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I don't know if anyone remembers me I haven't been around for a while, my daughter was having a baby with a complicated heart condition, well the god news is I have a beautiful grandaughter who so far has had 2 open heart surgeries with at least 2 more to come.I was worried Menna would be a problem with the baby but she just seems to be fasinated with her and I really don't think she would hurt her but of course I wouldn't leave them alone together.
My problem at the moment is that Menna has taken to growling at my husband at odd times and if I am in the kitchen cooking or plateing food she often growls at my husband and son-in-law.
I know things have changed for her because my daughter, son-in-law, the baby and their dog (who Menna loves as long as she doesn't want her food) stay with us for 4 days most weeks for support with the baby and also Callie my chow passed away but that didn't seem to upset her she hasn't seemed to miss her at all.
Can anyone suggest why she is growling and a way to stop it.
 

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Wow! You've certainly been through an awful lot. Glad to hear your granddaughter is doing well. Poor little mite.

As to the growling -- Menna has been through everything you have, so I've no doubt she's been in a turmoil. Dogs just deal with things differently. It's not good to have this going on, and I'm no expert, but perhaps your husband should take over feeding for awhile. Before he puts Menna's food on the floor, he should have her sit and wait. This 'passive aggressive' routine will establish him as being in charge, and hopefully Menna will stop trying to push him around.

I'm sure others will be along soon.......
 

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HI
Others might not agree with me but when our Charlie (GA) started growling at my husband my husband took charge and told Charlie that he My husband was the alpha male in this house and that was the way it was staying. He didn't hurt Charlie but he did raise his voice and towered over him. My husband was in the military so he can be very loud and strict. He had to do this twice in the 11 years Charlie lived. And he was my husbands dog Charlie loved him but he knew he was boss. I never managed to do this so I never put myself in positions to make Charlie growl at me. If he picked up something he wasn't suppose to I would trade bisquits, but my husband just had to say Drop It.
So your husband may have to assert himself if other suggestions don't work. My daughter and son also were able to stand up to Charlie. I was just to soft and most of the time I could do anything to him cut his nails clean his ears, but getting contraband out of is mouth I couldn't do without bribes.
Otherwise Charlie never growled. We always figured if someone broke in the house he would help them carry stuff out.

stephanie
 

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Keep in mind growling is a form of comunication for the dogs and many time an appropriate one, The only time you need to worry about it is when it is inappropriate.

Hmmm a dog growing in the presence of food. This it what is referred to as resource guarding a quick search of this site will pull up many thread on this subject, Jean Donaldson book Mine! "a quide to resource guarding' is a definitive referrence in dealing with this normal dog bwehavior, If can be found on amazon, dogwise and other book outlets.

Something else to thing about. If the dog can't/ doesn't beheave appropriately in a particular setting why is he allowed in it.

In order for a dog to be allowed on the furniture he should first get off it when requested to do so.

In order for a dog to be allowed in a human bed it should tollerate being touched while it sleeps

In order to be allowed in the Kitchen when food is being prepaired it should not be guarding the food.

Even if you have an open floor plan that can not be physical barricaded to prevent the dog from moving in the kitchen there are other ways to acoplish the same thing.

retrain the dog with a crate, leash etc to prevent access or better yet teach the dog a more appropriate location to be. see " Just give him a spot to stay on, then toss treats constantly. Reward heavily at first, and you can gradually reduce the number of treats later.

I keep a tub of "stinkified cheerios" (in a container with stinky treats so they absorb the smell) on my kitchen counter. Brady has a spot across the room on the rug she *must* go to to get treats tossed while I cook. Dogs who walk around the kitchen and sniff underfoot get nada. Dogs on the rug get all kinds of goodies. She figured it out pretty quick all on her own. Sometimes she even gets a taste of what I'm cooking, which makes it really worthwhile! I never bothered putting it on cue - she just sees me step up to the counter and she absolutely *hustles* to her spot. Recently she added a "head down" on her own, so she's not just lying down, she's flattened to the ground! It's cute, and it gets rewarded, so she does it. So you can definitely expect Monty to automatically start going to his spot the second he sees you sit down at the table to eat, if you reward it consistently and make it worth" his while!


Personnally I would avoid any technique bassed on intimidation, physical or not. This is not because it does not wok because it has and dose work for many dog as proven through out history but becasue of the consequences of when it does not. Let us look at from the dogs point of view,

When encounter a threat, it need not be phisical contact the dog has basically to responce fight or flight. If the dog choses flight all is well it backs down and is rewarded because no harm came of it,.

If on the other hand the dog instead choses to fight what happen
1. it startles the human which cause them to back away, which reinforced the dog to fight back

2. The human fights back even stronger and metophorically or specifically subdues the dog. it is a rare dog indeed that learns there is no way to beet human I must give up rather what it learns is it was not aggressive enough from the outset, it need to start off even more aggressive.

if however you train with a more possitve approach rewarding the dog for appropriate behavior you end up with the same results with out the risks. The diffuculty is rewarding the appropriate behavior

We went the dog to do sit quitely to ask for attention but generial that is ignored, However bark, whine scratch the back of a human legs wow that gets attiontion immeadeately.. No one, even the best trainer are not immune for neglecting to reward appropriate behavior often enough,
 
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