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When I came home from work today, I found my husband and daughter on the floor trying to calm Sissy who was having a seizure. She had been in the seizure for several minutes and had lost control of her bodily functions. Since it was after office hours, I placed a call to our vet. Dr. Cheryl called me within minutes. By the time, Dr. called, Sissy was up and walking around. Two weeks ago Sunday, Sissy was in our rec room and we thought she had an "accident" because she hasn't had a problem since she was about 8 months old. We now think that she had seizure instead of an accident. Dr. has Sissy scheduled for tests on Thursday. She was just there on Saturday for her shots and to have her ears checked. Dr. gave her a clean bill of health.
I am just sick thinking of anything being wrong with Sissy. She is 3 years old.
I am wondering if you have had experience with canine epilepsy?
Keep us in your thoughts.
Cindy -- Wally & Sissy
 

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Not epilepsy in pets- just people. I know from friends who have dealt with epilepsy in pets though, it can often be treated with medications and they do fine. Keeping you in my prayers- Wendy

Mom to Sami, jake & Abby
 

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We had a Jack Russell once who had seizures due to a kidney problem. You need to have her vetted to see what is causing the problem, as there are other conditions which cause seizures. You and Sissy are in our thoughts and prayers, and The Twosome sling lots of healing drool your way...
Cindy
 

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First, not all seizures are epileptic seizures. Seizures can be primary or reactive/secondary. Reactive/secondary seizures are due to some underlying cause, such as traumatic head injury, exposure to toxic agent(s), low blood sugar, liver disease, etc., etc.

Primary seizures don't have an identifiable underlying cause, and these seizures characterize idiopathic (no known cause) epilepsy. A genetic component is currently suspected in many, if not most cases of idiopathic epilepsy. If Sissy turns out to have idiopathic epilepsy, her breeder needs to be notified.

Seizure Disorders--a basic explanation of seizures--which ones are epilepsy and which ones aren't.

Here is a link to Purdue's Canine Epilepsy Network.

See also Seizure and Epilepsy Links.

A word of warning--there are some rather extensive (and pretty!) websites about epilepsy in pets, put together by well-intentioned individuals, that contain a mixture of accurate information and more dubious material. Watch out for them.

Unfortunately, epilepsy is a chronic condition that doesn't get better; at best, it can only be controlled. Because of this, it lends itself to disreputable people looking to make easy money peddling miracle cures to desperate pet owners. :(

If Sissy is found to have epilepsy, please follow your vet's advice. Be sure to check with him/her before trying any new vitamins or supplements, because these can sometimes lower seizure thresholds or interfere with the effectiveness of antiseizure medications.

Good luck to you and Sissy.

[ December 20, 2004, 10:50 PM: Message edited by: Betsy Iole ]
 

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As Betsy said primary idiopathic epilepsy is a diagnoses made by a process of elimination and under no circumstances is a single seizure enough to make a diagnoses. Many dogs/people/animals can have a single siezure episode that is never repeated in a life time. So it is a bit premature to get to excited.

Epilepsy is a chronic condition and unfortunately gets worse over time. It is believed that each siezure that occurs lowers the threshold for the next. The typical onset of epilepsy is 1 1/2 to five years of age. At this time the best thing you can do is mention the episode to the vet with as much detail about the circustances imeadiately to 24 before the siezure. Keeping a notebook is helpful. It can identify triggers and/or possible an outside cause.

You may want to schedule a thorough exam with a complete thyroid panel. Low thyroid function is one of the other causes for siezure.

If under the unfortunate circumstance your dog is diagnosed with epilepsy post again and I would be glad to post a "If I had to do it over again what would I do differently post." 10 years ago in Feburary I lost a female to a Status Epilepticus siezure at the age of 2 1/2 after having her first siezure at the age of 1 1/2 and subsequently were never under control even with doses of anticonvulsants that nearly destroyed her liver.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for your input. Sissy has an appointment with Dr. on Thursday. If she has another seizure before Thursday, I am to call and bring her in without an appt. I have printed out Betsy and Toughynutter's responses to take with me to Dr. to request tests suggested.
Toughynutter, I would appreciate you posting "If I had to do it over again what I do differently post."
This morning Sissy acts like her normal self. She was quickly playing after she had her breakfast. As I am get ready for work, she is sound to sleep on her loveseat. Her brother, Wally, is sleeping right next to her.
I found out this morning that Wally was the one who came into our kitchen barking to get the attention of my daughter and husband and running back and forth into our daughter's bedroom where Sissy was having her seizure. Bless his heart for knowing to get Sissy help.
 
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I had a lab who had seizures. The information the vet gave me was that if the seizures became too close together, we could have put him on a seizure medication, but he pointed out it may change his personality. The seizures were maybe one time a month and not really a problem for the dog, but were very upsetting to the humans! The seizures were closer together as he got older (he lived until he was 15) but he never required any medications. There are so many reasons for seizures you need to have it checked out, but my dog had a great quality of life. Good Luck Sabian's mom
 

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1. if anticonvulsant is needed to control siezures max out on potassium bromide first before beginning pheno-barbitol.

2. investigate newer antisiezure medications unfortunately most are metabolized too quickly to be of any use by dogs

3. and most important have on hand liquid valium and a syringe on hand always to administer in case of cluster siezure or Status siezure. Just this may have prevent a death. HOME TREATMENT WITH RECTAL DIAZEPAM FOR CLUSTER SEIZURES IN DOGS
TREATING CLUSTER SEIZURES WITH THE RECTAL AND ORAL VALIUM PROTOCOL


4. Milk thistle while not a proven the likelihood of liver damage from theraputic levels of Pheno is great so I would take a chance that it may do some good.

5. have thyrod test before anti-siezure medication, the anti siezure medication can effect thyroid panel Her reading was borderline low when medicated, and did display some symptoms of hypothyroidism However medication did not help.

FWIW the longest she went between siezures was 66 days this was between the first and second. The siezures accured mostly at night or just before awakening in the morning, We came to dread Thursdays because that was the day siezures usual happened. She average 1 siezure every 2 weeks and was uneffected by medication. The neurologist was looking for one every 2-3 months as being under control further reading it seams 1 a month is more apropriate. Her post siezure recover was at least 24 hour sometimes up to 48 before she was herself again. Where it is significant or not I don't know but she was the only dog I have had that never showed any signs of dreaming.
 

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i totally understand what your going thru, i have a bassett whom is alittle over a year old and at 8 months was treated for epilespy with phenobarb. she has been prescribed with 32mm of it twice a day and hasnt had a prob since we put her on it. her symptoms was very simular to what your having, we spent approx. 3500$ on every test for her, and they all came out negative. good luck!! and were all thinking about her here in california!!
 
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