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I've been training my Basset for six months and he's still peeing in the house!! I've successfully trained many dogs to pee on command but this guy isn't getting it. He's a year old (I got him at 6 months) and he's just as bad as he was in the beginning. I've used crate training before and it's always, always worked. I also use major praise when he goes outside. I can't figure this out! Why is this taking soooo long??
 

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We had the exact same problem with one of our dogs, Daisy. We have adopted several dogs throughout the years, in addition to fostering for a basset rescue - never had any trouble pottie training any of them with the traditional monitoring of food/water intake, rewards for eliminating outside, crate training as a last resort, etc. We adopted Daisy from a rescue at about 4 weeks old, and knew better than to expect she would catch on to pottie training any sooner that six months. Well, at a year old she was still soiling the floor (arghhh!!). It wasn't until we adopted her first sibling, Bo, (as she had previously been an only-child to that point so we could devote our time toward raising her), that she finally shaped up. The first time Daisy squatted in the living room floor, Bo looked at her, looked at us, looked back at what Daisy was doing on the living room floor, then put his tail between his legs and slinked over to the far corner of the room, as if to say, "I'm not getting blamed for that!" It was really weird, but after a few days Daisy quit completely quit going in the house. I wish I could ask her what the sudden change of heart was! I can't help but think it had something to do with her seeing Bo's reaction...

I know that doesn't help you out much, but I think what I learned from my experience with Daisy is that sometimes bassets just do things when theyr'e darn good and ready, and not a moment sooner!
 

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Thanks for your reply. I've been totally successful training other breeds to pee on command (people are always amazed at this-neighbors have noticed that I'm not outside very long for the last potty trip of the night!) so I have confidence in my ability to train....it's just that precious little Watson is a bit of a doofus. I know that Basset owners like to say they're stubborn but at least with my Basset, it's not stubbornness as much as it is complete airheadedness. For example, my husband caught Watson peeing in the house and scolded him, putting him immediately in the backyard. In other scenarios, a loud NO! has been sufficient coupled with a trip out the back door. But noooo, not so here. Not 30 minutes later Watson peed again and this time RIGHT NEXT TO MY ADULT SON!!! He didn't learn a darn thing.......And since I already have two big dogs (over 100 pounds each) getting another Basset to "teach" Watson isn't an option.
 

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Any idea what his living circumstances were before you got him? For instance, was he in a kennel or a home? Bassets can be difficult to housetrain, but this sounds like there is something else going on. That being said, Lightning was about a year old before he "got it." I never did trust Stomps with the run of the house, but he was a rescue with issues.
 

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I know that Basset owners like to say they're stubborn but at least with my Basset, it's not stubbornness as much as it is complete airheadedness.
Is this your first basset? If so, welcome to bassettude!

Rosco picked up on crate training pretty quickly, but he had the ocassional accident up to about 11 months of age. Layla was an adoptee and she had several accidents within the first month we brought her home. None for her for a few weeks now, but I wouldn't be surprised if it happens again. I still crate them both (1 year 2 months and 1 year 9 months) when I leave the house just to be safe.

Of course there could also be health issues like urinary tract infections that might contribute. If my own experience is any help it's all about patience, patience, patience, but it sounds like you are pretty experienced with that when it comes to training dogs.

Good luck!
 

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You will never be successfully until you can eliminate accidents. I have never met a basset that learns well through punishment so reprimands etc general do not work well with them. It is apparent than this dog has developed or came with a substrate preference for carpeting or whatever else you have for flooring in the house. You need to be exceedingly diligent and treat the dog as if it were a very young puppy. prevent accident by taking him out often and on schedule, a rigid schedule for food, water. play/exercise and sleep. Confinement when he is not strictly supervised. Because in additional to having to train the dog where to go you are having to first over come a preference for going where he should that he came with.

FWIW my last floor basset were trained to relieve themselves on command quite successfully. What are you suing to reward the dog for going when and were you want? How high is it on his desirability ranking. Contrary to many breeds basset to not can any real pleasure from please humans. It is all about them. Food for most bassets is an effective way to change attitudes.

House training Your Puppy is my favorite house training article.

There are a couple of things that can also dramatical effect housetrain a basset that maybe occurring or at least have an influence. Many bassets do not like to get wet, either from rain or dew and will actively avoid wet grass, ground or going outside in the rain. You need to counter condition and desensitize the dog to these conditions with extra special reward so the eventual are actual looking forward to them. and be extra diligent when they occur because it means an accident is more likely.

Keep in mind this water phobia certainly does not effect all of them and not even most but a significant portion that it noticeable in the breed as having a predilection for it.
 

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I'm glad to hear from other owners that it took about a year to pottie-train their basset puppies! Daisy has been our first and only puppy we've raised so far - the rest have been adopted from shelters or rescues, ranging in age from 1 or more years old - most of them were either already pottie-trained or caught on quickly. I was worried Daisy was, um, slow - my husband was worried we had a delinquent on our hands!
 

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I have never seen a basset puppy house trained before six months a year or more is typical they a natorious slow to house train, if the come with some issues like having accidents for thefirst siz months its going to be a lot longer. House train is more than just not having accidents. One of the hardest thing can be to train a basset to let you know it need to go out rather than sneeking off and find his own secret spot It is general better to train a "go out Signal' rather than leave it to change like ringing a bell

House Training: Ring My Bell!


