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I am quite upset although it may seem rediculous. I had people over tonight and Monty was extremley badly behaved. Whats worse these people are cat people and wonder why you'd want a 'stupid dog'. I feel terrible because it is my fault as an owner for not being able to curb these behaviours and at the end of the day a dog only understands what you teach it. here is an overview of Monty:
He is six months old. He can sit, sit and stay for a treat, walks well on a lead beside me and doesnt pull and will stop imediatley if i say stop and he will sit at the traffic lights.he comes when i call(outside in the park not in the house really). I get him to sit and wait when feeding him until the bowl is on the floor. He isnt a barker, he only barks during play sometimes and in garden while im inside cleaning. He is very freindly to other people and dogs.

His problems are-mouthing, when i go to stroke him he just eats my hand, he has improved, he doesnt bite down but if he catches you the wrong way it hurts!, Jumping up-i have been trying for ages to solve this, when i approach him i say sit with my hand down flat, i dont pet him untl he sits and if he jumps i move away again. Eating out of the cat litter tray, trying to eat off counters/out of the bin. running over the sofa chasing the cat. he is hyper-i want to play with him but he is heavy, he jumps on me and has headbutted my in the face a few times-that hurts!

He gets at least an hour a day of excercise plus playtime. he sees people and other dogs when he is out as i live in a city. Last week he came on holiday with me and a freind-his first holiday and first time on a train-he was brilliant and you'd have thought he was a seasoned traveller!

Tonight was unfortunatley bad. People arrived and he jumped all over them. They tried to stroke him and he just mouthed them, their clothes and tried to eat their feet. he tried to eat food, he jumped all over people and sent a drink flying up my wall. to top it off he went over and pee'd on the carpet while just looking at everyone. These people have never owned a dog and are cat people. One was pushing him away when he was trying to jump up, monty then took this to mean wrestleing and began to mouth and bark. another kept waving their hands at him and he kept trying to catch their finger with his mouth. Another was screaming at him and he got more excited and someone also told him to F-Off. I felt sorry for him because it isnt his fault he doesnt understand and it isnt fair because he misses out then-when he even came near anyone people didnt want him anywhere near them-and he likes people. I felt people were going to really lose it at him because i was putting out food on a low coffee table and he'd eat it so i put him in the garden on his long leash and gave him his dinner. Then no one wanted him back in and i felt so sorry for him. Instead people fussed around my cat never mind that the hair flies out of her and people fed her off their plates!!! I looked outside and was actually heartbroken,there was Monty just sat in the dark and in the rain,silently staring at the back door not even moving with his little sad face waiting on someone to come and get him.Once we finished our food i refused to leave him sat out there for hours. I brouhgt him in and held him by the collor for a while until he calmed a bit. Then i got him a bone i got from the butchers and made him sit and take it gently from me-people were shocked he could do this. He was occupied then and was later ready to sleep.

I felt so awful after. I called him over and he wouldnt come over. Later he lay down beside me but after a minute got up and moved away and curled up on his own. I felt rejected and like id been cruel to him-is it possible for a dog to be annoyed at you like this??? Or is it that basset attitude just-were they can be aloof at times-i find monty is like this if he's interested in something else and i feel rejected sometimes:(

Please help, how do clam him down when people are over. It isnt fair on him, i want to be able to have people over and relax and for Monty to behave enough so that people like him and he can enjoy the attention. I am firm with him, he gets a firm no and a rap on the nose when he does something bad. But he stops and then later will do the same thing again. I understand that if you dont like dogs this would be hard to handle-but i hate the thought of people being nasty to him when really he is a very sweet dog.

I read on another site that someone runs with their 7month old basset pup, i heard it was good for running off their energy because theyre bred to hunt for hours. I was thinking of taking up running-is this a good idea or not because i worry about his bones still developing-mind you i really cannot run very far:p Also, i am going to get him neutered next month so hopefully this should help his hyperactivity.

Can anyone help with the mouthing espcially-i worry someone who doesnt know dogs will think he is biting out of aggression.

