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Discussion Starter #1
'Just bought puppy and now having hip issues. Poor little girl having much trouble walking - weakness in hind legs / hip area. 'Vet checking into it - just happened over weekend. 'Found out another puppy from same litter having similar issues. I trust the vet and am willing to give her some time to look into problem - just wanting to hear from others who have bassets for experiences. Vet is thinking displaysia is culprit. I would like to hear if others have had same experience / what treatments worked / how to deal with it / or if sounds like something else. Thanks so much for your input in advance. We love the little girl and want the best.
 

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Have you contacted the breeder about this? Dysplasia is inherited --- I'd always thought it was rare in bassets, so this is disturbing.

In any case, you need to contact the breeder and tell them. Given they were willing to sell a puppy at 7 weeks, it's unlikely they'll care.

As for what to do, continue talking to your vet. I have an ancient German Shepherd girl with dysplasia and, has I had her when she was a pup, knowing what I do now, I would have definitely opted for surgery. It's a rough thing for the older dogs to deal with --- limits their mobility significantly, making it hard to play, go up and down stairs, etc.

Edited to add: And maybe most important, it's very painful for the dogs. So if it does turn out to be dysplasia, definitely consider finding an orthopedic vet and look into options for nipping it in the bud, including surgery.
 

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Poor little girl having much trouble walking - weakness in hind legs / hip area.[/b]
Sorry to hear your new pet is having problems. :( It would be unusual for a basset to show signs/symptoms of hip dysplasia at this early age. Would also worry about a neurologic issue. Please keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Have you contacted the breeder about this? Dysplasia is inherited --- I'd always thought it was rare in bassets, so this is disturbing.

In any case, you need to contact the breeder and tell them. Given they were willing to sell a puppy at 7 weeks, it's unlikely they'll care.

As for what to do, continue talking to your vet. I have an ancient German Shepherd girl with dysplasia and, has I had her when she was a pup, knowing what I do now, I would have definitely opted for surgery. It's a rough thing for the older dogs to deal with --- limits their mobility significantly, making it hard to play, go up and down stairs, etc.

Edited to add: And maybe most important, it's very painful for the dogs. So if it does turn out to be dysplasia, definitely consider finding an orthopedic vet and look into options for nipping it in the bud, including surgery.[/b]

What surgery options are available? What age is it recommended?

As for breeder - local respected family that just had pups (they are akc) - I don't feel they have done anything wrong and feel no ill toward them - just want to help my pup.
 

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I would listen to Betsy on this. She knows much more than me about doggie disorders. Besides, I did a little reading, and dysplasia doesn't cause problems in a pup this young.
 

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Vet has called tonight. After conferring with University - now think its HOD. Anyone else see this before? We are taking wait and see approach as it can be self limiting and may resolve - doesn't seem to be in pain and still eating ok
 

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Discussion Starter #7
new puppy now diagnosed with possible HOD - wondering if anyone else go through this - trying to be positive while we wait and see ... puppy seems to be ok other than walking - very weak in hind quarters
 

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I'm aware of only one basset that was believed to have HOD. What you're describing doesn't sound like typical HOD, which is painful and usually affects forelimbs more severely than rear. Does she have characteristic changes on x-ray?


HOD links:

Hypertrophic Osterodystrophy, Fred Lanting

HOD is an orthopedic disease seen in medium, large, and giant breeds, more common in some than others. There may be several causative factors including heredity, infection, and possibly vaccines, with contributing factors being both genetic susceptibility (“weakness”) and calcium supplementation or unlimited/excessive feeding of pups resulting in mineral overloading as an intensifier of pain and abnormal bone growth.

As in the case of panosteitis, the disease appears to be both self-limited and transient, independent of treatment. Although there are rare deaths, probably due to “complications”, most pups outgrow HOD within one to a few months. The fatality rate is too erratic to reliably measure. In some reports it has been 25-35% (almost certainly inflated via poor statistics and diagnoses) and in others it was less than 4%. In every case, it is traumatic because of the pup's pain and the owner's helplessness and frustration.

