Basset Hounds Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys

Sorry, but got another question.

My Herbert is 6 months old and is around 50lbs, can you tell me how much exercise he should be getting.

I don't want to overdo it, but obviously not underdo either.

Currently he gets 2 walks a day, morning and evening for around 20-25 mins. This is total time, including walking and sniffing, oh and some lying down too.

Thanks in advance :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
762 Posts
I have had a hard time with this too... every time she'd lie down I'd think, "well that's it... we've gone too far so let's pack her home." But EVERY TIME the dirty little rat hops right on up & sprints away! So hard to tell if they're really pooped or if theyre just being a stubborn stinker!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol, Herb has got specific spots in the walk, where he likes to have a rest, which I let him do, but one is 2 houses away from where we live, so I'm like "we're nearly home now". I'm sure the neighbours wonder why we always stop there.

I've also had someone pull up in their car, asking if we're ok. I'm like "yeah, fine, just having a rest" lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,095 Posts
I do not think there is even a rule of thumb it is very dependant on the dog, and what is expected of the dog

that said I do not believe a walk reardless of the distance at a baset pace consittues exercise mental stimulation yes exercise not so much.

Fitness In Your Back Yard


EXERCISE FOR DOGS
Although research has been conducted using dogs as a model for exercise physiology, little scientific work has been conducted to determine a dog's exercise "needs" in a physiologic and psychological sense (63,64,66,92).
Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules?

all too often the case, however, these opinions generally lack solid scientific evidence to support them. Very little is known about the precise risks and benefits of different types and intensities of exercise in growing animals.
One case control observational study [1] surveyed dog owners and found playing with other dogs to be a risk factor for OCD. Another, similar study [2] found chasing balls and sticks was a risk factor for development of hip dysplasia and elbow abnormalities. However, these studies cannot answer the overall question, which is how much and what kinds of exercise pose how great a risk and provide how great a benefit. One study [3] found exercise to be part of the treatment of carpal laxity, another joint abnormality seen in large breed puppies, and there is no question that exercise has many benefits, including reducing the risk of obesity and simply being part of a normal, enjoyable life for a puppy

...The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Grisman and I have no problem going on multi-hour hikes. Grisman is just about six months old and seems to have no stopping point when it comes to outdoor activity. So I am always careful not to take him to far. Its easy for us to hike for miles if we work as a responsive team. I've found that if I allow him to make his own decision to follow me rather than requiring it, the walk goes a lot smoother. He is allowed to lead, or sniff if he wants, as long as he is moving down the trail, path, or perimeter that I am fowling. If not I become a tree or take lead and guide him. I know I am moving at an unreasonable pace if he is constantly stopping to sniff. He's telling me to slow down, enjoy the surroundings before moving on to new surroundings, so I relax and take it all in before asking if he is ready to keep moving.

I've never seen him stubborn/frustrated enough to lay down during a walk. There is no reason for him to lay when we are walking. I would probably pick him up onto his feet, then praise or click/treat. He is granted as much sniff time as possible if on a short walk. A 20-30 minute walk is not really exercise for him so if I am taking out, It is more for general training, bonding, 'doing business', and mental stimulation.
The only time his body touches the ground when outside is when he is rolling in some sort of poo, which is also not allowed. :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Puppies still growing should not go for really long walks,20 min at most while they are growing. Too much exercise can sometimes affect the bones in the legs, or even cause enough inflamation to develop Pano. There is no literature to validate this so much , as I've heard from other breeders and just don't believe in pushing puppies to the limit.Going 10min beyond 20 on a walk will probably not harm the puppy but I would not extend it beyond that till at least the dog is a year and a half(that age is my opinion only)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for answers guys. Bubbad, that's what I thought I had ready somewhere, about not going for really long walks until over a year old or year and a half as you say. I really don't want to do any long term damage to my little man, hence why I asked the question.

Thanks again :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
My husband works with someone who has a basset. Whenever he goes for a walk he brings one of those chilren's wagons because when the dog has had enough he will just lay down and there is no budging him. When it comes to Barney I wear out faster than he does.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top