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Some Bassets have any number of odd ribs but typically a 'flanged rib' is where instead of the ribcage being smooth right through to underneath, with the actual ribcage extending well back to support the long body (the norm should be to be able to put just 4 fingers between the end of the ribcage and where the pelvic structure begins - the loin), the hound's ribs kind of turn out at the bottom. Sometimes the ribcage doesn't extent far enough back (there are some good examples of this pictured on this thread!), so leaving a big gap. You should be able to put your hands on the ribcage without feeling any odd lumps and bumps in the ribbing. Good ribcages have to be bred for. And yes, it can appear that the situation improves with age, but this has more to do with general muscling and bodying up than an actual improvement in the shape of the ribcage.

From the UK Breed Standard "Body ........ Ribs well rounded and sprung, without flange, extending well back......."

Also this from The Basset Hound Illustrated Standard, Pub. the BHCA (highly recommended :)) "The rib structure is long, smooth and extends well back. The ribs are well sprung, allowing adequate room for heart and lungs. Flatsidedness and flanged ribs are faults". "Due to his length of body it is particularly important that the Basset has a good level topline. This strength comes from the length of rib, not the loin. The loin is the only area of the back that does not receive structural support. A soft topline results from weakened back muscles or too long a loin"
 

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I have a mini dachshund that had flanged ribs as a puppy. It wasn't until he was nearly two years old that his ribs had corrected themselves. I believe leaving him intact throughout that time is what caused the healthy bone growth since hormones play a vital role in bone formation. Either way, I'm glad the issue resolved itself.
 
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