Multiple relapses are not uncommon, and the same bones can be affected more than once. Extraperiosteal calcification is slowly resorbed and radiodensity of the affected limbs returns to normal or nearly so. Some individuals are left with permanently bowed forelegs because the ulna has grown at a different rate than the radius (as is the case in some elbow dysplasias), and some are cowhocked for life. Most, however, endure and survive the effects of HOD without permanent damage.[/b]
Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy, Dr. Daniel Degner, DACVS
Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy, Merck Veterinary Manual
HOD Links, Bernese Mountain Dog Health Links (scroll down)
 

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Wow, I have never heard of this, although I am no Basset expert. I just wanted to say sorry you are going through this. My newest dog Gibbs (who I adopted from a shelter) came to me with some leg problems is a joyful boy and I would do anything it takes to make him feel better so I know how you feel. Keep us posted.

~Heather
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm aware of only one basset that was believed to have HOD. What you're describing doesn't sound like typical HOD, which is painful and usually affects forelimbs more severely than rear. Does she have characteristic changes on x-ray?
HOD links:

Hypertrophic Osterodystrophy, Fred Lanting
Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy, Dr. Daniel Degner, DACVS
Hypertrophic Osteodystrophy, Merck Veterinary Manual
HOD Links, Bernese Mountain Dog Health Links (scroll down)[/b]

Our vet has contacted a trusted university in our area. This is a suggestion they have made - HOD. Pano usually occurs in older dogs - not usually one this young. At this point we have not done x-rays. Either way we would be having to wait and see as there is not a lot they can do right now if it is Pano or HOD. I also read Lanting's report on HOD and thought it sounded very similar to what we are seeing. This occured right after vaccinations and this corresponds with Lanting's information. There is another puppy from the same litter having similar issues so genetics does seem to play a role here. She has had the diarreha also mentioned. At this point they really don't know for sure.

I really don't feel it is Parvo. When they get sick with Parvo they don't have any energy. When they start to decline they continue to go down hill. Our dog does have some energy and not so much lethargic. She does tire very easily as she tries to walk around.

Today it seems to be worse as her front legs are also seeming weak. She is eating and drinking still - just very weak and unable to walk very far and unable to handle wood floors, slick surfaces, etc.

This really is frustrating. We just want to fix it, but don't know how at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Wow, I have never heard of this, although I am no Basset expert. I just wanted to say sorry you are going through this. My newest dog Gibbs (who I adopted from a shelter) came to me with some leg problems is a joyful boy and I would do anything it takes to make him feel better so I know how you feel. Keep us posted.

~Heather[/b]
Thanks for your concern. We lost our last basset to bloat in January at one year old. We just purchased these two puppies from a local respected family who allowed their two akc bassets to have puppies. I never dreamed we would have health issues again. This family uses the same vet we use so they have a good history of taking care of their pets.

I too would like to do anything it takes, but I have found out that it costs thousands of dollars if we end up having to replace our puppy's hip. It is not realistic of me to afford that. I am hopin we will not get to that point.

Before we purchased these two we were thinking about checking into adopting from a shelter. We would have to have gone out of state. When these puppies were found 15 minutes away, we were thrilled. I just felt I needed some babies to love.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Our vet has contacted a trusted university in our area. This is a suggestion they have made - HOD. Pano usually occurs in older dogs - not usually one this young. At this point we have not done x-rays. Either way we would be having to wait and see as there is not a lot they can do right now if it is Pano or HOD. I also read Lanting's report on HOD and thought it sounded very similar to what we are seeing. This occured right after vaccinations and this corresponds with Lanting's information. There is another puppy from the same litter having similar issues so genetics does seem to play a role here. She has had the diarreha also mentioned. At this point they really don't know for sure.

I really don't feel it is Parvo. When they get sick with Parvo they don't have any energy. When they start to decline they continue to go down hill. Our dog does have some energy and not so much lethargic. She does tire very easily as she tries to walk around.

