Basset Hounds Forum banner
21 - 38 of 38 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
Like I said all puppies are cute. We can't tell a thing from people holding the pups. Look we are not against this so called "breeder" we probably do not know them we are giving you our opinions from what you have showed us. The photos of the parents were not bad angles their legs are really pretty awful and maybe,just maybe, the puppies legs won't be that bad ,maybe. That is just hoping no other problems show up later. Puppies are not cheap to raise so 'Breeder's" getting higher prices for their puppies are,in general, not over priced. By the time the eyes on the parents are checked for glaucoma,the blood tested for thrombpathia(a bleeding disorder)and other problems the parents should be cleared of before breeding the breeder has a lot more invested in a litter,even with a higher price for the puppies they will never be reimbursed for the time put into raising a healthy litter for 8 to 12 weeks. To know what a basset should look like go to the BHCA site to read what the standard says a basset should look like. We are trying to help you but I'm afraid Soundtrack is right. We would rather not pick apart someone's dog but you asked.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Ugh, this is what I hate about forums. I have sugar gliders and I'm on a forum for them as well. I'm sorry SoundTrack but you come across as abrasive, but I'm sure you're already aware of that.
There are rarely "right" answers on forums, but merely opinions from many different people.
I use forums as a tool, and if I am to raise a basset I would love the opinions from here on out, of experienced owners and one day I too will be one and can pass on my knowledge to others.
Everyones opinions have helped and I now know what questions to ask the breeders. Once I have answers from them, I will ask some more.
I wouldn't be asking, if my mind was made up.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,219 Posts
Absolutely, email the breeders. Maybe you will be able to find someone on there who will give you their phone number and you can call them, talk to them and find what you are looking for.
Soundtrack is really just trying to help you. She is a very experienced breeder so she does know what she's talking about. Really, we are all just trying to help you make an informed decision.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
Here is my opinion.

If you are going to buy a "purebred" puppy, you need to be careful that you are not supporting backyard breeders or puppy mills. You have pictures of the parents so I assume it's not a mill, but this sounds like a backyard breeder to me. In my opinion, backyard breeders are a plague to dogs. If you insist on buying a puppy, I would definitely listen to what the experienced and reputable breeders here on these forums suggest. Considering the puppy is something you will be investing thousands of dollars on over the next 10+ years of your life, I would suggest possibly expanding the budget in order to get a good dog from a reputable breeder. I don't want to sound harsh and I don't intend to, but if you are not willing to spend more than $250 on buying the puppy, will you be willing to spend the money on the vet bills? Stuff happens; I've spent almost $2000 on vet bills this year already. And the vet bills theoretically will only be higher with a cheaper "purebred" dog because problems are more likely to occur.

Personally I don't understand the fascination in buying puppies unless you intend to show the dog or engage in other competitive activities.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
There are a few reasons I'd like to have a puppy. The first is i have heard bassets can be very stubborn and hard to train. I work from home and have plenty of time to spend training a puppy to insure he has good training. Another is the bond you create with a puppy.
Is the consensus that with dealing with purebred, they can have more genetic problems than cross breeds?
I'm am into the the idea of getting a more expensive dog, i just can't find one without driving so far i'd have to get a hotel. I like the idea of being able to check the pups out and make a decision. I'm afraid if i drove a great distance i would feel obligated to make a purchase and not go on my gut instinct.

Thanks!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Not so Sure

After finding the breeder's ad on breeders.net:
http://www.breeders.net/detail.php?id=211530
http://www.breeders.net/detail.php?id=211530
....I'm not getting warm fuzzies about these guys. At the time the ad was posted they were saying the pups were 5 weeks old. That seems quite young to be selling puppies and taking them from their mother. :confused:

You are free to do as you want regarding getting these puppies, but you obviously came to this forum for experienced Basset owners' opinions. And while they are just that (opinions. But, INFORMED opinions), you would do well to take the warnings that these experienced people are offering. They know the breed and some are breeders themselves and know what to look for in a healthy Basset Hound dog / puppy. The fact that several are raising a red flag for the same reasons should be a good warning sign to you. If you are willing to listen, that is.

