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I am the proud owner of Abigail. Abby is a puppy mill/sanctuary rescue, she is currently 7 1/2 months of age and we have been together for a month and half. For all that she has been through, Abby is remarkably well adjusted. The main issue I am having is biting, When I am on the floor playing she gets excited and starts to bite, I try and have a toy ready to put in her mouth which works for a second, but then she gets into a sort of frenzy and just bites and bites. I have never had a biter before and this is beyond what I can handle. I love her to death, but I don't like her when she's like this, I hate being angry with her.
I am open to any suggestions, I just need HELP and lots of it.
 

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Insights Into Puppy Mouthing

Puppy Biting - Have Patience

Biting Pant Legs & Ankles

Puppy Adolscence - or Demon Spawn

Stoping Negative Behaviors Positively
One of the biggest myths I hear is that clicker training isn't good for stopping problem behaviors. Part of that myth stems from the belief that because clicker trainers don't use positive punishment, there are no consequences for undesired behavior. Of course there are! We just don't have to use fear, pain, or intimidation

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The first step in changing undesired behavior is to identify the behaviors that you want to change. Every time you interact with your dog, ask yourself, "Is my dog doing something I want him to do?"

The second step is to define what you want your dog to do. If your dog is doing something you don't like, define what you want him to do instead. It's not enough to say "I want him to stop doing what he's doing." He could stop doing what he's doing and choose to do something worse - and then you'd have to stop that as well. It's faster to define what you want him to do from the beginning. For example:
  • I want my dog to hold a sit-stay while I prepare his food. (Not "I want my dog to stop jumping on me when I prepare his food.")
  • I want my dog to sit at the top or bottom of the stairs when a person is walking up or down.
  • I want my dog to lie quietly on a mat while the family eats dinner.
  • I want my dog to lie quietly on a mat when I have visitors.
The third step is to manage the situation so your dog can't do the behavior that he was doing instead of the preferred behavior. The dog was doing the undesired behavior because it worked, because it was somehow reinforcing.


You won the Prize

Keep in mind the dog feeds of your excite ment level the more frenzied the dog gets the more slowly and calmly you need to move and react.

Biting and such behaviors are also and indication of a lack of self control teaching self control in one area often helps in others It has been my observation is is one of the few areas that dogs generalize training. I posted a number of self control exercise in A little help with games, training, keeping new pup busy please?
 
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