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Hello all. New to the site after searching for ideas on what is wrong with our Basset Bailey.
All of a sudden 2 weeks ago he started limping on his front leg. After a few trips to the vet, and a set of xrays, they believe he has elbow dysplasia. There is a gap between the bone and the elbow `ball`, this they say is the problem. They want him to have surgery to sort this out. This is going to cost £1000 per leg. They cut the bone, and this will lengthen to fit the joint.
I have a few points I would like peoples opinion on!
1. He is only 7 months old, wont his bones still be growing?
2. The vet doesnt pin the bone, just bandages it for 1 week, then light lead work for 6 weeks, is this normal?
3. Have any of you had this work done, and did it work?

I would like to hear anything you have to say on this matter, as we are so worried about our little fella.

Thanks.
 

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Do not agree to anything until people on here with much more experience chime in, but this sounds like phooey to me. Many vets just do not understand bassets and are so quick to recommend surgery. I'm sure someone will reply very soon with their ideas.
 

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thanks, we wont rush into anything, we are looking at all options as we have to make the right choice for our little hound, getting it wrong is not an option!
 

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Absolutely I would get a second opinion from a vet familiar with the breed, preferably an orthopedic vet. Many vets do not understand how bassets grow, especially males, and recommend unnecessary surgery on a normal basset. Not saying that ED never happens, but basset x-rays tend to freak vets out.
 

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In cases like your 90% of the time the dog has Pano not. Elbow displasia as in elbow incongruities are actual required for the dog to meet the meet the breed standard ie crooked legs . However, if the inconrguity is too larger it can be a problem. For instance when Toughy when through his bout of Pano began at 5 months and last past 14 he had xrays done. He had an elbow inconguity of 6 mm the vet said he has seen as much as 12mm without ever causing a problem,. 12 mm is nearly 1/2 inch. Toughy can be seen in the avatar He did agility up till his death at 12 years and never had another othropedeadic problem following his case of pano which wasmore severe than most.

see The following is from the Basset Hound Faq by Judy Trenck
Paneosteitis is an elusive ailment occasionally seen in young Bassets. It is also known as wandering or transient lameness. Attacks are usually brought on by stress and aggravated by activity, and up to now, the cause and the cure are unknown. This mysterious disease causes sudden lameness, but its greatest potential danger may lie in false diagnosis, resulting in unnecessary surgery. A puppy will typically outgrow it by the age of two with no long term problems. It can be quite minor, or so bad that the dog will not put any weight on the leg. Symptoms may be confused with "elbow displasia", "hip displasia", "patellar luxation" and other more serious disorders. The most definite way to diagnose paneosteitis is radiographically. Even with this, signs can be quite minimal and easily missed. As to treatment, no cure was found in experimental tests and the only helpful thing found was relief for pain (aspirin, cortisone, etc.) However, using these, the dog tends to exercise more and thereby aggravate the condition. Note again: A GREAT MANY VETS ARE UNAWARE OF THIS DISEASE IN THE BASSET .
In diagnosing the cause of a Basset's lameness, a radiograph of the forelimbs may indicate a condition called elbow incongruity. (Elbow incongruity is a poor fit between the 3 bones which comprise the elbow joint.) Studies to date indicate that elbow incongruity is normal in the Basset and is not the cause of the lameness. It is also suspected that many of the previously mentioned unnecessary (panosteitis) surgeries have been performed on Basset Pups just because radiographs that were taken showed elbow incongruity. A study on forelimb lameness in the Basset is currently underway at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. As previously mentioned they have determined that elbow incongruity occurs in the Basset but suspect that incongruity rarely causes the lameness
Ununited anconeal process
Ununited anconeal process (UAP) is a manifestation of elbow dysplasia most commonly seen in young German shepherds, with an incidence of 18% to 30% in this breed (Figure 1) (1). Other breeds affected include several giant breeds and chondrodystrophics, especially the basset hound (1,2). The ossification center at the anconeal process normally fuses by 5 months of age, and so the presence of a lucent line on radiographs confirms the diagnosis in dogs past this age. The exceptions are the St. Bernard and basset hound, in which the anconeal process may fuse as late as 7 to 8 mo (2
Dynamic Ulna Osteotomies in Canine Elbow Displasia
A small size intramedullary pin is placed proximally by some authors to provide limited stabilisation, particularly in short leg dogs, like Basset hound. Usually in most dogs no fixation is applied, to allow a spontaneous anatomic realignment of the proximal ulna in the elbow joint and to avoid later pin removal or pin migration and breakage. A light bandage to protect soft tissues is kept for eight days and the dog is kept at strict rest for 4-6 weeks
 

