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Discussion Starter #1
Our 11 month old basset, Watson, seems to have a bit of a crooked led. At first, he just limped after long hikes or long hours in his kennel, but it soon went away. We have noticed that when he sits, Watson front leg bends out a bit, but it seems to have become worse over the past few weeks. We made a vet appointment, but it was cancelled today due to our snow storm. I have done some research and I think that Watson might have elbow dysplasia. I was wondering if anyone had any info on it that they could share with us?
 

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There are several possible causes of forelimb lameness. Here are links to information on some of the causes. Crossing my fingers that it's not serious. :)

Basset Hound Health Links Scroll down to "Elbow Dysplasia" and "Panosteitis".
Elbow Dysplasia
Elbow Arthrosis: Basic Principles

From the Basset Hound FAQ,
In diagnosing the cause of a Basset's lameness, a radiograph of the forelimbs may indicate a condition called elbow incongruity. (Elbow incongruity is a poor fit between the 3 bones which comprise the elbow joint.) Studies to date indicate that elbow incongruity is normal in the Basset and is not the cause of the lameness. It is also suspected
 that many of the previously mentioned unnecessary (panosteitis) surgeries have been performed on Basset Pups just because radiographs that were taken showed elbow incongruity. A study on forelimb lameness in the Basset is currently underway at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. As previously mentioned they have determined that elbow incongruity occurs in the Basset but suspect that incongruity rarely causes the lameness. During the course of the study, conservative therapy will be recommended for all cases in which panosteitis appears to be the cause of the lameness. In cases with severe growth deformities or elbow pain associated with elbow incongruity, surgery may be recommended. If your Basset develops lameness and is diagnosed with an \"elbow problem\", discuss with your veterinarian the possibility of panosteitis.
 

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Toughy has an elbow incongruity of 6MM the ortho vet said he saw incongruities of twice that amount not cause a problem in other breed, as it turned out he had PANO and it lasted of and on for 18 months.
effecting every limb at least twice.
 

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Does the leg bend forward or to the side? I was wondering if Watson might be knuckled over and that's what your observing. Can't find a picture at the moment that show's it clearly.
 

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Like this? Winstons right front leg (left in the picture) is severely disformed. (Winston is the bigger dog) This picture dons't show it the best. I might take another one tonight to post tomorrow.


The vet said his body grew to big weight wise, while his bones were still forming causing them to twist when he was young. The result now is a gross looking deformation that dosnt bother him a bit. Sometimes I yell at him to fix his leg because when he sits his leg will be turned totally backwards. So that his fingers are pointing towards his butt. Gross! But it dosnt slow him down and is not painful to him. So the vet said leave it be for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you for all of your replies. We'll try to load a picture to illistrate it better. His leg is bent torwards the side, it's his front right, and it basically looks like he's holding out in front of his body, knd of at an angle. It really doesn't seem to bother him at all though, so I don't know what to do about it.
 

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Cooter had pano as a puppy, and has outgrown it. I don't know if it's a result of that, but he does have one leg (front right) that is crooked. It doesn't bother him a bit, and he still runs and plays. So, I have the vet check it, but until it bothers him, there's nothing to do.
 

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Well, Watson had Pano at about 6 months, so maybe that is what this is, it's the same leg. I hope so. I would like to load a picture to illustrate the problem, but we can't seem to figure out how to do that. If anyone can tell us how, that would be appreciated.
 

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Did you go to the vet? How is Watson?

My Norton has been limping for the past three months. My vet didn't see anything wrong, thought it was pano. Finally, after three months, he did feel something wrong and sent us to an orthopedic specialist, who did X-rays and diagnosed Norton with something called "premature closure of the distal ulnar physis, leading to radius curvus." He's having surgery on March 23.
 

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(Also posting this info to this thread as it may be relevant here, too.)

Sorry to hear about Norton; hope his surgery goes well.

From Tampa Bay Area Veterinary Specialists

Angular Limb Deformities
Angular limb deformities are usually caused by asymmetrical growth of paired  bones as a consequence of trauma or breed-related developmental disorders. The  most common problems involve the antebrachium because of asymmetrical growth  of the radius and ulna. The distal ulnar physis can be damaged by minimal trauma,  which may lead to premature physeal closure and asymmetrical growth. We also  see premature closure of the distal ulnar physis without trauma in chondrodystrophoid  breeds such as Basset Hounds. These dogs frequently develop excessive carpal  valgus, which may be accompanied by cranial bowing of the radius and pronation  of the foot. Some dogs also develop elbow subluxation, which may not be obvious  clinically, but may be a significant source of pain and lameness. It is important  to carefully evaluate these dogs clinically and radiographically prior to developing  a treatment plan. Immature dogs with premature closure of the distal ulnar physis  may be helped with a segmental ulnar ostectomy. Carpal valgus deformities are  usually treated with a corrective osteotomy of the radius stabilized with a plate,  external fixator, or cross-pins. Elbow subluxation is usually treated with a  dynamic proximal ulnar osteotomy. We occasionally see severe deformities resulting  in limb shortening, which might best be treated with osteotomy and Ilizarov (ring) fixation. Prompt and thorough evaluation of these patients is essential for treatment  planning and an optimal outcome.
Additional links:

Angular Limb Deformities (D. Degner DVM)
Angular Limb Deformities, PetPlace.com (Dr. C. Reese)
 
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