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Hi Guys

This is my first post on here. We have finally decided take the plunge and are getting an 18 month old Basset Hound on the 14th August.

I can't wait!!!

Just wanted some advice on what size crate we would need. Would a 36" crate be big enough for him?

His breeder has advised that it will be easier for us to house train him using a crate, since he's been used to living outside in kennels with the other hounds.

Any help much appreciated!
 

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I think house training is easier with the use of a crate. I also think my sanity is saved because my two are also crate trained. They are put up at night to sleep and when I'm going to be gone for long hours. I would hate to come home to a mess.

As to how long it needs to be...I would say, if you can, look at the parents to kind of guesstimate how long your pup will be. If you're only going to use the crate until he's house trained then I think 36" should be plenty long. If it's too big you can always stack boxes in the back to make it smaller. The key to using a crate to house train is to only give the puppy enough room to lay down and turn around. Otherwise they'll use the bathroom in one corner and just sleep in the other and they won't learn anything. But if you're going to move on to crate training him, then you need to be prepared to buy a longer crate if necessary. Good luck with everything!
 

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I just got a 36" crate for Boomer, and it seems to be the perfect size.
 

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Simone weighs about 50 pounds. Her crate is 36" long x 24" wide and 27" tall. She has plenty of room to get in turn around and stretch out. Simone wasn't crazy about being crated when we adopted her from rescue but now runs into it when I open the Pedigree Dentastix bag. When we get home, she's happy to us and we're happy to see her because there is no mess or destruction in the house.
 

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It depends on how they prefer to sleep, those that curl up 35 is fine for those that like to streach out 42" is better
 

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If the dog is not use to crate confinement A crat is not usually something they take to right away. Instead of just shoving the dog into the crate and hope the get use to it , which rare happens by the way, it is best to aclimate the dog to the crate in porogressive and slow steps making it the best place in the worlds to be .

crate training
 

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why is the breeder getting rid of an 18 month old doggy? was he a stud, any why outside all the time? poor baby!
Possibly either they ran him on thinking he might have potential as a show dog, or maybe the right home didn't come along until now.

I had one boy that was 5 before I found just the right home for him.

If they're raised in the kennel with the other dogs, they don't feel deprived. (Mine live in the house, though...)
 

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FWIW most breeder of dogs for hunting purposes raise the dog in kennel outside because they believe it is more humane, that is by having the dog acilimate to weather the are able to perform in weather, be it hot, cold, rain etc. taking a dog not aclimated to higher temps to work is much more likely to induce heat stroke than in a dog aclimated to the heat in the first place.

It is best to reserve judgement unless al the facts are known A dog crated alone inside a house is a lot more diprived than a dog living in a kennelk with other dogs even if it is outside.
 

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why is the breeder getting rid of an 18 month old doggy? was he a stud, any why outside all the time? poor baby!
i was the same age when my peeps got me from my breeder.
i think it just works out like that sometimes.
some folks thought I wasn't up to standard b/c of my smaller size.
that mighta' had something to do with it.
my folks don't care a bit cuz I'm so danged CUTE:cool:
 

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i wasn't up to standard because of my smaller size either. --Worm

and yes, i loooooove my crate and get sad when the door gets accidentally closed and i can't get in it. well, not that i want to be in my crate all the time. i don't and sometimes i whine to get out if i've been in there too long (like this weekend....)
 

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Thanks for everyones replies.

The breeder is letting him go, as we approached him with a view to getting a younger dog rather than a puppy (he did also have some puppies available which we saw). He had originally kept him as he had show potential, however once his adult teeth came through they did not meet the show standard (they don't overbite - I think??). He is currently kept in stables with the other bassets, and they all have access to a large grassed field. (The breeder is a well known basset breeder in the UK, and has had past crufts champions in the mid 1990's - we've done our research and they are reputable)

As we are not picking him up until the 14th August, the breeder is going to spend some time with him getting used to a crate, and also spend some time doing some lead work with him aswell.

Any advice on if to go the collar/lead route or harness route also appreciated. I've been looking at the martingale type collars, as have been advised that these are good for bassets - any opinions?
 

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Any advice on if to go the collar/lead route or harness route also appreciated. I've been looking at the martingale type collars, as have been advised that these are good for bassets - any opinions?
it is a matter of personal prefference, how the dolg walks on lead, and the train and training methods used to teach loose leash walking.

Personally I not a big fan of either any slip type collar whether limited like a prong or martingale or a unlimited like a choke chain. Any dog that pulls on a lead while walking and is attached by a collar even a flat buckle one is very likely to do cervical vertibrea damage. So a harness is safer in that regard. However if you have a dog which tends to pull a traditional harbess with a strap across the sturnum actual causes then to pull hardere against the restraint. Hence for puller I prefer a Sporn no pull halter or similar harness with straps the go under the arm pits. IMHO Basset are more sensitivce in this area than the neck which some seem to be immune for pain unless the training collar is worn very high up near the ears and is impossible to keep in that position given the shape of the typical basset neck. However the Sporn harness is not the be all end all for all dogs. For sensitive dogs the typical basset reaction to stress. and pain under the arm pits cause when the dog pull certain constitutes stress. is stop completely and refuse to move. ie flat basxet. there have been a few people that have experience a basset that simply refuse to move when wearing one So you need to keep an open mind about any training gear choose what you thing will work best for your training methodology and dog but be willing to change it up if it does not work to expectations.


Head halters like a gental leader or halti can be effective with pullers but some dogs react poorly to them and need more prolonged conditioning before they can be worn than other device., they are also dangerious if used on a long lead There is a new front buckle harness/halter first produced Sensi-ble harness. however while the do reduce pulling vs a traditional harness they are not nearly as secure. The is a recommendation for puller to attache the harness to a collar. When that is done you end up with the same potential for injury as with a collar alone.

With a dog that is trained to walk on a loose leash I general use an english training lead which is choke collar and lead all in one. Simply slip it over the dogs head and it on. This eliminates the need for putting on a collar or harness. Or wearing one in the house where accident do occur with dogs getting strangeled or hung up on them. So I prefer that dog be without any collars or harnesses in the house


I have one dogs that reaction to stress when on lead is not simply to stop and not move it is to back up. as such she has proven to be able to escape for martingale, flat buckle collar, and traditional harness. while she can not escape by backing up from a choke chain or lead she can drop her head and back out IMHO when i come to security a properly fitted sporn type harness it har to beat but at the same time there is no restraint that can not be defeated.
 

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You've already been given fantastic advice here, so I just wanted to take a minute and tell you, Welcome! This is an awesome forum with a lot of great advice! :)
 

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i was just curious! thanks! I, obviously, don't know anything about show dogs. I wish I had learned more about lineage and the breed before getting bowser though. I love him to bits, but in the future i hope i get a healthier baby! lol Enjoy your little one!
 
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