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Discussion Starter #1
Today around 1:15 my basset boy Gibbs (approx. 5 years old) started panting and shaking uncontrollably (sp?). He couldn't stand for a few minutes. He totally refused water (come to realize he hadn't eaten or drank all day). When he finally did stand it was like he was drunk falling over and all. I took him immediatly to the vet. Then of course he was acting totally fine. They did a full body test. Blood work, urinalisis (sp?), fecal, thyroid, etc. Everything came back fine. The vet said that her old dog used to do it a few times a year. Basically we just need to keep an eye on him. He sure did have me scared though!

~Heather

They just called back with the Thyroid test. They said that something in him (whatever the thyroid test tests) was in the normal range, but borderline low. They advised to keep an eye on him and if any thing comes up bring him back right away. They also suggested bringing him back in 6 months for another analysis to make sure nothing has changed.
 

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I remember seeing an episode of Emergency Vets where a dog or cat was "acting drunk." Turns out it was antifreeze poisoning. If Gibbs' tests came back okay, then apparently it isn't that, but this is a good opportunity to remind everyone that antifreeze tastes good to animals but is extremely dangerous.
 

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Wow, that does sound scary! I am glad to hear his tests came back in the normal range. Dogs sure do scare us sometimes!
 

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Dozer did the same thing a few months ago. First I thought he bloated again, but his tummy wasn't bloated this time. I held him for a few minutes, then he let out a big burp and everything was fine then. He had a vet appointment the next day, and when I asked the vet about it, she thought he may of had a gas bubble causing pressure on his chest, making it hard to breathe.
He had gotten into some leftovers on the counter earlier that night (same when he bloated the first time), so now I watch him carefully if he gets too much human food at one time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It was completely scarry (sp?) and totally bizarre. He hadn't gotten into anything that we could determine. Our weather has been crazy and it was a bit warm earlier today. It was warm enough for us to have our door open. So our best guess is that he got hot.. :huh:

~Heather
 

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Did the vet think it could have been a seizure?

Last year Murray had a weird episode- he was lounging on the couch with me- raised his head, stared into space for a bit, then fell off the couch- lay there shaking, tried to get up and started staggering around the room and falling-by the time I got him to the vets he was acting OK, and the bloodwork didn't show anything.

Our vet thought he had a seizure and told us to watch him. Nothing like this has ever happened again, but it scared me to death, I didn't know what was going on and thought he was poisoned or having a heart attack.

I hope this is a once and done episode for Gibbs, whatever the cause!
 

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Did they check his blood sugar levels?
I have a cat that acts exactly like that sometimes, turns out he has become diabetic.
The condition you describe is exactly what happens when my cat has a too high low sugar level.

The cat was diagnosed 2 years ago, and ever since he gets 2 injections of insuline a day. You'd see the cat you wouldn't even suspect that he's diabetic. We know, as we've gone through some crisises ourselves (like the cat vomiting just after the injection so that the insuline doesn't get accumulated in the blood and the sugar level drops dramatically). What we do in these cases is force-feed sugar water (1 cup of water with at least 5 table spoons of sugar). The crisis goes over in half an hour or so, after having watched what looks like a very drunk cat.

If the vet didn't check for diabetes, ask him to do so. It's a life threatening condition, but with the correct treatment, there's nothing to worry about.

Greetz

Patrick

PS: the cat in question is 12 years old in the mean time, has been treated with steroids and cortizone due to an auto immune reaction. This treatment probably caused the diabetes, but he's still with us, and when I look at him, he'll be for another few years.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The vet thinks that it was a seizure. She said that she had a dog of her own who used to seisure a few times a year, but never enough to go on medication. We're going to keep a watch on things and take him back if anything comes up, and we'll also take him back in 6 months to get re-checked to make sure everthing is okay. During all of this his sister Lily was lunging at him and rolling on top of him trying to get him to play. She was very mad when we left the house with him and not her, but when we got home (after being gone for about 4 hours) he certianly wasn't bragging about the trip. ;)

~Heather

They did a full body test. I mean I couldn't even tell you what all they tested for (though I have the sheet out in my car)...let's just say it was over $200 worth of tests. :blink:
 

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It's good that you had the tests ...just to rule serious things out. Sounds like a seizure, though.

We went through an episode last week, after a Christmas Party. Belvedere had serious "Tummy Troubles" for two days. Not enough to get dehydrated because I stayed on top of it ...but he defintely had some pain ~back there~ from going potty so much. Tail was down and tucked, etc. I am convinced that someone fed him something or maybe even gave him some beer or something like that. I was REALLY MAD :angry: to think that a friend may have caused this. I'm still investigating.

It's good we all keep an eye on our dogs and watch for signs of trouble. I hope Gibbs won't have another episode.
 

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I remember seeing an episode of Emergency Vets where a dog or cat was "acting drunk." Turns out it was antifreeze poisoning. If Gibbs' tests came back okay, then apparently it isn't that, but this is a good opportunity to remind everyone that antifreeze tastes good to animals but is extremely dangerous.[/b]
Just wanted to say that my husband told me that most manufacturers of antifreeze now add something to it to make it taste bitter. It no longer tastes sweet. There had been too many pet-poisonings and even children had been poisoned by the sweet-tasting antifreeze. My husband is an auto tech at a Chrysler dealership who also does side-work at home. I was concerned when a car he was working on leaked antifreeze in our garage. While he is still diligent about cleaning it up, he told me this little bit of info as he was wiping up the mess, easing my mind a little... but only a little.
 