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but basset x-rays tend to freak vets out.
Ummmm - Yep - they don't call them spare part dogs for nothing. But that is also part of their charm. I'd also go to an orthopedic vet for a second opinion and ask them what other Basset's they've worked on.

Jen~
 

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Hmm, I'm shocked nobody thought this sounded familiar. Our Olive went through the same exact surgery at the same age.

http://www.basset.net/boards/basset-hound-health-genetics/15614-little-girl-7-mo-old-has-bad-limp.html

Her front leg is MUCH better now. She does get worn out a little faster if she's playing hard, but overall, she's just fine. The surgery does sound sketchy, I know. I've been right where you're standing. Just make sure you've done you're research and your working with the best vet possible. It's an expensive surgery, too. Here in Germany, it cost us around 700 Euro, I believe. The earlier you do it, the better. At 7 months, her growth plate is still open and that's what you want. If his bone is curving out as badly as Olive's was, he'll need that growth time for his leg to straighten itself out post-surgery. If you do the surgery once the plate is closed, his bones will probably be set permanently into whatever funky position they've ended up in from the gap.

If you want any tips or what-not-to-do's, please feel free to message me! I'd love to help you A) take care of Bailey and B) ease your worried furparent mind!
 

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currently going thru a similar? thing with our 10 month old from local rescue group. got her at 12 weeks....began limping several months ago, pain, vet suspected pano vs elbow dysplasia and xrays were not conclusive. did show very early fusion of growth plates (at 4 to 5 months) treated symptomatically with previcox and tramadol prn. with positive results. overall improvement however affected leg will "buckle" periodically now. final diagnosis pending. may be combination of both. good luck. would be interested to hear what you find out.
 

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Hmm, I'm shocked nobody thought this sounded familiar. Our Olive went through the same exact surgery at the same age.
not at all the problem is the surgery is often performed when it is unecessary the problem is this If for example the symptoms where not caused by the elbow inconcruity but something like pano when in the case of pano the problem will resurface again in another leg the Vet will again be looking at the wrong cause given the nature of Pano the problem will resoolve itself in a couple of week and the diagnose of a strain or sprain seem right. If however it something that need to be corrected surgicaly and is not like you said better result occur from doing the proceedure earlier rather than later. It is why a proper diagnoese is correct and we certainaly can no make such on this forum but getting a second and third opinion is a prudent thing to do because many unnessecary surgery have been done.
 

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I am a new Basset momma. My sweet pup Molly Mae has started limping, not playing any more and all she wants to do is sleep. She started this late last night. I called me vet and they are not open until Monday. Any ideas? She hasn't been fallen, been stepped on.or anything .. I'm really concerned about my sweet girl.
 

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My sweet pup Molly Mae has started limping
which limb and what age. If it is a fore limb and 5 month or older Pano is a likely cause especial in the abscent of any trauma. Pano is self limiting ie they out grow it however there is not anything you can do tpo treat it other than pain management.

Canine PANOSTEITIS
Canine panosteitis is a disease that affects only large or giant breeds, most often the German shepherd, although it has been reported in the bassett hound, Scottish terrier, Great Dane, St. Bernard, Doberman pinscher, German shorthaired pointer, Irish setter, Airedale, golden retriever, Labrador retriever, Samoyed, and miniature schnauzer.(1,4,9,10,12,14,17) Males are affected more commonly than females(1,5,10) (reported range 67%(6) to 84%(10)). The disease cycle in the long bones of males is more predictable and repeatable. The female usually has her first episode in association with her first estrus.(20)

