predatory behavior. Also, many people have issues about witnessing intensity. Intensity is not aggression, however.
Played with rules, tug-of-war is a tremendous predatory energy burner and good exercise for both dog and owner. It serves as a barometer of the kind of control you have over the dog, most importantly over his jaws. The game doesn't make the dog a predator: he already is one. The game is an outlet. It’s intense, increases dog focus and confidence and plugs into something very deep inside them. The big payoff is in lowered incidence of behavior problems due to understimulation and a potent motivator for snappy obedience. There is a maxim in training: control the games, control the dog. It's also extremely efficient in terms of space and time requirements.
The above advantages are really no more than attractive fringe benefits, however, when compared with the primary reasons for playing tag and tug o' war and roughhousing with dogs. When played according to the rules, these games:
1. increase the level of control owners have over their dogs, specifically proofing control at times when the dogs are excited and worked-up and
2. motivate, build confidence and make the dog less aggressive, specifically improving and maintaining his bite inhibition.
Managing Your Dogs Behaviour
Burn your dog’s energy, both physical and mental! Tired dogs are well-behaved dogs. Teach him basic commands and tricks with treats, play fetch, tug and hide & seek with his toys, take up a sport like agility or flyball, get him out daily for walks & runs, trips to new places and give him regular opportunities to play with other dogs. If you work long hours, consider a walker, or day-care
Kong Stuffing Pointers
Dogs are animals that are genetically programmed to hunt for their food. Part of the reason there is such a prevalence of behavior problems in pet dogs is that they have so little mental challenge or work to do: their food is given to them for free. Zoos have had some success in decreasing behavior problems and improving the quality of life of many of their predator and primate species by giving them
problems to solve in order to obtain their food. This same environmental enrichment concept can be applied to domestic dogs, who thoroughly enjoy finding hidden food and unpacking stuffed chew toys.
another option is a Buster cube or similar toy
 
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I very frequently play Tug o' war with Francis (it's now one of the only games he can play because it requires no vision) I always won for the first few months but soon I started letting him win and now, I swear, he wears me down so much he usually wins without me letting him.
He learned the rules early and I think it's contributed to my positive handling of him on all other occasions.
I used a training book by the Monks of New Skete and it really helped a lot.
I think the key with most bassets is absolute consistency in all thing.
Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sissy is improving daily, better yet I am imroving. Thank you for all of your insight it is most helpful. She is barking and jumping for attention but is listening to a sit and lie down command so then she receives her belly rubs. Nudges now mean please play catch with me. I am really trying to understand her needs. Today we had a break in the rain so she was able to play outside. Mikey T, thanks for all the advice I will be putting it to good use! Already I am yelling less!
 

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Yelling Less? With my dog if I yell he gets more amped,"or your excited too". I learned calm controll is best, just like with kids. Maybe sissy is the same way?
Good Luck!
Joan
 

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It sounds to me as if she's trying to communicate with you and you don't understand what she's saying and she doesn't understand what you're saying. That could simply improve with time, as you learn to read each other's signals. For a long while after George got us, I had trouble telling the difference between "I have to go out" and "I'm hungry" and "my water dish needs to be filled" and "I'm bored and want some loving." Now we've got it figured out to the point where I can tell when he just wants a biscuit and when he wants me to fill up his Kong ball so he can play.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am certainly learning more about my Sissy everyday! Life is getting better around here. I feel like the Zen dog owner, patience is key. She is so loving and we aren't having issues with the dogs behind us anymore. She barked back and claimed her territory. The fence boards are fixed and all is better outside! However, she prefers the couch over her new fluffy bed. I really appreciate everyone's help and encouragement. We are understanding each other more and she is responding to calm commands. Everytime she obeys a command she is rewarded with a little treat and belly rubs! Her tail is a lethal weapon with all the wagging! I have a question, how much do your bassets weigh? Sissy's vet wants her to lose 10lbs, she is 4 years old in May and weighs 49lbs. I thought she was fine but the vet doesn't think so. She is very active, any thoughts?
 

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That's great news- congratulations! As far as weight, it's different for each dog depending on build, but I think when you stand over them and look down you should see a 'waist', and there should be some padding on the ribs but you should be able to see them slightly- someone else might be able to describe this better-
 
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It sounds like what I went through with Simon In my experience, afew private sessions with a good trainer was very helpful
When Simon would try to bite at me, I go in the other room, shut the door in his face for 30 seconds, If she is like him, she just wants attention so taking thayt away also, give her something else to do, instead of just saying no, make her sit
good luck the articles listed above i found helpful also
 

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I have a question, how much do your bassets weigh? Sissy's vet wants her to lose 10lbs, she is 4 years old in May and weighs 49lbs. I thought she was fine but the vet doesn't think so. She is very active, any thoughts?
 
My vet had told me, when Charlie first came home, that his weight was fine -- in fact, he was very thin and happily had to put on a few pounds. BUT keep in mind that a basset's overall build, i.e., how heavily boned he/she is, how much rib for length, etc., needs to be kept in mind. Can you post a pic of Sissy?
 

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Actual weight is meaningless when discussing whether a dog is overweight or not. just like humans one can be over weight and weigh less than a 100# and another can be thin at 250#

You must ascess weight by the dogs body condition the follow links will help Keep in mind #8 from the Corpulent Canine link below
The vet said that the dog was a good weight (or even underweight). I have asked many vets why they don't tell their clients that their dogs are overweight, and I always get the same answer: \"I have lost so many clients because they were offended when I told them their dogs were overweight that I just don't tell them anymore\". So please, don't be offended—it doesn't reflect on you personally.
When your vet tells you your dog is overweight. It is overweight. There is nothing good for the vet that can come from misinforming you. As keep in mind in studies even when give a purina body condition chart owners are still bad at ascessing their dogs weight
Purina® Study Confirms Link Between Body Fat and Certain Health Conditions
Other Purina research found that most owners couldn't accurately assess their dogs' body conditions. When owner and expert scores were compared, only 28 percent of owners characterized their pets as above ideal body condition, while 79 percent of the experts scored those same animals to be above ideal body condition. Dr. Larson says this gap is serious because pet owners are not likely to recognize that their pets are overweight and even moderate excess body fat may lead to problems.
Weight[/i]
Corpulent Canines?

Body Condition

“Do I Look Fat in This?” Is Fido Overweight?
 
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