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Bruno is going to be 5 mths old at the end of the month and Ive noticed his behavior starting to change...Hes a very affectionate dog and I love that about him but if ANYONE else is home he will not leave me alone. He will follow me everywhere, bathroom, bed, and no matter where I sit and how many times I transplant my butt into a different chair or room he is up my butt. He also doesnt seem to like it if I would sit with someone else, and its even become a pain in the butt at night with David gets home from work. If we let Bruno upstairs to sleep with us, which I do because he barks at every noise and me being home alone with two children find that somewhat comforting, when David comes to bed Bruno MUST be in the middle of us on my pillow and that wont change. If Dave tries to move to snuggle with me he better forget it cuz Bruno is weaseling his way into the middle...I was wondering if any other women out there had the same type of issue with their dog. I dont know if its a bad issue yet because Brunos not aggressive about it he just throws his weight around to his advantage and is so stubborn that we eventually just give into him. I hope this is just good ole basset quirkyness....
 

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This 'quirk' could get out of hand. YOU are boss, not Bruno, but you're letting him think he rules. You should stop letting him on your bed. Move his crate/bed into your room and let him sleep there. That's his place, your place is your bed. If he cries or barks, eventually he'll stop. At this stage of the game, I expect he will make some noise.....
 

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My Emma is like that sort of with me...but obviously, she's a girl :rolleyes: But if my hubby comes and kisses me while Emma is on my lap...she pushes her nose up to both of our faces while we're kissing and licks and licks and licks...it's very cute. We do it on purpose just to get a reaction from her :p

She's very jealous though....if he is sitting by me on the couch, she'll sit right in front of us on the floor staring at him like she's saying ummm...yeah...I'm supposed to be sitting there. It's funny.
 

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This 'quirk' could get out of hand. YOU are boss, not Bruno, but you're letting him think he rules. You should stop letting him on your bed. Move his crate/bed into your room and let him sleep there. That's his place, your place is your bed. If he cries or barks, eventually he'll stop. At this stage of the game, I expect he will make some noise.....[/b]
I have to agree with Aruuuu. It may seem flattering and cute now, but it could escalate into aggressive guarding behavior. Best to nip it in the bud.
 

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I really don't think you should encourage him. It may be cute now, but when he's all grown up and 40-50 pounds, you may not like him in your bed and it may be too late to change him. He may even get mean over it :angry: . I would nip it now, before he gets much older. Don't let him take over your house.
 

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"I have to agree with Aruuuu. It may seem flattering and cute now, but it could escalate into aggressive guarding behavior. Best to nip it in the bud. "


huh? and your straight a student could grow up to be a serial killer.


People completely misunderstand dog heirarchy ( and there is considerable debate that it even exists)

1./ there has never been any document existence that a dog or group of dogs consider humans as dogs or part of the pack. Were different species for crying out loud. For that matter there is non evidence for interspecies hieracrhies for that matter.

2. Dogs are not capable of abstract thought. They do not conciously seek higher status. There status is what there status is.

3> So called status Dominance reduction exercise (feed the dog last, no dogs on bed or furniture, human first thiugh dooeway etc.) have not proven to reduce aggression. see Debunking the Dominance Myth

4. Dog do what works for them. He follows you around "he is up my butt" because it gets him the attention he wants. It is an unconciously rewarded behavior same as being push, rude and obnoxious. The more your reward a behavior the more you get. If you like the behavior the nothing is wrong. If you find the behavior rudxe and obnoxious stop rewarding it.

You Get What You Reinforce, Not What You (Necessarily) Want

Competing Reinforcers

Rewarding Non-Behavior

not because the dog "may become aggressive" but because the behavior is rude and obnoxious
 

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Mikey, you are so right. I have to confess to having spoiled Francis a lot and now after 8 years he has a lot of behaviors that I wish I had not allowed but it's been going on so long I just live with it. He hogs the bed and the couch and I have to fight for my space. It was cute when he was a pup but now it's a bit of a problem. I'm single and it's been just Francis and I for the last 8 years and he's pretty possessive.
Francis is blind now but when he could see he used to get agitated when anyone got too close to me. He never got violent or vicious but he WHINED, Lord how he whined!
 