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I agree with Patrick, if a random glucose level wasn't included on the blood panel that the vet drew, see if they can either used the leftover serum or draw another one. Good luck, I hope it isn't anything serious!
 

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I'd vote for seizure. Herman started having them once or twice a year when he was about eight. The first time he woke up, staggered around for a few seconds like he was choking, and then completely keeled over with a crash. I thought he'd dropped dead. He came to in about 30 seconds. After we figured this out I just tried to make sure he wouldn't hurt himself when he toppled over. Whatever you do don't put your fingers in his mouth, unless you've got some to spare.
 

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My childhood basset named Bud, once had a seizure and fell into the swimming pool!

My folks called the police (this was in the 1960's) and a motorcycle policeman came out and did a modified mouth breathing on Bud and he vomited up a bunch of water and was fine. I've always thought that this was very brave of the policeman.

It was so scary for all of us! I've since learned that some bassets are prone to seizures. Every once in a while, Ruby will be outside and stand funny on one leg, get a bizarre look on her face and the leg will start shaking. If I yell her name, she sort of comes out of it. It's happened about 3 times; once as a puppy and twice in the past year. I've told the vet and all that gets done is it gets written in her chart (just like when I tell my doctors about something bizarre that my body does.)

Janice and little Ruby
 

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Sounds like a seizure to me too. Tina started with them earlier this year. She was just about 2 and a half years old. She had a couple of smallish ones but has ended up on phenobarbital. Everything was going good with this until last Saturday when she started again. After her first one all her blood tests came back as clear but the vet did some research and came up with the diagnosis of epilepsy.

Hope Gibbs is OK and doesn't give you any more scares.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks everyone for the thoughts. Gibbs is doing great. I'm still keeping an eye on him and fully plan on having him reevaluated in June.

~Heather
 

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One of the potential adverse reactions to vaccinations is seizures -- has your dog recently been vaccinated?

Significant calcium deficiency can cause seizure-like episodes, have you had a blood test to check calcium and phosphorous levels? High phosphorous foods (meat, eggs, nuts) bind with calcium, as do high oxalate foods (oatmeal) and may deplete your dog's levels to a point where it will cause problems. Poison will also cause seizures.

You might want to do an online search for "canine hypocalcemia" or just "hypocalcemia". This link http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/breeding/eclampsia.htm will take you to an article on this subject in which it states that the signs of low calcium levels (hyocalcemia) are: "Muscle tremors, restlessness, panting, incoordination, grand mal seizures and fever as high as 106."

Further, the above articles thats a one of the possible causes: Poor Nutrition - "Home brewed" diets usually are at fault. The owner innocently may be adding too much unbalanced meat to the bitch's diet, thinking the extra protein is beneficial. What's really happening is the calcium to phosphorus ratio is out of balance because the amount of useful calcium in the food is actually reduced! The ideal contains a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1.2 to 1. (Many organ meats such as liver have a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1 to 15!! Liver is great for dogs but if it comprises a large part of the diet, the calcium/phosphorus ratio of the diet will be improper.)

If you have chickens, you should be aware that their droppings are extremely high in phosphorous and can cause a problem if your dog eats too many of them. If the droppings are charging your dog's blood with phosphorous, it's going to drain him/her of calcium in order to maintain proper pH balance and cause muscle twitching, etc...

Check this link HPA | Phosphorous | FAQs on phosphorous from the Health Protection Agency, especially this quote: "It has been used as a rat and rodent poison.."

Check this site Eclampsia (Puerperal Tetany, Milk Fever, Hypocalcemia) in Dogs "Eclampsia, also called milk fever or puerperal tetany, is an acute, life-threatening disease caused by low blood calcium levels (hypocalcemia) in dogs ...."

One of our dogs developed severe seizures after the second of his puppy rabies shots -- his head shook so hard we thought his eyes would pop out, it was terrifying. After this seizure activity triggered by the vaccine, he became prone to them from other triggers. Whenever he ate too many high phosphorous foods (or chicken droppings), he would seize. Giving him 1/2 a quart of plain organic yogurt would calm his seizures within 15 minutes, when they were food-related.

Personally, I would have a complete blood count done to check for mineral levels if you don't think vaccines or something your dog is eating is causing the seizures. PLUS, I would consult a Homeopathic/Holistic veterinarian for an alternative treatment.

Kris L. Christine
Founder, Co-Trustee
THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen...s06Revised.pdf .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you for the information. Gibbs hasn't had any more scares and we plan on taking him back in a few months for a re-check to make sure all is still fine.

~Heather
 

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They just called back with the Thyroid test. They said that something in him (whatever the thyroid test tests) was in the normal range, but borderline low.~Heather[/b]

Low and even low normal thyroid function are implicatedes as causitive of seizures.

Connection Between Low Thyroid and Seizures

THYROID CAN ALTER BEHAVIOR
The third group of dogs showing aberrant behavior consists of those that experience seizure or seizure-like disorders beginning in puberty and continuing to mid-life. These are dogs that appear perfectly healthy outwardly and have normal hair coats and energy, but suddenly experience seizures for no apparent reason. The seizures are often spaced several weeks to months apart, and occasionally they appear in a brief cluster. In some cases the animals become aggressive and attack those around them shortly before or after having one of these seizure episodes.[/b]
 
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