Basset Hounds Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

yawn!


ken is the front one!

Hi Everyone!

Ken is almost 2 years old. His sister is Avery, a beagle (in the pic above) and his brother is Mcdougal, a mini schnauzer.

I get bored at work so I go on dog forums all day. Lately Ken has been acting aggressively. We go camping almost every weekend and when our friends stop by our campsite he growls at them. He's even nipped at a few when they get too close! if you come at him too quickly, he draws back as if you're going to hit him. I don't get it. We got him as an 8 week old puppy and he's never been around anyone who would've hit him. He is neutered and has no hypothyroidism symptoms. I thought he was a well-adjusted dog (no reason for him to be fearful/shy, he comes everywhere with us and has been exposed to a lot of different situations from the time we got him) but this growling/barking at random people SUCKS!

Another thing, he doesn't do this at home (or somewhere where he can run free), only when on a leash (like when we're camping or at someone's house)

???? we've been bringing him camping the past 2 seasons and he just started this crap this year. Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
Another thing, he doesn't do this at home (or somewhere where he can run free), only when on a leash (like when we're camping or at someone's house)

???? we've been bringing him camping the past 2 seasons and he just started this crap this year. Any ideas?[/b]
see the following links to explain all

ON-LEASH AGGRESSION
Dogs are highly social, to the point of compulsion. When most dogs spot another dog on the street, they are highly motivated to approach and investigate. Being on leash restricts their ability to do so. The resulting frustration translates into increased excitement and agitation, which can be alarming to the owner, who may then deliberately restrict access, tense up before encounters or even punish the dog. This starts an association between the sight of dogs and frustration as well as owner tension and possibly punishment. A vicious cycle is then born that often culminates in thwarting-related or "barrier frustration" aggression. This, combined with owner-proximity induced resource guarding, is why so many dogs are more aggressive on leash than off.[/b]

<a href="http://www.flyingdogpress.com/casehis.html" target="_blank">AGGRESSION: A Case History with Harry T.
</a>
"This case history is taken from an actual case; "Harry T." is not his real name - it seemed kinder to keep the names of the real people & dog out of the story. "Harry" agreed that this is a pretty accurate interpretation of his tale. '

HANDLING ON-LEAD AGGRESSION -
"A common behavior problems, on-lead aggression involves the handler & unintentional training. Here's how to resolve the problem without using aggression of your own'

ON-LEASH AGGRESSION
By far, one of the most common behavior problems that dog trainers are asked to address is leash-reactivity. The normally calm, enjoyable dog that turns into a quivering, snarling, white-hot ball of canine terror at the mere sight of another dog on a walk. Owners of these dogs become members of the Midnight Walking Club, changing their walking schedules to avoid other dogs.

This behavior appears in dogs purebred and mixed who were acquired as puppies from breeders and adopted from rescues. Leash-reactive behavior does not discriminate by breed or background.

In spite of all the lunging, snarling, growling and barking, some of these dogs are actually quite friendly to other dogs when off-leash. yet, when they are on-leash and on a walk, they become the canine equivalent of Mr. Hyde. This is why the behavior is more accurately referred to as leash-reactivity; the dog is reacting to something in the environment. Simply being attached to a leash does not not incite aggressive behavior.[/b]
On-Leash Aggression: How to Stop It
You’re right, of course. Your dog isn’t aggressive; he’s frustrated. He’s actually throwing a canine tantrum. Like a child trying to get candy in a grocery store, your dog is being prevented from getting what he wants[/b]
ARTICLES: LEASH AGGRESSION

THE PROBLEM WITH RETRACTABLE LEASHES


FEISTY FIDO: HELP FOR THE LEASH AGGRESSIVE DOG
If you have a dog who is barking and lunging at other dogs while on leash, you are not alone. It's a very common behavior problem, even if the same dog gets along well with others OFF leash. It is also a problem with a high rate of successful treatment. What you can get from this booklet is the ability to leash-walk your dog around others, whether it's down the sidewalk or at the vet clinic, knowing that your dog will walk politely by another dog, rather than causing a scene. Methods are totally positive reinforcement[/b]
n
While most of the links deal with dog on dog leash aggression keep in mind it is likely Ken intially wated to be more with people than dogs so the leash aggression developed out of barrier fustration at not being able to reach them.


One often over-looked aspected of the problem is the roll a lack of self control in the dog played. A dog with self control does not exhibit barrier fustration because it is not at the end of the leash in the first place but rather sitting quitely waiting on the human as they approach. While teach self control won't fix the current problem it will prevent it from reoccur once you fix it.

TEACHING SELF CONTROL

Any Dog Can Live Calmly in a House - Even Yours!

Lowering Arousal: How to Train Impulse Control

Protocol for Relaxation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Mikey, we took Ken out this weekend and he only growled once and didn't snap at anyone. I was surprised because he was around quite a few people (even some kids, i always get nervous when he's around kids but he mostly just ignores them) and dogs and he was behaving very nicely.

Even when our camping neighbor came over he didn't bother with her, usually he always growls at her, but this time he just sniffed her shoes and walked away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
Thanks Mikey, we took Ken out this weekend and he only growled once and didn't snap at anyone. I was surprised because he was around quite a few people (even some kids, i always get nervous when he's around kids but he mostly just ignores them) and dogs and he was behaving very nicely.

Even when our camping neighbor came over he didn't bother with her, usually he always growls at her, but this time he just sniffed her shoes and walked away.[/b]

Keep in mind yuor nerviousness will be obvious to the dog as well and create nerviousness in him as well. That is why desensitizing and couunter-condition exercise in the references are inportant not just for the dog but you as well. As the dog becomes less reactive you will become less nervious wich in turn lower the arousal level in the dog so he won't be as reactive. Just as the problem develops like a snow man from a snow ball slow build on each encounter the solution works the same way. The solution is neither fast nor easy. it took time for the behavior to develope to where it is know it will take time to get it to where you want it to be.

Do not forget to reward all those non reactive encounter. It is one of the most overlooked asspect of training. Frogeting to reward the behavior we want. And then wonder why the dog forgets to do them .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Keep in mind yuor nerviousness will be obvious to the dog as well and create nerviousness in him as well. That is why desensitizing and couunter-condition exercise in the references are inportant not just for the dog but you as well. As the dog becomes less reactive you will become less nervious wich in turn lower the arousal level in the dog so he won't be as reactive. Just as the problem develops like a snow man from a snow ball slow build on each encounter the solution works the same way. The solution is neither fast nor easy. it took time for the behavior to develope to where it is know it will take time to get it to where you want it to be.

Do not forget to reward all those non reactive encounter. It is one of the most overlooked asspect of training. Frogeting to reward the behavior we want. And then wonder why the dog forgets to do them .[/b]
it was weird because I wasn't nervous about him nipping the first time he did it.

Every time he's been good around people he gets tons of praise and belly rubs.

I'm still at a loss as to why he started doing it in the first place, it was just out of the blue one day when we were camping.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top