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Discussion Starter #1
My husband's vice is yogurt covered raisins and he gets them in bulk. The bag must have been hanging out of the cupboard so slightly and Louie was able to pull them out of the cupboard and eat them all - about a pound we figured. This all happened yesterday morning around 9ish and we didn't even know what he'd eaten until my husband had his craving for his raisins (wierdo...i know). He played and ate normally and then around 8pm last night he vomited it all up several times. But only the yogurt raisins - even though he had eaten his regular food after the raisins, his food didn't come up with it. I find that strange. That a dog can digest around something.

Anyway, i am fully aware that grapes and raisins are apparently poisonous - causing kidney failure in dogs. I am calling the vet this morning and will likely have to bring him in for some blood work (i expect) to check for kidney failure. I'm just wondering if anyone else has had this happen to them.. ?
We figure he vomited it all up because it was a very large amount, and he did it until nothing would come up anymore.

Sorry to be a bit gross. We're just hoping all is well and we haven't inadvertently poisoned our dog :(

He's acting his normal self this morning...but man are we ever worried.

Dana
 

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No experience, just want to say I hope he's OK, I know how worried you must be. Please let us know what happens with the vet-
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok, well when I called the vet they said to get there ASAP!!
Apparently it doesn't matter the amount of raisins that is ingested, in some dogs it can be fatal just having a small amount. They don't know the cause and why it only affects certain dogs, but waiting for signs and symptoms of kidney failure is waiting too long and by then it can be too late.
Louie vomited a couple of times before the vet but was fine on the way to the vet.
He needs to stay there for a couple of days (hopefully home on friday) so he can have his system/kidneys flushed with iv fluids and tests to make sure he's not in kidney failure. He was acting normally (besides the vomiting - which could have been just some gastric irritation from the raisins) so we're hoping we caught it in time.
So make sure you lock up those grapes and raisins!!!!
We're going out to buy child locks on all the cupboards tomorrow!!
 

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Yeah, like 4 years ago Lonie ate rasins out of some birdfood in the back yard and had a one bad day and a few slow sleepy ones, but he's fine now. I have never actually seen a dog die from eating raisins but they do need supportive care after they ingest them. Sounds like Louie has made it though alright too. Right on.

Rachael
 

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Sure hope Louie will be OK. Keep us posted on how he is doing and Bogie Carter is sending lots of healing drool for your boy.

Here is a list of other food items we eat that are toxic to dogs I found on the internet.
Chocolate
Chocolate is toxic to dogs, though a toxic dose will vary depending on factors like whether the dog ate the chocolate on an empty stomach, if the dog is particularly sensitive to chocolate, and the type of chocolate, since dark chocolate is more toxic, whereas milk chocolate less so, and white chocolate must be consumed in extremely large quantities to cause a serious problem.

Theobromine is the toxic ingredient in chocolate. Theobromine serves to stimulate the central nervous system, resulting in rapid heart rate, seizures, tremors, vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, panting and extremely fast pulse.

Grapes and Raisins
Grapes and raisins are toxic for dogs. Grapes and raisins (which are dried grapes) will trigger acute renal (kidney) failure. They kidneys act as filters for toxins in the dog’s body, therefore, when the kidneys are not functioning properly, toxins accumulate in the body and lead to death due to toxins. Urine production will also slow significantly or cease in cases of grape or raising toxicity in dogs, so this can suggest a very serious problem if observed in an animal who may have accessed grapes or raisins.

Onions and Garlic
Onions and garlic can trigger a form of anemia where the body’s red blood cells burst. This results in poor oxygen supply to the vital organs and tissues. When fed regularly in small doses, serious and potentially deadly nutritional deficiencies can also result. So dog owners should always check ingredients of prepared foods before offering these foods to pets. Baby food very often contains onion powder. So French onion soup and other food items containing onions and garlic should be crossed off the list of dog-safe foods.

Avocado
Avocado fruit, pits, leaves and the actual plant are all potentially poisonous to dogs, along with other pets like cats, mice, rats, birds, rabbits, horses, cattle and goats, among others. Avocados will trigger fluid accumulation in the lungs and chest, leading to difficulty breathing and death due to oxygen deprivation. Fluid accumulation can also occur in the heart, pancreas and abdomen.

Tomatoes, Potatoes and Rhubarb
Tomatoes, potatoes and rhubarb contain oxalates, which trigger abnormalities with the nervous system, kidneys and digestive tract. Especially toxic are green tomatoes, green potatoes, potato skins, and tomato leaves and plants, can trigger tremors, seizure and heart arrhythimia, so tomatoes should never be given to dogs.

