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Layla woke me up at around 1 am hacking and coughing, pacing around the house trying to eat whatever rubbish she could find on the floor. She was drooling excessively and wouldn't settle down. Her stomach seemed a bit firmer than usual and we couldn't figure out if she nabbed something off the table or ate too much chewbone or what, so off to the emergency vet we went. A couple hundred bucks and a few hours later, the vet couldn't tell if there was anything in her stomach except lots of dog kibble. We opted to watch her ourselves instead of going for a barium study. She came home and slept off the anasthesia, and woke up this morning seeming much better. She also managed to poop, drink and eat without any problems, so things seem to be moving normally. Moral of the story? I'll gripe about it, but lost sleep and money is worth peace of mind.
 

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Poor Layla! Some of her symptoms sound very much like bloat... when dogs become very agitated, can't settle... they pace around the room and bring up a lot of drool/foamy liquid. The stomach goes quite tight like a drum and sounds hollow if tapped. It can't be what Layla had or the vet would have known and carried out an emergency operation because their blood supply can get cut off where the stomach torsions/twists.

I was told many years ago to be careful not to feed my hounds for at least an hour or more after exercising and not to exercise them for an hour or two after feeding as it can cause bloat (more common in long dogs or deep chested dogs) and I once met an elderly Basset owner who had no idea about bloat until she lost a Basset with it and she said she always walked him straight after feeding him, which is not the thing to do!

I hope Layla is OK now.
 

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Yeah she is fine now. Bloat was the first thing on my mind but the vet said she saw no evidence of it at all, otherwise I wouldn't have brought her home. She thought there might have been something in the pyloric region of the stomach blocking digestion but couldn't tell from the x-rays. I checked the house for all rawhide/chewbones that we had given them thinking she may have swallowed the knuckle end of a rawhide but everything was where it should have been. She's fine now, so I'm not sure what it was.
 

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Yeah she is fine now. Bloat was the first thing on my mind but the vet said she saw no evidence of it at all, otherwise I wouldn't have brought her home. She thought there might have been something in the pyloric region of the stomach blocking digestion but couldn't tell from the x-rays. I checked the house for all rawhide/chewbones that we had given them thinking she may have swallowed the knuckle end of a rawhide but everything was where it should have been. She's fine now, so I'm not sure what it was.
We had mysterious issues with our previous basset we think were because of pig ears.. So we don't give our two current bassets any raw hide or pig ears. try not to give them anything they can half chew and swallow that might be hard to digest.
 

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Wow what a scary night... yeah I agree sounds almost like bloat to me too. Glad to hear she's on the mend and doing fine now.
 

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Layla is our little piglet. She will eat her kibble and then Rosco's as well if he doesn't eat his own. I wonder if she was underfed before we adopted her. The other night she had eaten Rosco's food without us realizing it until the end, so she had about 4 cups of food in her belly. I think she just overate.
 

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Ah... yeah that would do it. You may want to separate them when feeding them in the future as you can see she's a gulper already and you don't want her to end up bloating on you. It's definately a scary thing.

Have you tried feeding her twice or three times a day? That can also lessen the chance of bloat. We feed ours in the morning and in the evening since my inlaws lost one of their girls to bloat many years ago. It was a sad day and she was a wonderful basset... definately a tough loss and a lessen learned the hard way.
 

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Our older resecue basset Chuck had an incident of bloat on April 1. He was throwing up piles of foam about 2 hours after dinner, and his stomach was very inflated. We watched him throw up and pace round the room for about 20 min and took him to the emergency vet, as that was on a Sunday evening. The vet took the first set of x-ray, and told us that she didn't see any sign of bloat. They passed a tube down Chuck's throat and was able to retrive a small amount of food, and they also relieved the gas in his stomach. We left the hospital at 10pm, and Chuck had to stay behind for furthur observation, as they could not determine the cause of his symptoms. At 1 am, the vet called us and let us know that they had to relief the gas two more times since we left, and they suggested surgery to explore what's going on in this stomach. The surgery revealed that Chuck indeed did have bloat. His stomach was twisted in the opposite direction that they would normally see, which was why the x-ray did not show the torsion.

We have always feed our two basset boys twice a day with one of food each time. The vet suggested that too much water consumption right after meal could be a cause that. Since then, we have stopped giving them water one hour before and after the meal. We also would not let me play for at least an hour after chow time.

Bloat was very scary. Chuck has been a verterian of surgeries, however, this is the worst he's suffered. It took him a full week to recover from the surgery.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah we are usually pretty good about watching the two of them when we feed them, this was just one of those ocassions where it slipped by us. We feed them half a 13 oz can of moist food in the morning each and then around 1 1/2-2 cups of dry food in the evening. Water is available pretty much all day for them, but Layla sucks it down when she goes for a drink (she almost goes swimming - shoves her nose in nearly up to her eyes to drink and then lets most of it come pouring back out when she's done). I haven't ever monitored their activity level after a meal but am thinking about crating them for an hour after each meal to lessen the chances of bloating. Any other suggestions?
 

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We currently have two dogs that have experienced bloat problems. Yogi had an overnight stay at the emergency vet where they passed a tube to help relieve the gas. Fortunately his stomach did not twist.
Gunny, our GSD, has also had problems with two visits to the emergency vet but did not require an overnight stay.
What we do is not let them have water for one hour after dinner, we feed them smaller meals (three times a day feedings) and we don't allow them to have heavy exercise for 1 hour before or after dinner.
My personal feeling is that you can TRY to take all the precautions and know what's normal for your dog BUT I do believe it is largely a genetic issue and that stress aggravates it.
It is such a scary thing and when Yogi had it, I knew something was very wrong. He was eating grass like crazy, drooling and pacing. Also, he was doing this licking the air, gulping thing. His stomach did not look very distended and the vet wasn't convinced that he was having such a big problem until she saw the xray. His stomach was really bloated! I am so glad that we decided to have them do the xray because I knew he was in distress. They immediately said he would have to stay overnight.
We also keep Mylanta on hand at all times. We give Yogi and Gunny both a tablespoon as soon as we notice something is wrong.
 

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Yikes! We've experienced the *exact* same thing, and it's sooooo scary because your baby looks at you with those precious moment eyes expecting you to make things better, but you can't! On one occassion my husband came home from work to find Bo waddling around the living room, whimpering, salivating, and overall acting very pathetic. Ed couldn't figure out what was wrong with poor Bo, so he rushed him to our vet before they closed. She said it wasn't bloat, and did some bloodwork to rule out some other things. In the end, she kept him overnight to run an IV because he was apparently dehydrated, and by the next morning he was just fine and has never had any problems since. Several years after Bo's ordeal, Daisy had a similar one. Daisy started scratching at our bedroom door in the dead of night, crying. I thought maybe she had to go to the bathroom, but she wouldn't even go outside. She just kept rolling over and acting very distressed. We immediately thought she had the dreaded bloat, but then she started - I KID YOU NOT - burping! After about five more minutes of her rolling around on the floor and belching, she got up and acted like she was fine.

I don't think we ever remembered to ask the vet about Daisy's little ordeal. Has anyone else ever had a basset suffer from indigestion or heartburn? Because that's kind of what it seemed like with Daisy. As for Bo, we never did figure out exactly what causes his little trip to the doggie ER.
 
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