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I am new to this forum, but I have a question. We have a basset that is 2 years old, her name is Puddles. We are using a Male who is 5 years old to breed with. Rufus, the male is not interested in Puddles, he will sniff her for a second then turn or walk away, or she will wag her tail and wack him in the face. Either way he is not interested and just keeps walking away. Is it possible that he can't smell her, that his nose can't smell?? He is definitely not neutered, so I don't know what is going on. This is both Puddles and Rufus' first time, is it possible they don't know what to do, but shouldn't he show more interest??
Thanks in advance for advice
Kristi

[ September 24, 2005, 09:55 PM: Message edited by: puddles ]
 

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Thought I'd give you more infor. Puddles is for sure in heat, the vet confirmed this, and she is in her middle week. So, what's going on?
 

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I'm no expert, but I'd say you aren't either.
If you're asking such a BASIC question about breeding, you REALLY, REALLY should NOT persue this until you further your education on the subject!
Seriously.
Additionally;
Puppies are cute! But, there are so many dogs who already need homes. Unless both dogs have champion blood lines, please rethink the puppy idea! You need to be armed with knowledge before taking on such an endeavor. Pregnancy is risky (possibly deadly) business for the bitch.

[ September 27, 2005, 11:01 AM: Message edited by: Scratch & Sniff ]
 

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Sampson's Mommies (and others), without trying to be offensive, as someone who is dedicated to the basset hound I really feel that breeding is NOT an endeavor for the casual breeder. There are far too many bassets produced that:

1)Need homes, because their breeder either did not plan out how to place them, or did not screen homes carefully enough and sold them to inappropriate owners, or simply didn't support thier pups for life (are you willing to take responsibility and take back one of your pups if it needs a home, no matter how old it is (ie ten years from now?))

2) Have structural problems because their breeder did not know proper structure, did not know how to breed for proper structure, did not know about proper nutrition to support proper structure. Do you know what kind of diet will cause bone growth problems in young bassets? Do you know what to do if a young basset starts limping? Do you know what's meant by fiddle front, or out at elbow?

3) Have health/temperament problems because their breeder either overlooked such problems in their dog (either because they didn't test for them, or the dog was too young for them to show up, or simply didn't think it was a problem) or didn't know the health problems in the background of the dog and didn't have a knowledge of basic genetics. Have you done ANY of the health tests recommended by the BHCA health committee? Do you have any idea how genetic diseases are transmitted? Do you know the dogs in the pedigree and if they had any problems? Do you even know what they look like? Are you excusing a shy or aggressive temperament (oh, she was abused before we got her, the nasty vet/groomer scared her)? Temperament is a heritable trait.

4) Are mistreated, put to sleep, made to live outside or develop easily avoided health/bone problems because the breeder didn't know or didn't care to advise the owners and help them in the rearing of their pups. Do you have LOTS of knowledge about basic nutrition, training, behavior problems, growth issues in bassets etc and are you willing to be available to your puppy buyers to answer any and all questions they may have?

5) Do not look or act like bassets should, because their breeder bred their pet-quality dog that came from another breeder who bred their pet and so on, or or came from a long line of puppymill dogs. I've lost count of the number of people who've gotten a basset from such a source, then look at mine (long ears, large bone, loose skin) and wonder when their young basset will look like that. It won't! In my opinion, if you're not getting the features that make a basset special you might as well pick up a wonderful mix from the pound. After all, for most of us the first thing that caught our eye was "the look", then we discovered what a wonderful breed it is.

In my opinion, the only reason to be breeding is because you are trying to breed a high quality dog that will contribute to the breed. This means one that is at least good enough to compete in shows or field trials (and preferably is good enough to do both), has been tested for the basic problems most likely to affect the dog (based on it's breed and bloodlines), and has a solid temperament. Then you don't just breed to the first available male, but do your research and carefully select a male that has features that will compliment your bitch. Have you competed with your dog in shows or field trials, to prove that she is a superior specimen worthy of breeding?