Monty is the best decision i made, i live on my own and am unwell and he has really added quality to my life and actually has improved my health. i love his energy even if it is annoying at times and giving him away is simply NOT an option-i hate even typing the idea!

Id really appreciate help, im already feel terrible so please can people be nice and not shout at me.

thank you
 

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If he would be quiet I would probably crate him when you have guests, especially if they are not fond of dogs. Try a kong loaded with filling and that should help keep him happy. If you want to introduce Monty to guests when they come, you could leash lead him around for greetings. He is still a pup :) I love dogs but even I get annoyed if they are behaving badly, and if I am at a party I worry they may get into something they shouldn't, lol
 

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I agree with Kathy on the crate thing, because in reality...you have a house full of guests and can't tend to him. He is young so his behavior doesn't surprise me. And none of it makes you a bad owner. He is a puppy! Puppies mouth and tug and play, you can't and shouldn't want to change that.

If you have a group over again just keep him occupied in his crate, take him out to potty and eat and then if you want to keep him among the group maybe keep his leash attached to you so he can't run off and counter surf and try to play with people who don't want to play.

I am also one of those people who feels bad when my dog can't be involved. I feel like I'm hurting her feelings. But I don't think she ever holds a grudge against me for time not spent with her and I don't think Monty will hold a grudge against you either.
 

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Poor Monty. He's at that same stage Winston is at. Hyper, teething, and still learning manners. Quite frankly, it's no wonder Monty got progressively excited, as the guests' reactions looked like invitations to play from Monty's perspective. You did the right thing as far as giving him a bone from the butcher. I often save special treats for my two when I need them to be quiet. My last dog Zoey was an incessant barker when guests came over. I had my guests throw her ball or play with one of her toys with her. This calmed her a bit and she got her "oh look, it's a new person to play with" excitement out of her system. The mouthing will get better. Monty is getting his big dog teeth and mouthing helps sooth his sore gums. It's also how puppies play. As long as he has good bite inhibition, this is all normal.

Have patience with Monty and ask your guests to do the same. As far as him holding a grudge, well, things happen and dogs are very forgiving. Don't beat yourself up.
 

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Mine is just a bit older than yours, and he is very rambunctious right now. He needs to be "snipped" but the vet wants to wait a few more months to help with his bone development. He started nibbling on my hand a bit hard, and I took my hands and held his mouth closed, stared at him and showed him my teeth. He backed right down.

When I have company, I just fill his treat ball.
 

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Oh so sorry I think we've all had our dogs embarrass us once & awhile. I'd take it as a sign to have more dinner parties with just a few that are definite dog people using the suggestions above. This way he can get used to his party manners with people who will appreciate what he has learned & laugh at his puppy faux pas (err paws). However, no matter how bad Princess Buttercup could behave if anyone ever told her to f-off, I'd have to remind them she lives here & they don't! Grrr... & hang in there.
 

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Monteeee.....!!

well, u r a smart boy! at six months, i didn't know most of the things u know like commands and stuff. i didn't start school until 7 months. and even now, at almost a year, i don't know loose-leash walking, my person says. definitely not like u. all that to say, that it takes some time to work on these things. that u know a lot of the other things is a good sign! u can learn and work for treats, for example!

sorry u had a hard night of partying. i agree w/bassetmom and annie that a crate is very useful, but dunno if u usually use a crate?

when i was 5 months old, we had a holiday party w/30 people. wow! my person kept me in the crate the last hour before the party because they were so busy preparing. then when the guests started coming, they kept me in the crate another 20-30 min, when i couldn't stand it anymore and started whining/barking in my crate. all these people were looking in at me, like i was in a cage at the zoo-- hey, i wanna join the parteee too! let me out!

so they did. my person had to trade off w/my other roommate auntie M. and her Dad. at least one person was watching me the whole time, while another person took care of food, drinks, guests, etc. my grandpoppie took me out to piddle/poo every hour or 2. my bladder was small at the time. all that to say, it would be good to be able to trade of watching Montee when u r hosting a partee. and if u can't, then tie him outside or put into the crate.