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I spoiled Maggie Mae (ATB) terribly when she was a puppy. I gave into her every wish. When she got older, she became very hard to deal with at times. I do regret some of the behaviors I let her get away with. When I got Rusty & Stickers I vowed not to repeat those same mistakes. One year later, I'm happy to say I haven't. I love them to death, but they have rules. They are such a pleasure to live with because of the rules I've set up. They know what's expected of them and they do it. I hope to have them around for many years like I did my precious MM, so it just makes it easier on all of us if right from the start them know the drill! Rusty is especially attached to me. He follows me everywhere I let him. I want him to enjoy being with me but not "need" to be with me. I don't feed into this behavior. His adorble face is very hard to resist and wears most people down. But I know if I let me be a Mommy's boy, he's just become like velcro. Stickers is more independent. She is the one that he follows most of the time. She doesn't seem to mind and they seem to have their relationship figured out. I'm so glad I have both of them to keep each other busy!!!!
 

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My little Dixie is like a piece of velcro! She is all over me, since they day she came to live with us. Since she was a rescue/foster, I allowed it. I still do. However, she is not on the furniture or the bed. I've stuck to the House Rules that we had established with Belvedere from day one. Dixie was not pleased and she'll still puts her paws on the sofa or the side of the bed, just hoping. I don't give in.

As far as dogs seeking higher status ...I've been dealing with unique situation with Dixie and Belly. She has absolutely and completely dominated him at every opportunity. I'm calling this dominance because I don't know another word to use. She must be in front ...must be first ...must be closer to me. When he's getting lovies and attention, she will charge in and literally put herself in between Belly and I. I discourage this and I'll reach right over her and finish petting Belly, as she whines and pushes against me. I will not give in to this but Belly does ...he just backs up and let's her have the space.

When we walk the dogs, they are on separate leashes, Belly with my husband and Dixie with me. It's all good as long as we stay a few steps ahead of Steve and Belvedere. If they get ahead, she'll race to get in front of them ...and then she'll relax and sniff around without pulling. All the while, watching to make sure she is in front.

What is this behavior called? It's not aggressive ...she's not agressive. I was told by her foster mom that she is "pleasantly assertive" and that's a good way to describe her. And I can certainly say that Belvedere is pleasantly submissive to her. I have decided it is what it is. She will not have highter status over me but it seems to work for her with other dogs.

Opinions and ideas are welcome.
 

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My 2 are like this to a point. If Bryan and I are snuggling they try to get in between us, but we ignore them. They are both jealous of each other (they are both rescues so I chalk it up to that), but we just give them equal attention and move on. We have rules about the furniture that we hold fast to. They are allowed in bed every once in a while (like when one of us is home alone), but Gibbs could care less. Lily is also assertive towards Gibbs (she was here first)-she is not mean about it though. He usually gives in, but every once in a while he lets her know that she's annoyed him.

~Heather
 

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"I have to agree with Aruuuu. It may seem flattering and cute now, but it could escalate into aggressive guarding behavior. Best to nip it in the bud. "
huh?[/b]
Mike, are you honestly saying that you don't see a connection between a dog who's been allowed to take over a household and aggression? I think what a dog claims, he'll guard. If he's allowed to claim the couch, or a bed, or a person, he'll want to guard that object or person.Maybe not every dog will guard to the point of biting, but some will- why allow a potential problem to develop?

I'm always open to new information, that's why I joined this board, but I don't see where I'm off-base here-
 

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Mike, are you honestly saying that you don't see a connection between a dog who's been allowed to take over a household and aggression? I think what a dog claims, he'll guard. If he's allowed to claim the couch, or a bed, or a person, he'll want to guard that object or person.Maybe not every dog will guard to the point of biting, but some will- why allow a potential problem to develop?

I'm always open to new information, that's why I joined this board, but I don't see where I'm off-base here-[/b]


What is the most acurate predictor of future behavior? That would be current behavior. We would expect a dog that guards food would also guard a bone he has never seen before. If a dog has never show any inclination to resourse guard why should we think it will in the future. It is highly unlikely unless something unfornseen happens.

How can someone "allowed" an her to claim anything. One either on actively sets out to claim in the first place or the other allows volunitarily access. Does a dog claim it food bowl because it eats out of it every day. Access to a resource is not an accurate predictor of where it will resource guard. Of course no access to a resource will prevent the oportunity to guard but a dog without access to any resources will not be alive very long.

Book Review - Mine! by Jean Donaldson
Donaldson presents resource guarding as a normal, adaptive behavior and rejects notions that resource guarders are not "nice" dogs or are "dominant aggressive".

