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Hello. I recently adopted a 3 month old Bassett puppy named Daisy. Boy is it different. She is very intelligent but stubborn is an understatement. Potty training I sdcc not going well. I hav ed followed instructions. Take her to same spot on a schedule. Got training treats. Catch her in the act. She just seems to do what she wants. She will actually pretend to potty to get treats. She will assume the position, squat for a few seconds. and then look to me for her treat even when she has not actually gone to the bathroom. She hates the crate. Will cry incessantly. Any help appreciated. I think the prior owner may have spoiled her or left her alone too much.
 

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sounds like a typical 12 week old.
Yep, pretty much does. Bassets have the reputation of being stubborn but as you are learning, they are usually intelligent too so you may get a better result if you change your approach and succeed in making her think what you want, was her idea all along.

I don't know about going to the same spoit - dogs don't alwayjs empty in the same spot. As always with rescues (if she was - came from another home?), there is always 'baggage' - things they have got away with before that you have to 'untrain' and then train according to what you want. She may have this hatred of crates because she was in one for way too long before! Sad,

All I can offer is loads of praise when you take her out - when you know she probably needs to empty. Correct ONLY in the act - if she doesn't do what you know she must need to within 5 mins of being TAKEN outside, bring her back in but don't allow her the run of the house. Keep her in the room by the outside door, and stay with her. The moment she attempts to squat (hard with a low to ground Basset), say NO! and take her back outside. Clean up the mistakes properly without comment. She will be watching and as dogs normally (there are exceptions) want a happy owner, she may get the message.
 

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I think you'd better take her for a walk right after she eats, and when she's done, give her praise. Make sure that she only goes to the sdcc outside. You will develop a reflex and a habit.
 

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I think you'd better take her for a walk right after she eats, and when she's done, give her praise. Make sure that she only goes to the sdcc outside. You will develop a reflex and a habit.
Not a 'walk' per se as this is a breed prone to Bloat ( often with torsion). But take her outside to empty for sure. Just not an organised walk - best practice is not to walk as in exercise, for 2 hours after a meal.
 

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"best practice is not to walk as in exercise, for 2 hours after a meal. "

just like don't swim for an hour after eating, old wives tale that has no scientific merit and all studies prove no corrolation , not that there are many nor are they extensive.

"
Several popular theories regarding bloat were not substantiated during the
study. There was no correlation of bloat risk to exercise before or after
eating, as most dogs bloated in the middle of the night with an empty,
gas-filled stomach. There was also no correlation to vaccinations, to the
brand of dog food consumed, or to the timing or volume of water intake
before or after eating.
"

These measures, long been thought to reduce the risk of bloat, were found to have no effect:

Restricting exercise before or after eating
Restricting water intake before and/or after meals
Feeding two or more meals per day
Moistening dry kibble before feeding
 

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Well I had a male who blew first thing, found in his crate surrounded by white froth before he'd been out, or eaten anything since his second meal the day before. However of our 4 cases, he was the only one to blow overnight.

That being said, does it really hurt to be cautious re exercise and feeding and all the other things that some research seems to rule out making any difference??? The reasons for GDV (bloat with torsion) are always changing as there is more research done. I happen to think prevention is always better than cure - and there is 'evidence' to suggest an hereditary involvement with this condition. Which is more likely to have been the case with mine. But it never hurts, to take everything possible to prevent this sometimes fatal condition, from happening.
 

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"That being said, does it really hurt to be cautious re exercise and feeding and all the other things that some research seems to rule out making any difference??? "


yes it can. ie Performance in hunting and other endurance sports say feeding inmediately after the best time to replensh glycogen supplies and feeding one meal is superior to multiple meals. When it comes to bloat the size of the meal does seem to have relavence so feen nutritional dense food at a smaller quanity is superior to feediing more less nutrionally dense food. hence why people thing splitting meals is better but it is not the number of meal but the size.


Also when it come to exiercise, exercise right after eating is better than the no exercise alternative. Following such guidlines can do harm because the tendency is to eliminate what otherwise would be overall more healthy for the dog.

Overwight dogs are less likely to bloat than lean dogs does not mean you you should overfeed your dog to prevent bloat, same goes for some/most of these guideline they impair the ability to do what is healthy for the dog.
 

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I'm really sorry Mikey, but advice to the novice is what I've given. Based on YEARS with the breed, and with what research into GDV Bloat in Bloodhounds was done by Liverpool Uni. I was in contact with them at the time which was some time ago now.

Again I'd never 'exercise' as in running for an extended period, immediately AFTER a meal. The digestive system needs to be able to work on food eaten. I would feed smaller mealS in a 24 hour period.

And what you have to say here doesn't involve the known hereditary involvement within Bloodhounds - AND Bassets. From my own observations and personal experience, bloat does run in some bloodlines more than others.
 

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I just want to add that I adopted a Basset mix about 5 years ago when she was 4! Yes, she is stubborn. I have to say that she can do the silliest things no matter how naughty and you can’t help but laugh. She has been trying to dig a hole in the shower floor for quite some time!
 
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