i did ok at the partee and i even retired earlie. i slunk into the bedroom climbed up the doggie stairs, laid on the bed and slept. a very astute infectious diseases expert at the party said to my person, "is he sick?" "he seems tired." she was right and couple days later is when they found i was full of worms, worms, worms still. yeck. all that to say perhaps i woulda been a bigger pain at the partee if i wasn't sick w/worms. hence the name. but i digress. sorry it is late.

a coupla ideas fer ya. when i was in puppy school, my teacher addressed jumping on people and what to do. unfortunately, this wasn't one of my main issues, so we didn't pay that much attention. but yeah, methinks it has something to do with ignoring him when he jumps. i'm sure Mikey T can give u more info on that. But then, the key is, that u then practice with a friend of your person's. Like a friend who understands puppies and dogs. Ya gotta practice having them ring the doorbell and coming inside and not jumpin' on them. And practice havin' them play w/u and u not jumpin' on them or being too mouthy. PRACTICE = lotsa treats! yeah, and can also use clicker training to help Montee understand even more clearly what u want him to do and what not to do. Practice one week w/a friend, then next week w/a different friend. Then practice w/2 friends together, etc. Methinks Montee will soon get the hang of it... then u can have company over again w/out all the headache.

Also, i been meaning to post this, but haven't had time (the house is going crazy preparing for the bday party... we r running around like dogs without tails :eek:).

I think it could work w/the mouthing problem. And also the recent posts on aggression & food and toys. I believe one of the Flash's mom's has a current issue on this. And Mikey T posted something good on how to do exchanges w/dogs.

Well, i wanted to pipe in that i used to have lotsa problems picking up stix and chewing them and eating them, and my person didn't know what to do. i'm better now, but will still sneak a stix when i can every now and then. anyways, my teacher Mrs. C taught this very simple exercise:

1. Pick a phrase, any phrase that works for ur situation. We used "drop it" for the stix. Later did the same thing w/"here, boy!" for long-range recall, but essentially the same exercise. u can use "stop it" or "leave it" or really, whatever u want.

2. 10 times/day (but ya gotta do it 10x every day! but Montee will love u for it), out of the blue, say the phrase, and as soon as u say it, have treats nearby and grab them and put them in the same place every time (my person puts her hand next to her knee). VERY soon, doggie learns to come to u expecting a treat. in the midst of doing so, it stops whatever it is doing (ie. Worm drops the stick, perhaps Montee would stop mouthing, perhpas Flash would drop the toy-- now i don't know about the piece of butcher meat, that is harder, etc.)

3. it requires u to have treats handy where u can reach them. do it whenever he is next to u, or when he is in the other room. but it is amazing and the dog will often drop whatever it is doing to come to u.

4. When u r first training, ALWAYS give a treat. the dog learns that it is super-reliable to come to u when u say that phrase, that he will get a reward. if ur dog hesitates to do this exercise, u can use higher value treats, like boiled chicken, beef, sausage, hot dogs. esp if he hesitates, use this type of treat ONLY for this exercise. it becomes even more effective if he NEVER gets that type of food, EXCEPT during this exercise. this is what i do for Worm-- he gets chicken hot dogs only for long-range recall when he is playing off-leash. because he loooves hot dogs, he comes every time.

anyways, when we first did "drop it" he would do it even without special treats. he actually did it for plain kibble, so that is what i use. he probably would also come long-distance for plain kibble, but because it is a bit risky when he is off-leash (and far away from me), i decided to use hotdogs which guarantee that he comes back. i actually haven't really tried other things for the long-range recall.

yeah, so the exercise is good and works, and doesn't necessarily involve exchanging anything. just diverts dog's attention to u, so it stops doing the thing u don't want it to do (ie. mouthing...)

anyways... all that to say, Montee, u r very young and u r still learning. u did good w/learning so far, and i bet u will learn more and more as u get older, and then make ur person proud...!! ur person loves u a lot and u r very good for them. please keep us posted, esp if it gets better.

--your pal, Worm
 

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Instead of locking him away, why not use having guests over as a training opportunity to show him what behavior is expected from him when there is company. Be prepared with him on leash. He can't be jumping and mouthing if he is required to sit quietly or lie down. Obnoxious behavior can be stopped and redirected immediately if you have the leash.