If you are dead set on getting a puppy from this breeder and no amount of warning or caution will deter you I say this: Good luck. I very sincerely hope your new puppy is happy and healthy. But be ready to take many trips to the vet with some very high bills.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
Is the consensus that with dealing with purebred, they can have more genetic problems than cross breeds?
You will hear many differing opinions about this. Purebreds have inherent genetic problems. Statistically and scientifically speaking, a larger gene pool means that genetic problems which are ultimately the result of inbred mutations will be less likely to occur. That is why pet insurance charges more for most (maybe all) breeds than a mixed dog. I would pay nearly double for my 8 year old basset hound's insurance than I do for my 10 year old medium mixed breed.

It's possible for the opposite to happen though. If you take two different breeds with, say, heart problems, and put them together, the puppies may have worse problems than either of the purebred parents.

You can increase the odds of getting a healthy dog by either buying from a reputable breeder that breeds for health or buying a mutt. I think just about everyone would agree though that a "purebred" dog from a bad breeder is probably the most likely to have health problems. But there's still a lot of luck involved since every dog is an individual.

There are a few reasons I'd like to have a puppy. The first is i have heard bassets can be very stubborn and hard to train. I work from home and have plenty of time to spend training a puppy to insure he has good training. Another is the bond you create with a puppy.
That's true, but the same applies to both adults and puppies. I did obedience training with Anabelle this year and she is 8 years old. While she wasn't the star of the class, she was just willing and able to learn as any of the younger dogs. You might be surprised what a basset hound would be willing to do for a hot dog. Many adult dogs already have some training, as well. Even if they forgot, it's easier to remind a dog to do something than it is to start from scratch. A dog that's been in a foster home will probably have training from his foster parents.

The idea that you create a different or better bond with a puppy is a myth that I think just about anyone who's adopted an adult dog could disprove. The strongest bonds I have ever had to dogs are to dogs that were adopted fully grown. To me it's just as silly as saying that a person can't create friendships in adulthood, only in childhood. Some dogs are more shy than others but I've never met a basset hound that I'd be worried about making a bond with someone. We adopted Anabelle at 8 years old and she has formed a strong bond with my husband who also works from home. She literally will not leave his side. Some have even suggested that puppies must reform bonds once they reach adulthood anyway, though I don't think there's any proof of that.

I'm not trying to change your mind or sway your opinion, just offering my $.02 from my own experience.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,082 Posts
I'm not intending to be abrasive or mean, tone is hard to judge over the internet and things are often taken not in the spirit in which they were intended.

Is the consensus that with dealing with purebred, they can have more genetic problems than cross breeds?
No, but a poorly bred dog is more likely to have genetic problems than a well-bred one. For example, a responsible breeder would not breed a dog with such bad front legs, because they do not want to increase their chances of producing puppies that will have such problems. But I've seen plenty of "pet" breeders breeding dogs that have serious health, structural and/or temperament issues, completely oblivious of the fact that they are creating more of the same. Granted, there are no guarantees, we are dealing with living creatures. You could get a wonderful dog from this breeder, you could get a problem dog from a good breeder. However, the odds are more in your favor with the good breeder.

The main difference in health issues between purebreds and mixed breeds is that purebreds are likely to have more incidences of fewer problems, while mixed breeds have fewer incidences of more problems.

For example: say out of 100 purebreds of a certain breed you get 10 with problems. The problems might break down as 5 Hip dysplasia, 3 epilepsy, 2 glaucoma. If you take 100 mutts, you'll still get 10 with problems, but they will be ten different problems.

The other difference is in reporting. Purebred dogs are generally routinely screened for issues (which ones depends on the breed), so they are more likely to be detected, whereas a mixed breed will not be screened unless a problem is apparent.