Also, far too many people get into breeding without planning or much forethought, other than the vague notion that they would enjoy having puppies and might make a few $$$. Breeding, especially a breed like bassets, is involved. You need to carefully nurture, feed and supervise a pregnant bitch. Can you tell if she develops life-threatening pyometra? Are you able to watch her 24/7 during her last week of pregnancy so you are there when she whelps? Are you prepared to help her? She will probably need your help at some point. Are you prepared for the mess (blood, fluids etc.) and for your bitch to be discharging all over the place for up to two weeks after whelping? Do you know what to do if a puppy gets stuck? Do you know what to do if a pup is not breathing? Are you prepared for a deformed pup? A dead one? Do you know the signs of trouble during whelping? What if she needs a c-section (common in bassets)? Do you know how to look for a cleft palate? Can you watch them 24/7 for at least two weeks after whelping to make sure momma doesn't lie on them and crush them (it only takes minutes)? Do you know how to look for eclampsia or mastitis in the bitch? What if the pups get sick? What if the bitch dies or cannot nurse the pups? Do you have a place for them when they get too big for the whelping box? Are you prepared for a bunch of poop machines with teeth that mess constantly and chew like Pac-man? Where the heck are you going to put 8 eight week old basset puppies? What if they don't all sell right away? How long are you prepared to keep them? And there's lots more questions you need to think about before you even start!


I'll get off my soapbox now.

[ September 27, 2005, 01:51 PM: Message edited by: Soundtrack ]
 

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Need homes, because their breeder either did not plan out how to place them, or did not screen homes carefully enough and sold them to inappropriate owners, or simply didn't support thier pups for life (are you willing to take responsibility and take back one of your pups if it needs a home, no matter how old it is (ie ten years from now?))
Something that particularly irks me are backyard breeders who brag about shipping puppies all over the US. When the buyer in California has a change of heart, guess who gets stuck? Not the BYB in Mississippi or Alabama, that's for damn sure. No, it's always rescue that cleans up the BYBs' mess. :mad:
 

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Very well stated, Miriam! It's clear from the questions being asked that there is a definite lack of knowledge on the part of both these 'breeders'. Let's just hope Rufus never figures out what he's supposed to do!!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:
 
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Thank God for you guys who are serious breeders and able to answer these questions to educate people without offending them. Its hard work and not something to be taken up lightly. These people who are so excited to breed their dogs really should at least visit some of the rescue sites on line (or better yet, in person) and find out exactly what happens to the dogs that people weren't serious about. Many of them were owned by well-meaning people who weren't serious about what they would do when (if) problems arose and it was just easier to give up the dog and make it someone else's problem, rather than figure out how to handle whatever the problem was on their own.

If you can't answer what you would do in any of the instances outlined above by Miriam (Soundtrack), you shouldn't be thinking about breeding your dog. You should be willing to put in lots of time (and I mean months or more, not a couple of days) researching and learning before you should even consider it. You may not want to think it, but ill-planning (or no planning at all) is just another form of abuse.

Thanks for the thoughtful answers.

Janet 'n Twink.

[ September 27, 2005, 10:57 AM: Message edited by: Twinkie's Mum ]
 

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Miriam- Is there a way to make your information here available for the many new people and those who just like to lurk? I think you state it very well... without being offensive- which is a great feat! I don't know how all that works- as a FAQ or soemthing similar- but you are awesome and I would love to see this information stay around!
 
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I consider myself a "Basset person", most of my life is dedicated to the breed in innumerable ways, and I would never think about breeding. What an awesome responsibility. I can't fathom the work involved, the expense, the responsibility. the risk, etc., etc., etc.. I am so thankful there are people that can, and do, partake in this endeavor to better our beloved breed. Thank you Miriam et al. To all of the responsible Basset breeders, THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart. Take care, Belinda.
 

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Got to say,before I joined this group, I thought like Sampson's Mommies that it was perfectly acceptable to breed a dog, almost natural to do it,even though I didn't know a thing about breeding, thought I could just buy a book on the subject and let nature take it's coarse.I now realise that I was just 'totally ignorant' of the facts and am thankful that I choose to go with rescue rather than a female pup(which at the time due to my ignorance I could have possibly bred) Got to say though that I think vets are also at fault here.I've heard many people say'The vet says she is perfectly healthy to have pups' It doesn't seem to matter to some vets that the dog is pet shop quality,bought from a BYB or puppymill,and that the owner doesn't know a lot about breeding!!! And for a lot of people the vets word is GOSPEL!!!
 
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Just an addition to Sadeyes' thoughts on vets not discouraging breeding ... indiscriminate breeding means more patients for the vets. (I guess I never thought of it this way before, but it really does probably bring them more business.) Too bad, because they really are in a position to be able to educate people. A little "talk" and a look at both sides of the coin by a vet who is approached by someone who is thinking of breeding their dog could make a difference.

