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Thanks Betsy. From what I can deduce, Stryker grew too big too fast and played too hard as a puppy. His breeder claims no history at all in either of his lines (his sire's elbows are clear, she didn't do the dam), but that doesn't mean it isn't there genotypically, it just hasn't shown itslf phenotypically. She's had 2 litters out of this bitch. In Stryker's there were only 2 males, he was the largest and elbow dysplasia occurs more often in males than females. 12% of all Labs studied (24,000) have elbow dysplasia. I really think she should have given me more info as to what he shouldn't do as a puppy. The only exercise he got besides mediocre walks was retrieving at the beach, on sand or in water. Was I not supposed to encorage a retriever to retrieve? I'm so frustrated. Molly's feet are much better though but unfortunately she feels better and wants to play with Stryker. And a week after the surgery he doesn't want to put weight on the left front which was the side with little problem. Back to the vet tommorrow. Thanks again for your help, Belinda.
 

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Sorry to hear about Stryker. :( Will he be able to resume normal activity once he heals? Will he be able to jump for obedience?

The getting too big too fast problem (over-nutrition) is thought to contribute to a bunch of skeletal developmental disorders, including pano . Hence the development of large breed puppy foods and the practice of switching large breed puppies to adult food at around 6 months. I'm much more aware of it with Caper. She might do better in the show ring if she carried more weight, but I'd rather be safe and not have her carry excessive weight while she's still growing.
 
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