Another is perception. If you take your Boxer into the vet and he has cardiac issues, most vets will say "it comes with the breed". If you take in a mongrel with cardiac issues "well, these things happen". Vets are not immune to these misconceptions and biases.

I'm am into the the idea of getting a more expensive dog, i just can't find one without driving so far i'd have to get a hotel. I like the idea of being able to check the pups out and make a decision. I'm afraid if i drove a great distance i would feel obligated to make a purchase and not go on my gut instinct.

Thanks!
I'm sure if you contact the Colorado members they can find a good breeder that is closer to you. You might also try going to local shows and meeting breeders there. That way you can check out people that may live farther away, and see what they and their dogs are like without having to travel too far. You MAY have to wait for the right puppy, but since that puppy will hopefully live at least 12-13 years the wait will be worth it.

In my opinion, it's more important to select a breeder than a puppy. If you are getting a puppy from a good breeder, ALL of the puppies have the same planning, care, nutrition, socializing etc as their next champion show dog. Generally speaking, the "worst" puppy from such a litter is a much better bet than the "best" puppy bred by a poor breeder.

It may sound like we're harping on this, but some of us have been around the breed for a long time - long enough to see LOTS of puppy buyers whose sole criteria were things like "cute puppies", "nice people", "close" and "cheap" - and to see them regret it later. Those of us who are involved in rescue see the results all the time. I've counselled lots of people who obtained their Basset from a dubious source, and now that they're having difficulties the breeder is nowhere to be seen. I would like to see your "basset experience" be a positive one - with a healthy puppy that looks and acts like a Basset should, from a breeder that cares and who will be more than happy to provide support and advice when you need it.

Another point to ponder: I'm assuming that because you specifically want a Basset Hound, there are traits of appearance and personality that you find attractive. If you want those traits, you want to go to someone who is specifically breeding for them, not someone who is simply putting two dogs together because they happen to be of the same breed. If you don't care about the things that make a Basset Hound special, then you might as well simply adopt a nice mixed breed or rescue dog. At least with a rescue dog/puppy you will get a dog that has been evaluated, brought up to snuff medically, and you have the resources of the rescue to help you should you need it.
 

· Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,082 Posts
After finding the breeder's ad on breeders.net:
Breeders.NET

....I'm not getting warm fuzzies about these guys.
Another red flag is that they appear to be breeding multiple breeds. Their primary breed seems to be Mastiffs, plus they have Miniature Dachshunds and Chihuahuas. While it is possible for a good breeder to have more than one breed, four is pushing it, especially when the breeds are so different.

Other issues: CKC registration is generally considered to be worthless. The Continental Kennel Club (not Canadian Kennel Club), will register a Guinea Pig as a Yorkie if you can get someone you know to sign a piece of paper saying that's what it is. Good breeders don't use it.

Finally, a one year health guarantee is pretty much worthless, since most major issues won't appear until the dog is at least two. And I'm willing to bet that you would have to return the puppy to collect on the "guarantee" (I recommend checking that out), which of course you won't do because by the time a problem is apparent you will love the puppy too much to send it back.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I will tell you right now the hard to train is a myth, I adopted a rescue last year almost 20 months ago she was 3 when I got her and so severely abused the horror stories I could tell you. It has taken extensive training to overcome the fears she had from the trauma she suffered, but all the basics she got right away and she had been an outside dog.