Real friends will understand that you are training a *puppy* and he can't be expected to be perfect at this age.
Some of your guests sound pretty rude, TBH.

The peeing was probably a stress reaction.

And seriously, putting food out within reach of a basset? Forget about that, it's just an invitation. It is the extremely rare basset who can be trained no to take food that's sitting within reach.
 

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Exactly, Mr Woofus ! He is a puppy.PUPPY.Puppies get overly excited at company-THEN- the people wave their hands and shout at him. I think your guests were out of control,he thought they were playing with him. You are exactly right when you say you need to teach the puppy.Some people don't get that,you do,you're ahead of the game. Ask people to stay calm around him and ignore him,no matter what he does,or if things get out of hand put him in a crate in a quiet room for a break.Take him out when a few of the people leave but keep him on a leash in case he tries to jump up,then you have control.He wants to be good he just doesn't know how to control his impulses yet.Some of that will come with age,keep working with him,you haven't lost the battle. Puppies grow up so quickly,hard to beleive my 8 are almost 10 weeks old.
 

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Can anyone help with the mouthing espcially-i worry someone who doesnt know dogs will think he is biting out of aggression.
one need to have realistic expectation a 6 month is going to mouth the explore the world with their mouth and the are still teething as well. If you were to do absolutely mothing the vast vast majority of dogs as they mature stop outhing without any training or intervent. I am not suggesting not doing anything about the mouthing but you need not go over board. the general procedure is when the dog mouths something inapropriate is to get the dog attention. a loud noise, such as say No! etc is a disruptive stimulus the stops the dog doing what it is doing, it is not punishment, this then give you the oppurtunity to train a more appropriate behavior. Around 8 month you should see a noticable decteas in the mouth behavior, Then suddlenly around 110 month it comes back again often even worse than befor. This again is a second teething stage when the last molors erupt similar to wisdom teeth in humans it is not because the dog is regressing in it training.


Please help, how do clam him down when people are over
You need to keep in mind the developmental stage of the dog when considering what is appropriate and inappropriate behavior. We do not hold toddler to the same standard as teanagers to the same standard as adult an as it should be with dogs as well. A six month dog is in the earlhy strage of adolescent that can last until the dog is 2-3 years old. and with all the implecations of adolescents

Puppy Adolscence - or Demon Spawn

The absolute first thing a person must do is understand what adolescence is.
(I posted part of this about a week ago. Forgive the repeat.)

Every puppy of every breed -- and every adolescent of every species that raises its young -- goes through the same thing at adolescence. Adolescence is an important, necessary transition period between childhood and adulthood. As infants, these creatures were completely helpless, completely dependent upon their mothers for everything -- food, comfort, safety. In childhood, the creatures begin practicing the skills they'll need later.
However, they do it right there with mom in sight, so mom can protect or help as necessary. They instinctively know they aren't able to take care of themselves, so they stick close.

The eventual goal is, of course, adulthood. Complete independence. Mom won't be there to make decisions -- or to alleviate them of responsibility for their mistakes. The real world will be applying consequences, and those can be harsh (even fatal). The animal will, perhaps, become a parent herself, and must have all the knowledge and skills to raise the next generation. Adolescence is the transition between the safe practice of childhood and the
independent, butt-on-the-line reality of adulthood. Adolescence is the time when "Because I said so" simply isn't good enough anymore -- Nature *demands* that they test boundaries and consequences and decide for themselves what decisions they want to make. It's not dominance or rebellion. It's growing up.

the second thing you need to understand that train, learn and anything that requires active think can't and wil not occur when the dog is over excited.

The Overstimulated dog
The brain operates from two sides
- the limbic side and the cognitive side.

The limbic side is your emotional self.
The cognitive side is your thinking self.

Emotional reactions originate in the limbic part of the brain, which allows for fast-acting response to events based on quick impressions. Survival depends on quickness of response — allowing you to notice and duck when you catch a glimpse of a fast-moving object about to fall on your head.