If you have a problem with the dog not doing anything when you take him out the folloing hint can help
Potty training tip
 

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I would never say that bassets are slow or airheaded. They are very intelligent dogs. You just have to realize that they are a unique breed and what worked well for your other breeds may not work with your basset. As another poster put it perfectly, they have bassetude. Please don't think of your puppy as slow or airheaded.:(
 

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Of course there could also be health issues like urinary tract infections that might contribute.
Exactly what I was thinking. It can't hurt to at least have a UTI ruled out, just in case. Our puppy (now 5 months old) had one and it was absolutely impossible (not to mention extremely frustrating) to even attempt to housetrain her because she just could not hold it in. Once the infection cleared up, the accidents have reduced drastically, and in fact she now gets that she should paw at the door to go out.

Scully, our girl at the bridge, was a nightmare to housetrain. It took a very long time for her to get it. It wasn't until she was at least 9 months old that she realized peeing in the house was not winning her any brownie points!
 

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Our girl Josie poops like 6 times a day. She's almost 6 months old. I get up 2-3 times in the middle of the night to let her out and she poops and pees each time I let her out.

But then yesterday, she held it all day without pooping.
 

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I have never seen a basset puppy house trained before six months a year or more is typical

Mikey, just to let you know.. Our previous basset was totally house trained in less than a week at 12 weeks old, virtually never had an accident her whole life. Best and easiest dog to house train I ever had of any breed.

Of course I knew when we got these two, there was no way I would be that lucky again. :(
 

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Josie's a full fledge disaster. She poops and pees on the floor multiple times per day. My Faince and I have tried everything. Josie just doesn't get it. The other day, I took her for a long (40 minute) walk in the morning. She proceeded to crap on the floor right when we got inside.

When we crate her, she pees and poops all over herself.
 

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Willow, who's 15 weeks old, still has the occasional tinkle related accident, but overall getting her to catch onto the concept of going outside wasn't terrible. That said, getting her to pee on potty-pads or on command has been impossible. As everyone else has said food is the key and it needs to be something really-really good. We use bits of cheese and chopped chicken.

I think my puppy is stubborn, super-stubborn with her potties. Bassetude (nice phrase) describes it ideally. I love her to death but oh. my. god. even on her best behavior she is a brat -- an adorable brat, but a brat.

With pottying, she will go when she wants and I could stand next to her saying "go potty" until I dozed off and she'd wait me out. She's also stubborn about where she goes number ones and number twos, they have to be in different areas under all circumstances, and she'll have no exceptions to this. Also once she decided going poop outside was better than inside then getting her to have it any other was is a non-option. I actually needed to have her poop inside this week, she just held it and didn't go until she was allowed to go outside again.

As far as air-headedness goes, she's definitely aloof but in the way of intelligence I've found my pup to be just the opposite. If anything, I'd say a lot of times I'm shocked by just how intelligent she is. Having other breeds of dogs in the past I expect a dog to act a certain way. Willow (and I imagine basset hounds in general) is pretty unique, anything she does she actually contemplates and just me saying it or telling her I enjoy that she does it isn't good enough. She wants to do what she wants to do when she wants to do it and someone better offer her something pretty amazing for her to do anything else. Finding out what is amazing to her is the trick. The thing is, if it's not in her head that whatever she is doing is her idea, she's not interested. OHHH yeah...that's the best way I've found to train her to do anything...have to trick her into thinking it's HER idea and the best idea she's ever had ever...once she believes that, she's commited to it and everything else is easy going.

As far as stubborn though, using potty training as an example, she knows that pottying on the pad gets her a good snack. So...if she wants a good snack she'll sit by the door and whine a bit, I get up and let her out. She'll go out, walk to the pad, feign going potty and then give me an expecting "okay, I sat at the door, I walked out, I even stood on that gross thing you want me to stand on, and I did the potty-squat, where's my treat?" If I take her out and she's not ready, she also has a way of making her 15 lb frame turn into a 50 lb one. I'll walk her around and she'll just sit down on her rump in a "make me" fashion. If I try to pick her up she feels like she weighs a ton (I think she must be putting every ounce of herself into keeping that bottom of the ground). If I give her a little pull she'll lay flat on her stomach like a beached whale (my boyfriend and I have started calling it "our new basset-hound rug" because of how flat she'll lay down) and let me drag her by the harness before she'll move an inch. (9.9) Oh that puppy of mine...loveable, adorable, friendly, abnormally clingy and yet full of spunk.
 

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Too much freedom to make mistakes

If your dog has freedom in the house, he can reinforce his peeing in your home. Your doing a lot right. Keep him on a short leash, tied to a piece of furniture while at the same time in your line of sight. If the crate works,
this will work as it uses the same concept. After he has not gone in the house
for 2 weeks straight, and you have removed any scent markers he has left
you can let him off.

Ron Berman - Dog Expert, Bite Expert, D.A.B.F.E., Expert Witness and Consultant for Litigation
 

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Our girl Josie poops like 6 times a day. She's almost 6 months old
This is an awful lot of pooping. How much are you feeding her and how often?.

Puppies have a shorter digestive track than dogs overfeed often results in not an overwieght dog but rather more undigested food passing through the digestive tract quickly i.e. a lot more poop.

Secondly There is a normal digeestive reflex that when food enters the stomach that signals the bowels to empty. You can take advantage of this reflex by matching the number of time the dogs poops to her feeding schedule. Make this schedule very ridgid and fix, dogs have an incrediable percise internal clock make use of it. Feed the dog as manytimes during the day that it poops. So dog eats, digestive reflex takes place, dog out to poop. Putting Deffecation on a schedule makes it much easier to manage. For most this occurs natural but unfortunately not all but it is why for most people find eliminating defication accidents is easier than urination ones because they are more predictable.

see the following thread in another forum for extensive link to the process and concepts outlined above. The Poopie Dilemma...
 
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