As for puppy training it all depends on you, set your puppy up to succeed and you will be successful set the pup up to fail and you will say pup is hard to train. We brought Bella home at 9 weeks potty training took me about 3 but she only had 3 accidents, why because I didn't set her up to fail. We kept our eyes glued to her, kept her blocked off in the living room with us at all times, knew to take her out after feedings 10-15 min after a drink, when she woke up, when she was done playing. When I was busy and couldn't keep my eyes on her she was either on a leash attached to my waist or in her crate for a nap. I slept on the couch the first 2 months she was here, my son and hubby took their turns when they were off and we let her out at night when she needed it. Puppies generally can hold 1 hour for each month of age at night, which I think is a little longer then that actually on an 8 hour night she would wake us twice, but all puppies vary. Puppies don't like to potty where they sleep but will if they have no choice from not being let out. If you work you better plan on coming and letting the puppy out a couple times a day or have someone who can let puppers out, or that will set you up to fail almost immediately if you fail to come home during the day to let them out to potty, and come home to a messed in crate. Not to mention the feedings when they are young, hopefully you have considered all of this and made arrangements of some kind?

It is not that the puppies don't need a good home no one is disputing that, you came here and asked our opinions based on the pictures you provided, and we all explained why if you are opting to go the puppy route what you need to look out for. Have you considered an older dog or a puppy from rescue, the rescues have all ages, and work with other rescue groups and could be a tremendous help to you. They are fostered so the foster mom or dad can tell you all about the dog to find you the perfect fit. Being new to the breed maybe that is a better option (they have puppies too, since your wanting to give a puppy a new home) or a young dog 1 year and up? The only reason I went with a puppy the second time around is Lolly was not accepting of adult dogs coming into her home and loved the puppies begging for our neighbors puppy.

You must also understand how many of us have had people come into our lives doing this very thing and then the dog ends up at a rescue or becomes too expensive with health costs for the owner to keep it.

When talking to the breeders ask them about retired dogs, a lot of breeders reputable breeders do a couple of things, keep a puppy they think has potential and the puppy is great but not quality to show so they part with it at an older age. Or they have a breeding stock that they have a few litters and retire to a forever home. Both of those are wonderful situations to be in.

Bo
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,873 Posts
I will tell you right now the hard to train is a myth
This comes about because bassets are less bidable ( willing to please) they do not do stuff to please an owner, they do stuff to please themselves. Training becomes easier when you align the desires of the dogs with what you want them to do. If a basset has a reasonable assumption that when you call it will recieve a taste morsel it is a hell of a lot more likely to stop chasing a squirrel than if what he normal recieves from a recall is a pat on the head. Those of us the have worked withtraining basset understand in many ways they are much more intelligent and actually easier to train than some of the socalled easy to train breed. Require less repititions etc.

for exam mariah in the vidio link below was I year old rescue with fear biting issues. She was competing in agility in less than 8 mnth later.

Grand Prix

the following links I find deal with the myth of hard to train the best

Hard to Train?
A look at "difficult-to-train" breeds and the reality of what shapes these canine minds.

Media Hound, Front and Finish: July 1994
Review of Stanley Coren's Intelligence of Dogs
Coren's analysis of working or obedience intelligence is by far the weakest link in his book.

...

