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Hi im new to this site and i have 10 month old basset that is in tip top shape, really good lookin dog and i was just wondering if bassets have been used for grouse and pheasant and if they are good dogs for that type of hunting.
 

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answer to the frist part is yes the answer to the second is more complicated and comes down to what is important to you in a bird dog. They track and flush bird and do so at a speed and closeness that you can shoot over them. They do not point, and it is a rare basset indeed that will retreive. In fact you may find yourself in a race to get to the bird befor the dogs so there will be anything less but alot of that is training.

see Hunting Bassets

and
Question for the hunters.....
 

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YEah I'd say they would definately flush it out but that would probably be the extent of their help in hunting them. Ours at least don't retrieve anything.
 

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They run free, but stayed so close that all birds were in range ---- The only problem was that Marty's hounds like pheasant -- you better get to the bird quick, cause while you're running, they're plucking
 

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Discussion Starter #8
They run free, but stayed so close that all birds were in range ---- The only problem was that Marty's hounds like pheasant -- you better get to the bird quick, cause while you're running, they're plucking
Have you ever used those belt leashes? i think thats what im interested in because my hound isn't very obedient, and i think i would have a hard time chasing him with the bird in his mouth.
 

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They run free, but stayed so close that all birds were in range ---- The only problem was that Marty's hounds like pheasant -- you better get to the bird quick, cause while you're running, they're plucking
Too funny I can see that now. That is very impressive though. So they retreive it and everything hey? Or do they just go to the spot where the bird is and start plucking feathers? LOL
 

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I learned the other day never to let Lightning get to the bird before me. In this case it was a live baby bird that I was trying to catch. But as if without even knowing what he was doing, Lightning scooped it up and took off with it. Even as he ran from me turned he looked back as if to say "I don't know what's possessed me, but I can't let you have this back." Then I heard a big crunch and knew the chase was over. Lightning spent the next 20 minutes hiding and rehiding the bird in various holes in the back yard. He's never once shown any interest in birds, squirrels, or rabbits, so this was very surprising, for both of us.
 

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for those who think bassets are slow, I have a $20 dollar bill for anybody who can bring any of my bassets back to me after they have started running a rabbit. You have 5 minutes to claim the money !!!!
Shock collars are very effective long distance training devices
 

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There is a big difference between trying to catch a dog than keeping them from a spot. You need not even need to be as fast but by positioning, comanding and taking of space you can force the dog to run a much longer path. Putting preasure on the dogs line will cause to to move away hence you can take the shorter more direct path.

Have not owned a basset yet I can not out run in a short sprint from a standing start in a straight line, however with some it close others not so much.
 

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Thanks for the warning

for those who think bassets are slow, I have a $20 dollar bill for anybody who can bring any of my bassets back to me after they have started running a rabbit. You have 5 minutes to claim the money
Next time I see you at a hunt and you ask me if I'd like to run one of your hounds.............I'll think twice!
 

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not going to be to effective covering the ground need on leash


i think i would have a hard time chasing him with the bird in his mouth.
You tring to say yer so slow ya can't catch a basset
I'd put money on the fact that you can't catch our rescue boy when he's running. He's VERY fast for most dogs much less a basset.
 

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gsally,

the hounds know the routine, and at the end of the hour will generally stop if you are within about 20 - 30 feet. At the AKC field trial they run for about 5 minutes, and my hounds do not want to stop.

At the Spring National, Muttley was called back in third place, and ran against the other 3 hounds. I think it was too hot for the rest, but Muttley was doing great. He totally out did all others to win the champion class. The judges were ending the early runs as soon as he beat his bracemate, to not wear him out, but on the last run, they let him keep running. I had a 16 year old young lady running him. He got a good head start on her and she had a hard time catching up to him. Running down one path, she scared a rabbit out of a brush pile and it run across in front of her, she did not see it coming and kicked it.
 

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i think i would have a hard time chasing him with the bird in his mouth

The point is while it may be diffcult to capture a dog that does not want to be caught regardless of breed, that is not what is required to be suceesful. All that is required is getting the bird before the dog. In that case haveing only moderate speed and a knowledege of how dogs react it is pretty easy to keep a basset from getting to the bird first provided it does not have a huge head start.

Dogs like humans have a personal space, even when running Push into it and the dogs will move away. You can use this to ensure you the human always has the shortest path to the bird.

As Dean can attest it has been on more than one occassion I have pried the jaws of macey open to release a bunny. Admittedly the relatively confinded space did make this task much easier than it would have been out in the open,
 

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how I formed my preference

At the AKC field trial they run for about 5 minutes, and my hounds do not want to stop.
This is why I came to prefer the AHBA hunt over the AKC field trial. At the AHBA hunt, I got to observe close up the beauty of the hound freely hunting off leash! I screwed up my knee that day, it hasn't been the same since but that isn't going to stop me from participating once I get me a new basset..............and even if things don't work out for a match before the next hunt season, I know a guy who is willing to share his hounds.........hint, hint! Just hope he can pair old Sal with an old hound who enjoys the hunt but has been slowed by age, same as she! If I am lucky enough to find a new pup, I'll have to drop some weight and begin endurance training to keep up!
 

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gsally,

the hounds know the routine, and at the end of the hour will generally stop if you are within about 20 - 30 feet. At the AKC field trial they run for about 5 minutes, and my hounds do not want to stop.

At the Spring National, Muttley was called back in third place, and ran against the other 3 hounds. I think it was too hot for the rest, but Muttley was doing great. He totally out did all others to win the champion class. The judges were ending the early runs as soon as he beat his bracemate, to not wear him out, but on the last run, they let him keep running. I had a 16 year old young lady running him. He got a good head start on her and she had a hard time catching up to him. Running down one path, she scared a rabbit out of a brush pile and it run across in front of her, she did not see it coming and kicked it.
I LOVE Muttley! I remember him from the Elizabethtown hunt a couple years back, when I brought Hazley. I've got those pictures somewhere...
 
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