Limbic over-rides cognitive. When an animal is in a state of adrenalin arousal from fear, defense, excitement or just plain sensory overload, he not only doesn't listen, he can't hear you. It does no good to repeat "sit sit sit" to a dog who is on emotional overload. He isn't thinking, he is simply reacting to the stimuli around him. He must tune-in and re-connect with you before he will be able to hear what you have to say. You must be able to get his attention first, before you tell him what you would like him to do.

to this end many thing people think of punishment but really aren't can be helpful. Shout No1, a shaker can, and even a squirt bottle for most dogs is not punishment. The behavior definition of punishment require for something to be punishment it must reduce the likelihood of the behavior from reoccuring ., shouting No/ an shaker can of poennies, a spray bottle with water rarely if ecver reduce the occurance of a behavior, What they do do is act as a disrupotive stimuli which intrupt stops a behavior, THis tend to shut of the limbic side for a moment and givbe you the opurtunity to train a more appropriate behavior, like mouthing an chew toy, or sitting calmly. Which you can then reward.

lowering Arousal
A dog with self-control is a free dog. Freedom for dogs has everything to do
with impulse control and little to do with whether they can heel or shake their paw. Dogs
have to live safely and non-aggressively in a man-made world. Our responsibility to our
dogs means training impulse control, which leads to teaching self-control.
In my experience, a few dogs are born with low arousal levels and they have a natural
sense of self-control. But I find that there seem to be less and less of these dogs. This may
be because of breeding priorities that don’t include low arousal, or it may just mean that
most dogs don’t live in rural environments and therefore they don’t come with very good
natural programming to live in a mainly human-controlled world. I think dogs living in a
busy household or environment never learn self control because they are constantly being
stimulated and conditioned to be up and active, particularly ones who might be crated for
long periods of time. When these dogs are then let out of the crate, owners often allow
them to pace and be continually active in the home environment. Dogs like this can lose
their ability to control themselves, similar to what can happen to dogs in a shelter
environment. Dogs that are continually aroused can have higher cortisol levels
Any Dog Can Live Calmly in a House - Even Yours!

Protocol for Relaxation
This set of exercises has helped countless numbers of dogs learn to relax in the presence of various stimulus. It helps dogs that get over excited, aggressive, that are fearful, that have no "off switch and any dog that goes through this. While it reads like a "stay" training drill, that is not the focus. The focus is on the state of relaxation in the dog. If the dog is not relaxed as you work through the steps, don't progress until the dog is able to relax a bit more than previously. The dog is welcome to change positions and even to walk away from the rewards being offered. Some dogs are too stimulated when clicks and treats are used. You may need to use a lower value reward or simply a smile and petting or massage to encourage the dog to relax.


Rewarding Non-behavior


Guidelines for Teaching Self Control

putting food out within reach of a basset? Forget about that, it's just an invitation. It is the extremely rare basset who can be trained no to take food that's sitting within reach.
A couple important things about training in general and more importantly about training self control. One asspect of learning that dogs differ greatly from human is generalization vs discrimination. Humanssa are great generalizers dogs not at all. Human when they learn something new look to other areas secearioas and context which what they learned also applies. When a dog learns not to jump up on you when you come home from work that is exactly what it has learn. Another context like later that evening return from going to the pet store the dog may jumnp up because it is a different context ie the time is different. the same appies if a different person is involved etc. For a dog to generalize a behavior it must be taught the same thing over and over again in a myriad of context. What dogs are great at is discrimination. That is every time uncle joe comes over he lets the dog jump on him the dog learns he can jump on uncle Joe but not on You. other quest we he will just have to wait and see. So when it comes to train keep this in mind becaiuse a dog learns something in a single context does not mean it learned it applies to other. ie mot jumping on you does not apply to guest unlkess the dog is specifical trained and the training envolved enough different people the dog generalized the behavior. For each dog this is going to be diffrent. As already demonstrated in links above a dog is incapable of learning /or thinking when over excited. So traikning needs to first occur with low distraction levels and once the dog is more profiecent the distraction leves can be increased slowly over time. So if the only time that you have guest over and try to train the dog to be calm is when ther is a loth of them you are not going to be successful you need to work up slowly first with a single quest the two rtc.