The average age at presentation is 5 to 12 months,(4-6,10,22,24) although German shepherds have been documented to have the disease as young as 2 months of age and as old as 5 years.(4) In one study, 20% of the animals were 18 months old at initial presentation.(4) The initial presenting complaint is usually an acute onset of lameness persisting for 2 to 14 days(1,4,20) with no current history of trauma. The disease begins in the bones of the forelegs, with the ulna being affected most often (42%), followed by the radius (25%), humerus (14%), femur (11%), and tibia (8%). The severity of these attacks becomes reduced and the interval between successive episodes increased with advancing age.(22) The degree of lameness usually increases during the first few days of an attack, remaining unaffected by either rest or exercise.(5) Periods of lameness are often accompanied by anorexia and lethargy. There may be a spontaneous regression of signs within 3 to 4 days with or without therapy,(22,23) however, more commonly the lameness is noted to shift from one limb to another every 2 to 3 weeks,(2,9,23) with occasional lapses of one month between episodes.4 In general, the pattern is from front limb to hind limb to recur again in the forelimb.(20) Recurrence of the disease in a previously affected bone is seemingly rare;(2,22) however, in chronic cases the repeated occurrence of lesions can be found in the radius, followed by the ulna, with fewer repeats in the humerus and femur. The length of the cycle of disease is 90 days, but in some cases it extends to 160 to 190 days.(5,24) The interval between each skeletal cycle is 160 to 180 days. In one study, 53 of 100 dogs manifested multiple bone involvement, while 49 of 100 dogs showed multiple limb involvement on initial presentation.(4) As many as seven bones in various stages of disease have been observed to be affected during an episode in one dog. Clinical signs persist on an average of 2 to 9 months,(5,24) with the disease generally disappearing when the dog reaches 18 to 20 months of age.

...There is, however, pain upon firm palpation of the diaphyses of affected long bones; the pain is believed by some to be directly proportional to the amount of periosteal reaction present.(10) The degree of pain manifested clinically may range from slight to exquisite, with lameness being minimal to nonweight-bearing in severity. Since the pathologic bone formation occurs haphazardly in both time and location, multiple bones of the same limb or multiple limbs may be affected simultaneously; also, different phases of the disease may be occurring concurrently in any given animal.(4,11) Radiography is generally necessary to distinguish panosteitis from other disease conditions; however, the radiographic changes in early and late phases are subtle and far less distinct than those of mid-disease. It is generally rewarding to radiograph multiple long bones in an attempt to reveal more pronounced lesions.(4) It is important to realize, however, that generally there is no distinct relationship between the severity of radiologic changes, the amount of pain elicited on palpation, and the degree of lameness the animal manifests clinically (4,5,22)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks to everyone who has replied with info for me. Its good to know there are other people out there who have been through similar.

We are going to see the bone specialist very soon, hopefully this week. I will have plenty of questions for him, and will be quizzing him on Pano.
I do wonder if it is Pano, so much fits with the info people have posted, but maybe I am just hoping too much for a non-surgical solution. The lameness in his forelimb did occur very suddenly, although he did have a very good run with next doors Springer the night before we noticed it. It got worse as the days went on, and I would say 7-11 days afer first spotting it it was at its worst. 16 days have now passed, and we think there is a slight improvement, he is still not right though. The strange thing is it really doesnt seem to bother him. He is exactly the same hound as before, but just with a limp. It is all very odd.
 

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Oh, I forgot to mention that for any case of lameness the dog should be put on strict crate rest to allow the injury to heal, especially if s/he is on painkillers because as the dog feels better they may do too much and reinjure the leg. Usually at least 2-3 weeks sometimes as much as 6 weeks dpepnding on the severity.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quick update.
Been to see the specialist today. He knew about bassets, said that his elbow was not normal, but he said that no basset has a `normal` elbow. Asked about Pano, he knew all about it, but was confident its not that. He said he had looked at his xray from our vet and the problem is the longer bone (sorry, names escape me) is still growing, but the shorter (ulna?) has stopped. This is causing the joint to part (very visible, even to me on an xray) and thus pain. He will be going for an op on 11th september to cut the bone, and let it sit back in the right place.
He is confident of a good outcome.
 

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In short, Bailey is having the EXACT same problem Olive had when she was 7 months old.

Looking forward to this surgery for you guys. As long as the surgeon is experienced, the outcome is going to be completely worth it. :)

Oh:

long bone = radius

short bone = ulna

;)
 
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