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Dear All,
I wanted to research the possibilties of breeding. Let me first say, this is research I have no plans to do this anytime soon. And my houndie is spayed. But, I wanted to find out how you get started as a breeder without being considered a backyard breeder. My interest in breeding is that I have fallen in love with bassets and would only do it in promotion of the breed, not for profit and not on any kind of schedule again in the interest of profit.
Of course bloodlines are important/critical and I would think good performance and confirmation/health. But how does one sort of "get" into the breeding side of things?
I hope these questions make sense and are taken in the spirit intended.
 

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For most it means becomming envolved with conformation, and develops from there. You build a foundation of what a basset should look like and some common faults, alon with a better understand of the strengths and faults of various lines. You can then developing a mentor relationship with another more experienced breeder who you admire.

[ October 03, 2005, 04:52 PM: Message edited by: Toughynutter ]
 

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I usually recommend starting with a show MALE. You are not intending to breed this guy (unless he turns out to be outstanding), he is your learning dog. The reason I suggest a male is that a breeder is more likely to have a show quality male available than a female (one can only keep so many males). With this dog you will learn about showing, meet breeders, learn the standard, and basically participate in the world of dogs.

Start going to lots of shows, meet the breeders, look at the dogs. Get to know people. Which of them seem to have a breeding philosophy that you agree with? Which of them seem willing to help newcomers? Which seem to be knowledgeable? Avoid breeders who have nothing good to say about the competition, or seem to be in cliques. Attend specialty shows if possible, you'll see the most dogs there. If you get a chance to go to the Nationals, there are many opportunities for education, I highly recommend it. Join your local basset hound club, and the national one too if you can. And join a local all-breed kennel club. Read the standard. Learn about what bassets "do". Go see some field trials and learn how bassets are supposed to work. The standard is supposed to describe a working dog, so you need to learn why certain features are called for and how much is too much. Once you've found a breeder you think you'd like to work with, get a show male from them. He's your "introduction" and others will be watching you and deciding what they think of you. If you make a good impression on the breeders, someone will be willing to sell you a quality bitch to start breeding. Don't be in a rush with these things, it takes a while to even know what you want in a bitch. Once you know what you're looking for and what you're willing to accept, then go looking for your bitch.

Now, you don't have to go QUITE as slowly as I did (I was showing in conformation and obedience for 7 years before I bought a bitch, and for 10 years before I had my first litter), but do give yourself time to gather information before rushing into it.

Showing, training, trialing, and breeding quality dogs can become a fascinating obsession.

[ October 03, 2005, 06:03 PM: Message edited by: Soundtrack ]
 

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and if your not into shows you can field trial!! go to the Basset Hound Club of America website www.basset-bhca.org you can find breeders in your Area.there is a wonderful woman by the name of Ruth Paule who is in North Carolina and has dogs that are just beauitful and multi-titled,you could not go wrong with starting with her line of hounds!!
 

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LOL, Billy, I knew after I posted you were gonna get me for that!

Yes, field trials are also where the quality of a dog is proven. Conformation and Field are the two areas dependent on a good breeding program. The other venues, while a lot of fun, do not give an indication of how good a BASSET the dog is.

The ideal is to do both. And yes, Ruth would be a good source for a dog for either endeavor.

[ October 04, 2005, 07:51 AM: Message edited by: Soundtrack ]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks everyone for all your advice and support. I am planning to start very slowly, as I mentioned Lily is spayed so there will be limits to what I can show her, but I do plan to do things with her other than therapy work. My trainer has a nice agility set up at her place and I was thinking that and the local kennel club might get me started in the right direction. But, I wanted to get advice from other houndie folks.
Billy, I have thought about tracking, but have had a hard time reaching the local club. I have found one lady who is willing to work with Lily and I. There are just so many opportunities!
Thanks again.
 

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tracking from what i've seen and that was limited looked fun,but not for me.i was born to run!!!!
 

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Great suggestions from everyone. I think it's really important to find a mentor and to get involved in your local basset hound club. Unless you have an interest in conformation or field trials it's not likely that someone is going to sell you a dog that's finishable, meaning able to achieve a conformation or field trial championship.

So start going to shows and/or field trials so you can get to know basset breeders. Also local basset clubs usually have matches which are practice dog shows. This is a great place to meet and talk to breeders as they're not under pressure as they can be at dog shows, especially when they are waiting ringside to show their dog.

And a good place to start is contacting someone from the Potomac Basset Hound Club

[ October 10, 2005, 12:45 PM: Message edited by: Barbara Winters ]
 
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