I agree with the statement as written but not the conotation that it imply. yes yoiu can have food out and a basset height but it is not about training the basset to ignore the food at nose height, but rather training the dog to go to an appropriat spot and ly down away from where people are eating. It is possible to do if in the end the has a reasonable expectation of getting a bigger reward for remaing out of the way than it can get from trying to steal food

Table Manners
 

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I read on another site that someone runs with their 7month old basset pup, i heard it was good for running off their energy because theyre bred to hunt for hours. I was thinking of taking up running-is this a good idea or not because i worry about his bones still developing-mind you i really cannot run very far
keep in mind I compete in agility with basset hounds and field trial which both are far more traumatic than simply running.

The supject is highly contraversial and the reason is because there is no solid evidence for or against exercise and a link to minimizing or exaserbating chronic joint porblem or causing traumatic injury in dogs. So whether running wi a seven moth old dog is more helpful than harmful know one know you need to make your own judgement. Keep a few things in mind. As a dog ages growth slows so injury to growth plates ate much less damaging to a puppy the older the puppy is. Any excersiz program with a dog sjould not involve compulsion If possible it would be better to run with the dog off leash rather than on but given the dogs training, location etc that is not always possible. For a dog that has not engage in exercise just like humans you need to ramp up and condition the dog.

see FITNESS IN YOUR BACKYARD

Common sense would say it is better to run on softer surface rather than harder but with humans at least common sense is not correct studies have shown that the risk from runniung on harder surface is not greater than softer ones as how an individual runs is adjust to reduce the stress on the joints a hard surface might have. Also common sence would say runner have more knee problems then the average population and again common sense would be wrong. actual runners have less knee problem pain and knee replacement then the general population.

itg sound as if you live in a rathe urban area. Something to consider as a means to help teach the dog better mouthing manners and at the same time provide a release for excess physical energy in a rather small compact space I would strongly reccomend Tug of war

g owners have been admonished for decades to never play tug of war with their dogs because of the risk of it increasing aggression and/or dominance in the dog. Even many dog resource people such as breeders, trainers and veterinarians caution against this game. This is partly a failure to discriminate between agonistic behavior (conflict resolution & defensive aggression) and predatory behavior. Also, many people have issues about witnessing intensity. Intensity is not aggression, however.

Played with rules, tug-of-war is a tremendous predatory energy burner and good exercise for both dog and owner. It serves as a barometer of the kind of control you have over the dog, most importantly over his jaws. The game doesn't make the dog a predator: he already is one.
The game is an outlet. It’s intense, increases dog focus and confidence and plugs into something very deep inside them. The big payoff is in lowered incidence of behavior problems due to understimulation and a potent motivator for snappy obedience. There is a maxim in training: control the games, control the dog. It's also extremely efficient in terms of space and time requirements.


also keep in mind tug creaest a stimulating environment for the dog so you get to practice selfcontrol in a highly stimulated environment

please read the entire article linked above

http://www.4pawsu.com/tugofwardog.htmTO TUG OR NOT TO TUG:
SERIOUSLY, THAT'S STILL A QUESTION?

2002, a study was done to determine whether or not playing tug increased the incidence of aggressive or "dominant" behaviors. The researchers concluded that tug games had no negative effects on the relationship between the dog and human.
As a matter of fact, tug of war is not only an excellent reward in dog training, but it is a valuable exercise in teaching dogs self-control.
If your pup does not play tug and you would like to add this game let me know and I can give you a couple idea to teach him to tug.

a coupla ideas fer ya. when i was in puppy school, my teacher addressed jumping on people and what to do. unfortunately, this wasn't one of my main issues, so we didn't pay that much attention. but yeah, methinks it has something to do with ignoring him when he jumps. i'm sure Mikey T can give u more info on that
the first thing when dealing with any problem behavior we humans general thing about it bacward. It is aways I want the dog not to jump up. Not mouth, not steal food. To stop a behavior fources you to use punishment which most people are actual very bad at because the time required is rediculously hard. secondly hunam have trouble douing so in an an nonemotional manner which is require. But the biggest problem is even if successful the dog has 100'a of other options that are equal as distateful or even worse. rather than focu on what you don't want the dog to do change it completely around and focus on the behavior you do want and train that. instead of train the dog not to jumpo up istead teach the dog to sit quitely when greating people.

