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Hello! I am new to this site, so be patient with me...

We have 2 gorgeous bassets at home that we have bred, but my husband is in a panic about whether or not our female (Missie) is pregnant. Is there any sure way to tell very early after, as he likes to say, "the deed was done"?

I will take any information on anything about the whole subject you have and I thank you all greatly!

JoAnn

Missie & Sampson's "Mommy"
 

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From Current Techniques in Breeding Practices:
Early Pregancy Diagnosis

Detection of pregnancy can be accomplished through palpation of the enlarged uterus and fetal sacs, ultrasonography, or blood test. Manual palpation of the uterus can be performed accurately in cooperative bitches at 25-30 days of gestation. The uterus enlarges to accommodate the growing embryos, and each fluid filled embryonic sac can be felt as a chain of small round swellings. Beyond 30 days these individual sacs grow larger until they are in contact with the adjoining embryo and the individual sacs can no longer be detected. After 35 days, it is not recommended to palpate as it is possible to damage the fetus. If available, ultrasound examination has replaced palpation as the method of choice for early pregnancy detection. Ultrasound can detect embryonic sacs as early as 17-18 days, but is more accurate beginning about 20 days of gestation. A new laboratory test for canine pregnancy detects the hormone, Relaxin, which is only produced by pregnant bitches and is detectable with high accuracy after 25 days of gestation. The test is available with overnight results through most veterinary laboratories or as an in-house test with 10-minute results (Witness Relaxin, Synbiotics Corp.). Even the smallest litter can no longer go undetected.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the reply! It says it can be in house test for the Relaxin. Is this something I can get at the vets and do at home then? Do you know how much it might cost? Thanks!

JoAnn
 

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"In house" means at the vet's office, as opposed to being sent off to a lab. The cost will probably vary according to the vet and what part of the country you're in. Can't say for sure as I haven't used it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks again!

Okay, now another question... (Sorry)

When you palpitate the uterus, where should I be palpitating exactly? (Please, I hope you don't think that I am the idiot I sound like... It's been a LONG time since I last bred a dog and don't remember what I had learned...)

We are so excited about the possibility of puppies we can't stand it and just want to know. But we also live in a very rural area and the vet I called only suggested an xray at 6 weeks... I don't think that it is safe for the fetuses...

Thanks again for everyone's help!

JoAnn
 

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Since I never did get the hang of palpating, I can't help you there....

Six weeks seems a bit early for x-rays. When I did it, it was usually within the last two weeks. I don't anymore. I read that dogs who were x-rayed before birth had higher than normal incedence of cancer when they got older.

[ June 04, 2003, 08:19 PM: Message edited by: Soundtrack ]
 

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My vets won't even do palpating for clients. It's often unreliable.

Ultrasounds I believe cost around $200.

I saw somewhere where the Relaxin test kit costs the vet around $66 for a kit of 5. How much it will cost you I guess depends on your vets mark-up.

Breeding a litter can be expensive. Around here it costs over a $1000 for an emergency C-section.
 

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Perhaps you more experienced breeders, like Soundtrack, could offer her some links to some good sites to read up on for what to look for, signs of problems, etc? Kind of a "What to Expect When your Bitch is Expecting" thing?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ultrasounds are not offered (that I know of) in our area. Atleast that's what the local vets have told me... I'll keep looking though. Actually, I "feel" that she is expecting, but I have no patience and just wish I knew right now!

Any links any of you have would be great!

Thanks!

JoAnn
 

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Great idea Menzie! In addition to Soundtrack, Dean and Pinehawk there are 40 or more experienced breeders who are Cyberhound members. Maybe they would be willing to suggest books, websites and other references. I know if it were me I would want one book on breeding and whelping, recommended by my vet or an experienced basset breeder that either I know personally or comes recommended by my vet.

So a question to the breeders on the list: "What book on breeding and whelping would you recommend for someone that's inexperienced and whose bitch is expecting?" I'm sure your replies will be most helpful to JoAnn.
 

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My favourite book is "Successful Dog Breeding, The complete handbook of canine midwifery" by Chris Walcowicz and Bonnie Wilcox DVM.

Another good resource for breeders trying to "do it right" ie produce a line of quality dogs is the Yahoo group Dog Mentor. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogmentor/

But be warned, they will likely "sniff you over" pretty thoroughly. Many are blunt and will say exactly what they think, whether you want to hear it or not!

I'm actually at the "is she or isn't she?" stage as well. I bred two sisters at the same time and they are 3 1/2 weeks right now.(sigh)

[ June 05, 2003, 08:18 PM: Message edited by: Soundtrack ]
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You guys have been nothing but great to us! Thanks so much for all of your help! (Again!) We have been reading like mad and trying to learn everything we can. I wish that we lived in a metro area and would have more resources available... (Our small town doesn't even have a traffic light!) I'm hoping that once we can figure out if she's expecting we can relax a little until her due date which would be around July 24th. Then there will be the delivery which is sure to stress me out! I'm sure I will be visiting lots more often to this site here on out!

My hubby sends a HUGE THANKS, too!

JoAnn
 

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The joy of raising a litter of pups.The 63 day crash course of being prepared and learning all you need to know.
Shame on you for not educating yourself before you decide to breed.
 

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my feelings also Mike!!!!!! i don't use any books for any breeding.i just do what the Vet says and what i've learned from other people.i do have one thing that i have done that some other people may not think of... i buy from a breeding that i like or take a pup instead of stud fee,i'm to busy to be tied down at home with puppys right now. :)
 

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Once the deed is done, there is nothing to be gained by chastizing the owner. Now my priority is to try to help so that the puppies will have the best chance possible.
 

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Just wanted to add a few last minute thoughts. Bassets are experts at false pregnancies. They get fat, produce milk, and show all signs of being pregnant. Then decide "that's enough". lose the weight, dry up and return to normal.
Dogs have been having puppies for several thousand years and have managed without our help. Some people seem to feel that bassets would not survive if not for their assistance. Most litters arrive and live with no problems.
One thing I have learned, if mommy rejects one pup and pushes it away, it has a problem and will probably die no matter how hard you try to save it.
Good luck
 

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>>>Most litters arrive and live with no problems.
<<<

The operative word here is "most". I can immediately think of two puppies of mine that would have died had I not been there.

Spot was stillborn {not breathing} and we were able to revive him. He is now 10 years old and has never been sick a day in his life. He is a group winning champion, was one of the top three bassets in Canada, and has sired many champions including the Best of Winners at last years BHCA Nationals.

Cruiser was delivered with a hole where his umbilical cord would have been {not sure if this was the way he came or due to the mother pulling on the cord}. By the time I rushed him to the vet his intestines were starting to come out, they performed emercency surgery and he is now a very healthy 20 month old {who finished his championship as a puppy}.

It also takes very little time to lose a puppy due to the mother sitting on it. That's why my girls and their pups are with me 24/7 from a week before due date until the pups are at least 2 weeks old.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well, first of all, I may be an "idiot" for not having educated myself before the deed was done, but I have bred dogs before, just not this breed. I have bred Siberian Huskies and it was great and all went smoothly. I just had questions about this because it was a different breed. I know that Bassets need a lot of attention (atleast my 2 do) and I want to make sure she has everything she needs. I thought this looked like the place to get my answers, and I'm glad I posted. Again thank you so much for all of your help! I really hope that if I need anything else you all will be able to help me. I am gaining much information. Hope you all have a great weekend!

JoAnn

P.S. I can't remember who posted about having mom with you 24/7 soon before birth and 2 weeks after, but that was my plan. My hubby will be off from work for the summer, so he can play Mr. Mom! ;)
 
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