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The male looks like a puppy himself, the female appears to have orthopedic issues in the front end. Neither is what I would consider breeding quality. I would recommend looking elsewhere, based on those pictures.
 

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Color and markings are totally unimportant and not an indicatio of the quality of the breeding. They are purely a matter of preference.
The orthopedic problem and general lack of quality are of more concern. Bone/structure problemd can be passed to the pups, and can result in various problems like early arthritis, lameness, lack of stamina, even growth problems requiring corrective surgery. The lack of quality of the parents, combined with the ridiculously low price, indicates a breeder that either does not know what they are doing or does not care - either way corners have been cut, steps have been missed, and you are increasing your chances of ending up with a puppy with problems whose breeder has no further interest once they have the cash in hand.
How much does a puppy cost? Purchase price, adoption fees, discounts, expensive puppies, cheap puppies, and a bunch of other words. | Ruffly Speaking
 

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I am not quite sure WHY you are asking for opinions, when it is clear that you have already made up your mind and will purchase one of these puppies regardless of what anyone says.

Offhand I can think of three good breeders in Colorado. If you check the BHCA membership list I'm sure you can find more
Basset Hound Club of America Breeders Directory
 

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I'm not intending to be abrasive or mean, tone is hard to judge over the internet and things are often taken not in the spirit in which they were intended.

Is the consensus that with dealing with purebred, they can have more genetic problems than cross breeds?
No, but a poorly bred dog is more likely to have genetic problems than a well-bred one. For example, a responsible breeder would not breed a dog with such bad front legs, because they do not want to increase their chances of producing puppies that will have such problems. But I've seen plenty of "pet" breeders breeding dogs that have serious health, structural and/or temperament issues, completely oblivious of the fact that they are creating more of the same. Granted, there are no guarantees, we are dealing with living creatures. You could get a wonderful dog from this breeder, you could get a problem dog from a good breeder. However, the odds are more in your favor with the good breeder.

The main difference in health issues between purebreds and mixed breeds is that purebreds are likely to have more incidences of fewer problems, while mixed breeds have fewer incidences of more problems.

For example: say out of 100 purebreds of a certain breed you get 10 with problems. The problems might break down as 5 Hip dysplasia, 3 epilepsy, 2 glaucoma. If you take 100 mutts, you'll still get 10 with problems, but they will be ten different problems.

The other difference is in reporting. Purebred dogs are generally routinely screened for issues (which ones depends on the breed), so they are more likely to be detected, whereas a mixed breed will not be screened unless a problem is apparent.

Another is perception. If you take your Boxer into the vet and he has cardiac issues, most vets will say "it comes with the breed". If you take in a mongrel with cardiac issues "well, these things happen". Vets are not immune to these misconceptions and biases.

I'm am into the the idea of getting a more expensive dog, i just can't find one without driving so far i'd have to get a hotel. I like the idea of being able to check the pups out and make a decision. I'm afraid if i drove a great distance i would feel obligated to make a purchase and not go on my gut instinct.

Thanks!
I'm sure if you contact the Colorado members they can find a good breeder that is closer to you. You might also try going to local shows and meeting breeders there. That way you can check out people that may live farther away, and see what they and their dogs are like without having to travel too far. You MAY have to wait for the right puppy, but since that puppy will hopefully live at least 12-13 years the wait will be worth it.

In my opinion, it's more important to select a breeder than a puppy. If you are getting a puppy from a good breeder, ALL of the puppies have the same planning, care, nutrition, socializing etc as their next champion show dog. Generally speaking, the "worst" puppy from such a litter is a much better bet than the "best" puppy bred by a poor breeder.

It may sound like we're harping on this, but some of us have been around the breed for a long time - long enough to see LOTS of puppy buyers whose sole criteria were things like "cute puppies", "nice people", "close" and "cheap" - and to see them regret it later. Those of us who are involved in rescue see the results all the time. I've counselled lots of people who obtained their Basset from a dubious source, and now that they're having difficulties the breeder is nowhere to be seen. I would like to see your "basset experience" be a positive one - with a healthy puppy that looks and acts like a Basset should, from a breeder that cares and who will be more than happy to provide support and advice when you need it.

Another point to ponder: I'm assuming that because you specifically want a Basset Hound, there are traits of appearance and personality that you find attractive. If you want those traits, you want to go to someone who is specifically breeding for them, not someone who is simply putting two dogs together because they happen to be of the same breed. If you don't care about the things that make a Basset Hound special, then you might as well simply adopt a nice mixed breed or rescue dog. At least with a rescue dog/puppy you will get a dog that has been evaluated, brought up to snuff medically, and you have the resources of the rescue to help you should you need it.
 

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After finding the breeder's ad on breeders.net:
Breeders.NET

....I'm not getting warm fuzzies about these guys.
Another red flag is that they appear to be breeding multiple breeds. Their primary breed seems to be Mastiffs, plus they have Miniature Dachshunds and Chihuahuas. While it is possible for a good breeder to have more than one breed, four is pushing it, especially when the breeds are so different.

Other issues: CKC registration is generally considered to be worthless. The Continental Kennel Club (not Canadian Kennel Club), will register a Guinea Pig as a Yorkie if you can get someone you know to sign a piece of paper saying that's what it is. Good breeders don't use it.

Finally, a one year health guarantee is pretty much worthless, since most major issues won't appear until the dog is at least two. And I'm willing to bet that you would have to return the puppy to collect on the "guarantee" (I recommend checking that out), which of course you won't do because by the time a problem is apparent you will love the puppy too much to send it back.
 
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