Quick Fix for a Jumping Dog

think it could work w/the mouthing problem. And also the recent posts on aggression & food and toys. I believe one of the Flash's mom's has a current issue on this. And Mikey T posted something good on how to do exchanges w/dogs. [/quote]

exchanges for resource guarding and mouthing are slightly different. for example with with mouthing you would never allow the dog to reengage in mouthing. also you are not exchanging an object for food but and object like your hand or finger for another more appropriate object like a chew toy then when the dog chews on the toy you can reward him for doing so with praise, pet food. or any other reward. The other key here is to seek out time to reward appropriate behavior as well that is reward the dog for chewing on a chew toy on his own. by not doing this you are actual end up teach the dog tro mouth first to get an approapiate che toy not what you really want. You need to make a concious effort to reward the dog for behavior you do want and not necessarily asked for. This is the big difference bettween people that have well behaved dogs and those that don't

Those that have well behaved dog alway reward appropriate behavaior often unconsciously but if anything is done enough consciously envetual it becomes an unconscious behavior as well while those with poorly behaved dog tend to unc oncsciously reward inappropirate behavior like jumping up by petting the dog nd greeting them durring their exuberant greeting.

I felt so awful after. I called him over and he wouldnt come over. Later he lay down beside me but after a minute got up and moved away and curled up on his own. I felt rejected and like id been cruel to him-is it possible for a dog to be annoyed at you like this??? Or is it that basset attitude just-were they can be aloof at times-i find monty is like this if he's interested in something else and i feel rejected sometimes:(
Hearding breed and most sporting breed were bred to work with humansd as such through selective breeding they have come to actual enjoy and work simply to please a human this is what is called bidability. The list of so called smart and easy to train dogs is a list of bidable dogs. that is simply because traditional dog training method that rely on coersion and praise work with the personality of these dogs. Basset on the other hand along with other scent hound were bred to work independantly that is without human intervention and control as such they are not very bidable the do not work to please a human the work to please themselves. Unless a basset percieves it is in its best interest it is not likely to follow a cue. The trick to training a basset is to make what you want the dog to do in its best interst, for most basset this means food. So in reality a basset is not so much -aloof but simply self motivated,

see [url=http://flyingdogpress.com/content/view/39/97/]Hard to train
A look at "difficult-to-train" breeds and the reality of what shapes these canine minds.

Quite a few year back their were studies done trying to acess the intellagence of dogs and difference between breed On of the test involve solving a maze as a means of judging indepantant problem solving. in the test Scent hound were represented by beagles and herding breed by shelties. Beagles were consitently faster at solving the maze while the shelties tended to look at the humans in the room for help and directiom. That of course when the maze changed every day. When the Maze remained the same the sheties tende to memorize the pattern and became faster and faster while the beagle use the same original approach of scaning and never got apreaciable fast. This does not make either dog smart than the other but simply point out how personality rait effct how the dog learns and effect there performance in different tasks.
 

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Penny is 3 and still has problems with guests. She also has a problem with peeing when people visit when she gets excited. She's getting better, but we still have some problems. The biggest thing is I tell people to ignore her for about five minutes; she'll then calm down and can be petted without her peeing. I also bought a clicker to get her attention with whenever she starts acting up. It kinda works, but we're gonna have to work at it more.

We also crate her, like most have suggested here. A lot of people come over to hang out with my boyfriend's roommate, but they usually don't stay long. She spends a few minutes in the crate, then comes out to play with us.
 

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I read the original post but not all of the responses so sorry if this is a repeat, but seriously the pup is only 6 months old and sounds like it is on the right track with training sit stay are great. My dog daisy is 15 months old and stopped the mouthing when she was 8 months old. It took us turning our back to her when she would mouth to get her to stop. Keep up the training and remember still a puppy for the first 2 years.
 
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