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Look at the picture what would be the knee area see the bowing? I will tell you many years ago when I didn't know any better I had bought from a nice breeder think it was $100.00 back then. Well he had severe joint issues and his bones grew too fast for the cartilage to keep up. I will tell you right now you will spend a h*** of a lot more in vet bills then you would spend going to a reputable breeder and getting a quality basset. The way our house was set up it was steps everywhere, and by the time he was 4 he started struggling on steps, it got worse over that year and he started falling down the steps. We tried blocking him off he howled for hours especially when we went to bed. We tried selling our house no go, so we were forced to surrender him to a rescue and it was horrible. I did it for his own good, helped pick the new owner and kept in touch with her until he passed years later. I would have much rather spent 500- 1000 for one then go through that again. I now have a rescued 4 year old who suffered from severe abuse and a 10 month old puppy, I paid triple the price you are looking at and I did in fact drive 10 hours to get mine (the breeder knocked 250 off his price because we were driving so far to get her, he was getting ready to have heart surgery and had 2 to sell and wanted them gone before his surgery) I did it to find a Euro blood line though I wanted a certain look and she is indeed a gorgeous girl.

Ten hours are you sure? Where do you live and where are you looking for breeders at? I would seriously recommend you wait a few months and save up the money as opposed of buying from a "nice" breeder who doesn't know what they are doing. You really should take the advice already given to you, instead of asking for more opinions, these people are long time dog owners and know what they are talking about.

 

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I will tell you right now the hard to train is a myth, I adopted a rescue last year almost 20 months ago she was 3 when I got her and so severely abused the horror stories I could tell you. It has taken extensive training to overcome the fears she had from the trauma she suffered, but all the basics she got right away and she had been an outside dog.

As for puppy training it all depends on you, set your puppy up to succeed and you will be successful set the pup up to fail and you will say pup is hard to train. We brought Bella home at 9 weeks potty training took me about 3 but she only had 3 accidents, why because I didn't set her up to fail. We kept our eyes glued to her, kept her blocked off in the living room with us at all times, knew to take her out after feedings 10-15 min after a drink, when she woke up, when she was done playing. When I was busy and couldn't keep my eyes on her she was either on a leash attached to my waist or in her crate for a nap. I slept on the couch the first 2 months she was here, my son and hubby took their turns when they were off and we let her out at night when she needed it. Puppies generally can hold 1 hour for each month of age at night, which I think is a little longer then that actually on an 8 hour night she would wake us twice, but all puppies vary. Puppies don't like to potty where they sleep but will if they have no choice from not being let out. If you work you better plan on coming and letting the puppy out a couple times a day or have someone who can let puppers out, or that will set you up to fail almost immediately if you fail to come home during the day to let them out to potty, and come home to a messed in crate. Not to mention the feedings when they are young, hopefully you have considered all of this and made arrangements of some kind?

It is not that the puppies don't need a good home no one is disputing that, you came here and asked our opinions based on the pictures you provided, and we all explained why if you are opting to go the puppy route what you need to look out for. Have you considered an older dog or a puppy from rescue, the rescues have all ages, and work with other rescue groups and could be a tremendous help to you. They are fostered so the foster mom or dad can tell you all about the dog to find you the perfect fit. Being new to the breed maybe that is a better option (they have puppies too, since your wanting to give a puppy a new home) or a young dog 1 year and up? The only reason I went with a puppy the second time around is Lolly was not accepting of adult dogs coming into her home and loved the puppies begging for our neighbors puppy.

You must also understand how many of us have had people come into our lives doing this very thing and then the dog ends up at a rescue or becomes too expensive with health costs for the owner to keep it.

When talking to the breeders ask them about retired dogs, a lot of breeders reputable breeders do a couple of things, keep a puppy they think has potential and the puppy is great but not quality to show so they part with it at an older age. Or they have a breeding stock that they have a few litters and retire to a forever home. Both of those are wonderful situations to be in.

Bo
 

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Not annoying at all, I think we were taken aback a little when you asked for advice then wanted to kind of argue with us, when we actually had your best interest at heart. Especially a first time basset owner. There is no such thing as too curious that is how you learn, and if it's in anyone's power to help then we will. I actually belong to another forum but it's invite only by personal recommendation, and it has a much larger membership. (I think) but several of us belong to both. Glad you made the decision to wait I really think you will be happier in the long run. Good Luck, and don't despair if you don't hear back right away, ask for phone numbers and call them.

Bo =o)
 
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