Today it seems to be worse as her front legs are also seeming weak. She is eating and drinking still - just very weak and unable to walk very far and unable to handle wood floors, slick surfaces, etc.

This really is frustrating. We just want to fix it, but don't know how at this point.[/b]
Breed Occurence
Hypertrophic osteodystrophy affects young, rapidly growing dogs and the following breeds have been reported to be affected :

Bassett Hound, Borzoi, Boxer, Collie, Dalmatian, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, German Shorthaired Pointer, Great Dane, Greyhound, Irish Setter, Irish Wolfhound, Labrador Retriever, St Bernard and Weimaraner

Age
Most animals are affected between 2-8 months of age.

http://www.provet.co.uk/health/diseases/ortho-HOD.htm
 

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Hope this poor puppy gets a diagnosis and some sort of relief sooner rather than later. :(
 

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Hope this poor puppy gets a diagnosis and some sort of relief sooner rather than later. :([/b]
What would you suggest at this point? Relief would be good right now. We are already seeing the best vet in our area. I have seen her work with animals others have given up on. I know she has a really good heart and knows small animals. It helps to know she is not just brushing us off and working with us.
 

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Without appropriate diagnostic studies, like x-rays and lab tests, your vet is handicapped in terms of making or ruling out diagnoses and suggesting appropriate therapy. :( How's the poor pup doing this morning?
 

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Can your vet request that the vet school she consulted actually see your pup? We are fortunate to live near the University of Pennsylvania and they are great in dealing with puzzling cases- not sure from your posts where you are located-
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Without appropriate diagnostic studies, like x-rays and lab tests, your vet is handicapped in terms of making or ruling out diagnoses and suggesting appropriate therapy. :( How's the poor pup doing this morning?[/b]
She is lively in nature and eating and drinking. She seems to get around a little better as to front legs. Yesterday was probably the worst as far as mobility.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Can your vet request that the vet school she consulted actually see your pup? We are fortunate to live near the University of Pennsylvania and they are great in dealing with puzzling cases- not sure from your posts where you are located-[/b]
I think the vet would probably not send us to the university until tests had been run locally. Maybe we can see about what tests can be done here. I think tests may not have been suggested yet since the diseases suggested don't really have a treatment - just wait and see anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Have you contacted the breeder about this? Dysplasia is inherited --- I'd always thought it was rare in bassets, so this is disturbing.

In any case, you need to contact the breeder and tell them. Given they were willing to sell a puppy at 7 weeks, it's unlikely they'll care.

As for what to do, continue talking to your vet. I have an ancient German Shepherd girl with dysplasia and, has I had her when she was a pup, knowing what I do now, I would have definitely opted for surgery. It's a rough thing for the older dogs to deal with --- limits their mobility significantly, making it hard to play, go up and down stairs, etc.

Edited to add: And maybe most important, it's very painful for the dogs. So if it does turn out to be dysplasia, definitely consider finding an orthopedic vet and look into options for nipping it in the bud, including surgery.[/b]
Is it not common in your area to sell puppies at this age? I see it all the time and think nothing of it - as long as the puppy is eating and drinking on its own.
 

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Well, only backyard breeders or puppymills would sell puppies younger than 8 weeks, while many (most?) reputable breeders keep them longer - 12 weeks, I think?

They need to be with their mom and littermates for at least 8 weeks, in order to become properly socialized. Plus, their health suffers - they're just babies.

But here in the eastern Oklahoma area - well, actually, Oklahoma period - and Missouri - bassets have become extremely popular in the last maybe five years. A really nasty basset puppymill got busted here just a few months ago.

And I know the shelters and rescues here have had tons of bassets. The worst was the spell of time when I was seeing dumped bassets out in the country. :( Over a year or two, I saw 10? 20? bassets who'd been dumped. It was so sad.

But that's what happens when there's a horrible pet overpopulation problem and people just keep breeding them, to make a little money. :(
 
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