...Donaldson describes ritualized aggression in general, as well as various, specific forms of resource guarding. She notes that, "the most common constellation will involve guarding more than one kind of resource and being uncomfortable about certain kinds of body handling." [/b]
The notion of push, rude dominate behavior is related to resource guarding is rejected. Also resource guarderer then to be um resources guarder, garding more than one resource and being unconfortable with body handling. I don't recall any mention of body handling issue.

to prevent the dog from guarding the bed they should not be allowed on it? to prevent the dog from guarding the the couch the should not be on it? Whats next, to prevent the dog from guarding mom it is mot allowed on moms lap? To prevent the dog from guarding its food bowl it is not fed? Restriction or access to a resource is not the cause of resource guarding

So called dominance reduction exercises like feed the dog last, dog not allowed on bed - furniture, human first through the doors have never been shown in any scientific studies to reduce aggression. There may be valid reason to implement one/more/all of the exercised aggression is not one. Because a dog is push, rude or unruly does not make it more prone to aggression. Heck the most common and dangerious dogs are fear biters. They are not pushy dogs just the opposite.

There has been the over tone that the behavior the dog presents is some how motivated at least in part by jeliousy. This jelious we will later become motivation to guard. Why Can't a Dog Be More Like a Dog?
Unfortunately, human nature being what it is, when the dog-owner relationship starts to go awry, the owner's anthropomorphism tends to assume a nasty negative hue and now bad human characteristics are attributed to dogs, in fact particularly pernicious human characteristics. Dogs are frequently accused of being spiteful, vindictive and vicious. Rather than even considering our 'poor learner' might actually have a poor trainer who never effectively taught the dog what was expected, most owners insist the dog misbehaved on purpose. In fact, Jane thought Moose urinated in the house because he was jealous of her time spent with another dog, so Moose was confined to the kitchen, whereupon he exacted his revenge and chewed the kitchen chair legs So Moose was isolated to the great outdoors, where he vindictively ctively dug up her flowers and barked out of spite.

Assuming dogs have an human appetite for spite and revenge is a convenient excuse for the dog's obvious lack of elementary education. A flagrant advertisement that the owner neglected to teach the dog where to eliminate, what to chew, where to dig, when and for how long to bark, and when and upon whom to jump-up. It is conveniently simpler to blame the dog than train it. Personally I would never insult a dog by even suggesting it has fallen foul of these especially execrable and exclusively human foibles - spite, revenge and viciousness. Whoa! So, a lot of you disagree. But of course we disagree - this is a moot point: None of us will ever know for certain what a dog is thinking, what are its motives, or why it does what it does. What we do know however, is what the dog did. And if for example the dog soiled the house, let's just housetrain the dog and then the owner will no longer be annoyed, the dog will no longer be punished but instead, it can be happily reintegrated into household living and therefore, will no longer be chewing, digging and barking whilst in solitary confinement in the garden. (Or, if you prefer your interpretation, the dog will no longer have any reason to exact revenge.) And once owner and newly-housetrained dog are living in harmony, then, and only then, would it be profitable to engage in moot debate of the differential etiology of housesoiling. Even so, it is still unlikely we'll reach agreement. Luckily though, this is not important because few owners are interested in the etiology of problems which no longer exist.[/b]
There is no indications that dogs are capable of the higher level abstract thinking and emotions of humans. As state above assuming that they do exist is often a convienent excuse for not being able to correct a problem or even creating it in the first place. When the dog "bulls" its way between Mom and dad on the couch, why assume the dog is Jelous of the attention dad is getting from "his female". There is a simplier and easier explaination. In repeated similar situation the dog has been rewarded for such behavior. Dog bulls its way in. Ma first pets then pushes the dog away. Dog persists and the same thing happens again. Eventually Ma gives up and the dog is firmly wedged between Mom and Dad getting attention from both. Hmmm is the dog Jelous of Dad or has it rightly learned those are percisely the right moment to get some attention it has been seeking all day? Dogs do what works, it is that simple. It is us humans that tend to make train issues more complicated than they really are.

You Get What You Reinforce, Not What You (Necessarily) Want
Please allow me to say that you have made a profound observation, one that many trainers don't see well, or admit to, even when it is pointed out - it is what the animal is perceiving that counts, not what we perceive or think that the animal should be perceiving.[/b]
 

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If a dog has never show any inclination to resourse guard why should we think it will in the future. It is highly unlikely unless something unfornseen happens.[/b]
That "something unforeseen" generally involves competition for valued resources. Competition can arise when a new dog is introduced into the household, or when a child or spouse attempts to lay claim to something the dog has not previously had to compete for, such as a valued seat on the sofa. Neither of these scenarios is all that unlikely. Just because a dog hasn't displayed guarding behavior in the past doesn't mean he has lost the instinct for it. Experienced dog owners keep one eye open to situations where guarding might show itself.
 
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