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Hi everyone!
My husband and I are going to be getting our 8 week old female basset on Saturday.

We plan to crate train her while we are at work and at night and let her out as much as we can when we are home.

My advice is, what are good tips, as far as potty training goes? So far, what I have planned is that when she goes potty outside, I’ll praise her and give her a treat.

We also have a older female black lab, do you think that may help, as far as potty training goes?
 

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I was not able to use a crate with my Bassett. We have one in our living room but she has never been in it but one time. Bassett's are notorious to have separation anxiety and will bark relentlessly in the crate until they go hoarse. Also they will try to get out of the crate and tear it apart without regard to the harm they do to themselves. As far as treats when they potty they are super intelligent and so my Piper would pretend to potty to get a treat. We have an older lab which comes in handy because she will not go outside alone. We have to make him get up and go out on her schedule. She is now a year old. She barks atcus when she wants to go outside, when she wants a treat, when she needs water, and if she wants to play or go for a walk. Same bark. We just have to go figure out what she wants. She sometimes will bring me my shoes for a walk but I can't leave them where she can get them because she chews them up. All I got to say is enjoy your Bassett and love them. They are different from any dog I ever had and their quirkiness will make you love them more than any dog you have ever had. Mine gets upset when I am getting dressed to leave and will do anything to delay me. She has even wrapped my purse around her body in a way that looks like someone did it fir her to take a picture. Good luck and remember patience is the key.
 

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crate training comes down to building value to be in the crate and not simply putting the dog in the crate as as prison cell,. If value of being in the crate is note developed first there are going to be issue but crate training is a safety priority for all dog. it in creases safety while traveling and in emergency or evacuation situation it is often a matter of life or death. In reality a good breed will have done of most of the heavy lifting of properly introducing the puppy to a crate but if that is not the case i would recommend Susan Garrett’s Crate Games Online - DogsThat

 

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the single most important job you have with a puppy this age is teaching bite inhibition.
Rather than "No bite," I strongly, strongly, strongly urge you to teach your puppy bite inhibition instead. Bite inhibition is a "soft mouth." It teaches the pup how to use his mouth gently. Does this mean that the pup will forever be mouthing you? No, not at all. Actually, regardless of the method used, puppies generally grow out of mouthing behavior after a few months.

So why should you teach bite inhibition? Because dogs have one defense: their teeth. Every dog can bite. If frightened enough or in pain or threatened, your dog will bite. That doesn't in any way make him a "bad" dog. It makes him a dog. It's your responsibility, therefore, to teach your dog that human skin is incredibly fragile. If you teach your dog bite inhibition that training will carry over even if he is later in a position where he feels forced to bite.

A story... Ian Dunbar tells a story of a bite incident he had to asses. A Golden Retriever therapy dog was leaving a nursing home and his tail was accidentally shut in a car door. The owner went to help, and the dog delivered four Level Four bites before she could react.

FYI, a standard scale has been developed to judge the severity of dog bites, based on damage inflicted. The scale is:

  • Level One: Bark, lunge, no teeth on skin.
  • Level Two: Teeth touched, no puncture.
  • Level Three: 1-4 holes from a single bite. All holes less than half the length of a single canine tooth.
  • Level Four: Single bite, deep puncture (up to one and a half times the depth of a single canine tooth), wound goes black within 24 hours.
  • Level Five: Multiple bite attack or multiple attack incidents.
  • Level Six: Missing large portions of flesh.

Technically, the woman received a Level Five bite from a long-time therapy dog. Dr. Dunbar wasn't the least bit surprised by the bites. I mean, the dog got his tail shut in a car door! Of course he bit! What shocked Dr. DUnbar was that a dog with no bite inhibition was being used as a therapy dog.

"But he's never bitten before." Of course not. And barring an accident like that, he probably never would have. But an accident is just that. An accident. Unpredicted. What if it had happened in the nursing home?





 

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Hi everyone!
My husband and I are going to be getting our 8 week old female basset on Saturday.

