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Teddy is a rescue. He has been with us for almost two years now. He is a most Awesome Basset. We think he is probably 4 years old. He has never been fond of fireworks. Thunder is not an issue, only fireworks and gun like noises. This New Years Eve his reaction was as severe as it has ever been in the time he has been with us. We were all in bed by 10:30. At midnight there were prolonged fireworks in the neighborhood. He bolted out of his bed and then he paced the house extremely nervous (panting and shivering) all night long until he wore himself out around 5 am. I stayed up with him all night but could not console him. His PTSD has continued now for 5 nights. He will be resting (snoozing peacefully) on the couch until we go to bed. He will go out for his last potty of the day and then come back to his couch and continue his snooze. As soon as his people make ready for bed the PTSD kicks in (even though there are no fireworks) and he starts his pacing and nervous whining until someone gets up and sits with him. We have been taking turns sleeping on the couch each night to keep him calm. His symptoms are less severe than night one (and I think improving each night) but I would rather not get him use to having us sleep on the living room sofa every night. Any and all advice is welcome.
 

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for noise phobia try melatonin 0r melatonin/cbd oil. Noise-Phobic Dogs - Whole Dog Journal

I personal would not by into the PTSD explanation vs his behavior gets him what he desires which is someone to sleep with,. a compromise can be a bed or crate beside your bed in the bedroom. Most bassets do not like to be isolated even at night while sleeping


 

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Teddy is a rescue. He has been with us for almost two years now. He is a most Awesome Basset. We think he is probably 4 years old. He has never been fond of fireworks. Thunder is not an issue, only fireworks and gun like noises. This New Years Eve his reaction was as severe as it has ever been in the time he has been with us. We were all in bed by 10:30. At midnight there were prolonged fireworks in the neighborhood. He bolted out of his bed and then he paced the house extremely nervous (panting and shivering) all night long until he wore himself out around 5 am. I stayed up with him all night but could not console him. His PTSD has continued now for 5 nights. He will be resting (snoozing peacefully) on the couch until we go to bed. He will go out for his last potty of the day and then come back to his couch and continue his snooze. As soon as his people make ready for bed the PTSD kicks in (even though there are no fireworks) and he starts his pacing and nervous whining until someone gets up and sits with him. We have been taking turns sleeping on the couch each night to keep him calm. His symptoms are less severe than night one (and I think improving each night) but I would rather not get him use to having us sleep on the living room sofa every night. Any and all advice is welcome.
 

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As the owners of 4 bassets, 3 of whom were rescues with different issues, all required some sort of "calming" for them. Car rides-(vomiting, whining for 10 hours, fireworks, thunder. Melatonin never, I repeat, never worked. Benadryl sometimes.) Letting them find a table to hide under was our best bet and our bed was always a refuge for them--wait, what--meaning they usually sleep on our bed anyways. It is learned behavior/fear, but we anticipate thunder and fireworks and try to leave tv or music on, close all the blinds so they can't see lightning, etc.. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As the owners of 4 bassets, 3 of whom were rescues with different issues, all required some sort of "calming" for them. Car rides-(vomiting, whining for 10 hours, fireworks, thunder. Melatonin never, I repeat, never worked. Benadryl sometimes.) Letting them find a table to hide under was our best bet and our bed was always a refuge for them--wait, what--meaning they usually sleep on our bed anyways. It is learned behavior/fear, but we anticipate thunder and fireworks and try to leave tv or music on, close all the blinds so they can't see lightning, etc.. Hope this helps.
Thanks. We have not tried melatonin. The vet gave us a pheromone collar to try. He is suppose to wear it for 3 months. I am not sure it has made a difference yet. Teddy use to feel safe in the our bed. His go to night time sleep choice has always been snuggled up at our feet. Now he does not come near it. This has not been a one night thing. We are now on day twelve. That is why I am calling it PTSD. If he wakes in the night for any reason he starts to panic and does not calm until I get up and sit with him. He will finally settle in his office chair or under the office desk. I think it is very slowly becoming less severe. It breaks my heart that he is so stressed.
 

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I've used Benadryl, as well. It helps to get mine to sleep when they just can't seem to relax. Also, have you tried moving him up near your chest or head area in your bed, between you and your significant other? Mine usually sleep near the foot or our bed, as well, but on "scary" nights, we've had some luck getting them to sleep if we pull them up and kind of squish them between us and pillows. It sounds like Teddy associates the bedroom with the scary noises, so pulling him up closer to you might make him feel safer.

Also, you might try hanging out in the bedroom in the day and evening (not just when you are going to bed). It might help desensitize him to the room/bed if he spends time in there aside from those "terrifying" bedtime hours. Good luck.
 

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As the owners of 4 bassets, 3 of whom were rescues with different issues, all required some sort of "calming" for them. Car rides-(vomiting, whining for 10 hours, fireworks, thunder. Melatonin never, I repeat, never worked. Benadryl sometimes.) Letting them find a table to hide under was our best bet and our bed was always a refuge for them--wait, what--meaning they usually sleep on our bed anyways. It is learned behavior/fear, but we anticipate thunder and fireworks and try to leave tv or music on, close all the blinds so they can't see lightning, etc.. Hope this helps.
My dog and melatonin also helped to recover from illness! Only there you need to observe the dose of admission! And it's better to consult with your veterinarian first!
 
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