Janet 'n Twink
 

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The discussion of vets is a good one. Vets are in an excellent position to promote the advantages of spaying and neutering pets.

On the other hand, very few vets, unless they're breeders themselves, know enough about a breed to help a pet owner decide whether their pet meets the breed's conformation standard.

Additionally, with over 100 breeds recognized by AKC, very few vets know which specific genetic disorders each breed is at risk for, and they can't adequately counsel pet owners about genetic screens appropriate to the breed.

The breed's parent club is usually the best source of information about genetic screening for breeding stock. For Basset Hounds, that would be the Basset Hound Club of America (BHCA). BHCA's Health Policy lists the screens that bassets should have before breeding.
 
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Thanks, Betsy. I agree that the vets could be really helpful. If we could at least get people who are thinking of breeding to take a look at BHCA's site, it would be helpful. I know that seeing all the possibilities of things that could go wrong, would certainly cause me some "second thoughts."

I know that when I look at the dogs on the boards, its easy to see that there are "bassets" and then there are "bassets" and even though we love 'em, rescues, BYB pups, and all, its easy to see the wide variations in conformity. (I hope this post doesn't hurt anyone's feelings ... heck, I'm the proud owner of a half basset "bagel" that I love to no end.)

Janet 'n Twink
 

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Wow, I am so happy that I could come back from the death of my 4 year old son hoping that I could get on here to be somewhat cheered up knowing that I might have some response to my question.
WRONG!
Maybe I'm doing this because my son just died, but I don't recall in any of the comments above my question being answered. Hmmmm, day made worse. Now I'm just a stupid evil person because I am trying to breed my Basset Hound (or at least you all think I am). Thank you Sampson's Mommies for at least thinking that my question wasn't so terrible. Was it!?!?
Well, if you must know I was breeding Puddles because when we bought her we of course had to show her off because I feel she is very beautiful. Well, in doing this we have since had 4 different people bugging us the past year and a half to breed our dog so that they can have one of the puppies. Well, because I was trying to be a responsible breeder and waiting until she was 2 I kept telling them no, not yet and that we weren't even sure that we were going to breed her. Well, now that she is 2 we decided to breed her after all I had researched quite a bit and even had her tested. Just because I had done so much research doesn't mean that the anser to my question was included in that research. By the way Rufus (everyone clap) did not figure it out, but after my son died we stopped trying (because I guess I knew I wouldn't be ready to breed my dog after his death) hmm, does that make me a responsible person. So, we have 5 homes for puppies (we are planning on keeping one). Yes, to dissapoint you even more we are planning on breeding her later on.
By the way since we are all giving our opinions. In my opinion my basset hound is a companion for my family, a family member (maybe you all feel this way too) but I don't think that just because a dog does not compete in shows or field trials doesn't mean that he or she is a bad dog/breed. Maybe we don't want our dog to do shows, that does not make her a bad quality dog.
Well, I guess I should stop now, but you all really made my day and I will remember not to come to you in the future with any help or news or anything like that. Don't worry the new commer is leaving the sight!
 

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Very sorry to hear about your loss which, no doubt, explains your over-reaction. :( Best wishes in your future endeavors.
 

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You've suffered immeasurably. I cannot begin to understand your loss.
But, know too, that all the advice offered here was sound and pragmatic. Noone ever made a personal, disparaging remark. It was very clinical. The only thing offered was something contrary to what you wanted to hear. Everyone here is passionate about bassets, and we have no doubt that you love yours as well. It was not apparent from the initial post that you had any experience or done any sort of research on breeding. This may explain the strong advice which was given. But, it was just that... Advice. Some of it from experts, who have forgotten more than I will ever know!
Again, I am so sorry about your son. Please take some time to address all your needs and pay no attention to the rest of the world for a while.
Be well.
 

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Puddles, So sorry. I know the pain you are suffering and the feelings of despair and it was never anyones intention to add to it.

In the coming weeks or months,if you ever need a faceless friend please P.M.me. I know from experience that it is sometimes easier to say things to a faceless stranger than it is to family and friends.

You will be in my thoughts.Take care.
 

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Welcome to the home of the ONLY RESPONSIBLEbasset breeders in the world !! Nobody else should be allowed to breed bassets!!!!
Seriously, not all are in this catagory, but some people seem to be more concerned with shaming newcomers instead of trying to educate. Many basset owners breed their dogs without knowing what can happen. By now you have an idea of the possibilities. If you still want to breed bassets, why not!! Some of these people need to remember that they started just like you.
 
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