We plan to crate train her while we are at work and at night and let her out as much as we can when we are home.

My advice is, what are good tips, as far as potty training goes? So far, what I have planned is that when she goes potty outside, I’ll praise her and give her a treat.

We also have a older female black lab, do you think that may help, as far as potty training goes?
I'll leave the copy and pasting to others but for how long are you going to be out at work? Alarm bells rang big time because even with the company of another canine (and be aware, the older dog shouldn't attack her provided you are there to control the puppy but if pushed, he/she might) Bassets don't do well left alone for hours and crates were never intended to be used the way it seems you might be intending to use it. Puppies need to be able to run around so their bone and muscle develop as they should, to say nothing of mental development.

ALL you need to know should be asked of her breeder, especially early days.

I hope it all goes to plan of course, but be aware, again, Bassets need their owners around as much as possible these days. We didn't sell our puppies to people who were working full-time. And further, we didn't have our first Basset until we could afford for me to stop working full time. Had that not been possible, there'd have been no Basset (or any other dog for that matter).
 

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Hiya mngirl,,, i just joined with a 5 month old basset,,, we got a cage, and she sleeps in the laundry room (completely dark) with no problems, and she holds herself until morning... at night, we put a few pieces of kibble in the cage and she goes in,, if one of us gets up in the middle of the night, we let her out for a pee, otherwise she doesnt go in the cage,,, you can put a blanket or sheet over the cage to make it feel more secure or add heat...
if you plan on having the pup in there for an 8 hour day,, you might want a different breed,,, bassets cant handle it... they need 24/7 the first 5 to 6 months.. youll have to take pawternity leave.... ok, not giving up my day job...

for potty training,, we got her at 9 weeks, and it was hit and miss,,, what finally worked,,, every 15 to 30 minutes id put her out on the grass and say "toilet",, when she'd' go, id let her in the house,, 20 minutes later, id carry her back out to the grass and say toilet,,, we did this over and over again, but it worked quickly,,, she fakes peeing now so she can come inside.... by the way,,, she hadnt gone in the house for over a month,, it was raining the other day and she didnt want to go outside,, we found she pee'd in the bathroom right in front of the toilet..... lol,,,, need i say more???

as far as the other dog,,,, bassets are known to "untrain" trained dogs.... bassets are unlike any dog, or animal i have ever encountered,,, they are weird and awesome at the same time,,, good luck....
 

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Hi everyone!
My husband and I are going to be getting our 8 week old female basset on Saturday.

We plan to crate train her while we are at work and at night and let her out as much as we can when we are home.

My advice is, what are good tips, as far as potty training goes? So far, what I have planned is that when she goes potty outside, I’ll praise her and give her a treat.

We also have a older female black lab, do you think that may help, as far as potty training goes?
Yes, definitely having another dog helps. We are on our fourth rescue basset--Dory is 9 and we have had her for 4 years. She had never been crated until her owner had to be hospitalized and she was kenneled for 2-3 months. Shortly after coming to us she needed ACL surgery and had to be crated for times we weren't around. We set it up, left the door open prior to surgery so she could get used to it. Old dogs do new learn new tricks. She has had to use it again a few times for recovery and no problems. I did read that a trainer (on this site actually) used to put the kennel beside her bed so the pup could see her at night. I wish I had known that earlier with our pups years ago. With pups get the largest one you can afford and have space for them to grow into, put a box in it it fit their space while small so they don't use it to pee and adjust as they grow. It works and patience is key. If you can take time off when you get her/him to spend time training, leave in the crate for bits of time while you are around so they don't get separation anxiety. They are pack dogs and need to know their people will come back! Good luck! And aside story--my son has a mix rescue and had to return to work after pandemic. He has always had the crate set up but rarely used it until now. Has a dog walker who comes in daily. Cassie was put in the crate but the first day the dog walker came she met him at the door. Could not figure out how that happened. But one day my son was working from home, the dog walker showed up and Cassie ran right into her crate to wait for the walker to put the leash on! So funny!!
 
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