Unfortunately, the methodology underlying Coren's conclusions is extremely faulty. All Coren has managed to do is to obtain a rough list of the success of various breeds in the sport of dog obedience in North America; jumping from that to the number of repetitions it took the various dogs to learn commands is impossible. We can even use Coren himself to challenge his own methodology. In his analysis of adaptive intelligence, Coren includes an interesting canine IQ test. The "CIQ" consists of twelve separate tests, designed to assess the dog's learning and problem-solving ability. I tested two dogs: Connie, my own basset hound (a breed ranked in the bottom tier of intelligence) and Dream, a border collie (a member of the top echelon). The results were interesting. Connie scored in the "brilliant" category, a group that fewer than five percent of the dogs in Coren's standardization group reached (no, I didn't skew the results!). Dream, on the other hand, scored in the low average range of intelligence, where, according to Coren, a dog will need to work rather hard to understand what is required of it. Connie has obedience scores which range from a low of 173 to a high of 186; she currently has two legs on her UD (and plenty of NQ's in our quest for that elusive third leg). Dream is an OTCH who has garnered many high in trials and placed at this year's Gaines Classic. Clearly, an obedience judge seeing the two dogs in the ring would conclude that Dream was by far the easier dog to train. Yet such was not the case. Connie is an extremely quick study who retains what she learns. Dream, according to her handler, always has difficulty learning and retaining new behaviors. Obviously, only erroneous conclusions could be drawn from their respective ring performances as to the amount of time and repetition it took them to learn the commands. The most striking difference between the two dogs is a personality issue, not a matter of anything that can be labeled "intelligence." Although Coren devotes a full chapter to what he terms the "personality factor," he does not seem to realize how critical a role it plays in the obedience ring. Connie is like many bassets: she's bright and happy to learn if you can convince her that the learning was her idea in the first place (i.e., if you train with food). But she doesn't have a strong sense of duty; if she's under stress or a bit distracted, she'd as soon not obey a command as obey it. Let's indulge in speculation and generalization for a moment, dangerous though it might be. Bassets are perfectly capable of shutting down entirely under stress; more than anything else, their tendency toward negative stress management is the reason why judges see so many slow-moving, tail-drooping, lagging bassets in the ring. Border collies are an entirely different story. Once a behavior is learned, most border collies seem to perform regardless of stress; indeed, many respond to stress by getting sharper and sharper. Dream is not such a successful obedience dog because of her learning ability. She has excelled because, quite simply, she loves to perform in the ring in front of a crowd of spectators

When talking to the breeders ask them about retired dogs
An advanage of an older dog whether from a breeder or a rescue org is that you know what you are getting. Its personaility and behaviors are more bullet proof, A puppies personality is more prone to change as it develops.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
An advanage of an older dog whether from a breeder or a rescue org is that you know what you are getting. Its personaility and behaviors are more bullet proof, A puppies personality is more prone to change as it develops.
This is one of the main reasons that I adopt adult dogs. Also, adult dogs are generally not in high demand. Anabelle was in either a foster home or a shelter for many months before we adopted her. Because of this you are able to spend a lot of time with the dog before you adopt them. Just about all rescues (and many respectable breeders) will take a dog back if it doesn't work out. In fact most prefer that you bring the dog back if the situation isn't working out so that the dog can find a more suitable home. I'd give the dog at least a month or two to get acclimated before deciding it won't work out, though.

Many rescues even go the next step and allow you to have a trial period of sorts. I believe in the North Texas Basset rescue, you can foster a basset for a month before deciding whether or not to adopt. I believe the Best Friends rescue (Dogtown on TV) allows you to do overnight stays with a dog to get to know him before you make a decision.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Wow, you guys are amazing. For the last 2 months I've been reading everything I can on bassets but without having a hands on experience its really hard to tell what to look for.

I think I'm going to keep waiting. I emailed everyone on the BHCA breeders site, and haven't gotten a positive response but i'm going to keep my hopes up.

This seems like a great forum and I'm looking forward to being a member during this "experience". Hope i don't come across as too annoying, or curious.

Thanks!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Not annoying at all, I think we were taken aback a little when you asked for advice then wanted to kind of argue with us, when we actually had your best interest at heart. Especially a first time basset owner. There is no such thing as too curious that is how you learn, and if it's in anyone's power to help then we will. I actually belong to another forum but it's invite only by personal recommendation, and it has a much larger membership. (I think) but several of us belong to both. Glad you made the decision to wait I really think you will be happier in the long run. Good Luck, and don't despair if you don't hear back right away, ask for phone numbers and call them.

Bo =o)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,241 Posts
Summit...I'm glad that after reading up and getting opinions you are willing to wait. It will be worth it! I've never had a puppy (both of mine are rescues), but from being a member of this site I have learned a tremendous amount of info from the experienced owners and breeders on this site. There are a lot of people on here who really know their stuff. Good luck to you on the hunt for your Basset.

~Heather
 
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top