Cat Food
Cat food is very high in fats and protein and when ingested by a dog, particularly in large amounts or on a regular basis, the cat food can cause a bout of potentially deadly pancreatitis. It should be noted that all high-fat foods – particularly ham and bacon - have the ability to trigger pancreatitis, therefore pet owners should also use caution when offering table scraps that are high in fats.

Alcohol
Dogs cannot tolerate alcohol, even in small amounts. And the hops in beer are also potentially toxic to dogs. Alcohol ingestion by dogs can result in intoxication, liver failure, coma, seizures and death.

Nuts
Macadamia nuts and walnuts are toxic to dogs, and these foods can also trigger pancreatitis. Peanuts can trigger a deadly allergic reaction.

Mushrooms
Mushrooms contain toxins that will trigger numerous organ systems, including the kidneys, liver and brain. Nervous system abnormalities, seizure, coma, vomiting, and death can all result when a dog ingests mushrooms.

Other miscellaneous foods that are toxic to dogs include: raw eggs and egg whites, raw fish, nutmeg, salt, tobacco, trash items, persimmons, marijuana, yeast and dough containing yeast, liver, marijuana, hops, human iron supplements and xylitol, which is contained in chewing gum and candies.

In the event of an emergency involving a pet who may have ingested a toxic food or other potentially deadly substance, pet owners should contact a veterinarian and/or an animal poison control hotline, such as the ASPCA Poison Control Center, which can be contacted by calling 888-426-4435
 

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Discussion Starter #6
great list. I was familiar with most of those. I however feed Louie peanut butter everyday. Is this different from the actual peanuts? I guess it's like humans with the allergic reaction? The vet is ok with feeding him peanut butter and I put it in his kong.
I like how Marijuanna is mentioned twice...lol

On a Louie update...looks like I can probably pick him up this evening. All of his blood work and kidney function tests are normal - thank goodness!
 

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Great list and great news about Louie!

I also give my dogs peanut butter. Interested to hear the difference in giving peanuts vs. peanut butter.
 

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So glad to hear that Louie is going to be just fine! Probably took a few years off your life though! :lol: Never a dull moment with dogs! :p

I give Yogi peanut butter in his kong as well.

I never heard of potatoes and skins being toxic for dogs though. That doesn't sound right to me. In fact my vet recommends baked potatoes with boiled hamburger for Yogi when he sick since he doesn't like rice. He eats potatoes and the skins all the time in his diet.
 

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Uncoocked potatoes are bad for dogs. The composition changes when heat treated, coocked.[/b]
the problem with lists like this in order to be comprehensive they tend to go over board and there to rational thought to the actual risked posed. Keep in mind for toxins to be toxic they much reach a certain level below which no harm occurs. Is there any netion of how many green tomatoes , or green potatos or grean potatoe skins need to be eaten, And who is feeding this anyway. The amount of the toxin in the ripe vegitables is greatly diminished so the risk is really nil. so lots of green tomatoes are bad on the list it becomes all tomatoes are bad. which is not the case. oxyelate posioning from eating plants primarily occurs in sheep. Far and away number one cause of oxcylate posioning in dog is from the ingestion of ethylene glycol, [antifreeze}

Look at mushrooms bad for dogs because some wild ones are poisinious, What are the odd of a human feed a dog a wild mushroom that they would not eat. Not a big risk and those mushroom that humand eat are safe for dogs as well, that is if you can even get the dog to eat one. Mushroom Poisoning in Dogs
Mushroom poisoning occurs as a result of ingesting toxic mushrooms. Not all mushrooms are poisonous,[/b]
which paints quite different picture than that presented




avacado's again the evidence is slim ]Putative avocado toxicity in two dogs. Involves dogs in an african country with a fondness for avacados, Wich in reality reads eat a lot on a continious and ongoing basis. This kind of toxicity has been note in humans as well and there is no big declaration don't eat avacadoes it can kill you. The odds a size appropriate ingestion of avacadoes ocassional by a dog is highly unlikely to create a toxic effect
also see Avacadoe in pet Food?

The part of the Walnut that is hazardous is the husk. Dogs please note: some walnuts and fungi can be poisonous
Rotting husks sometimes contain an aflatoxin that can kill dogs that chew on them. Aflatoxins are poisons produced by mold, fungus and mildew.[/b]
This is the same fungus that killed dogs and cause the diamond dog food recall among others because of contaminated corn, Don't hear much about the toxicity of corn though


and of course the theroretical but highly unlikely vitamin A toxosis for eating liver and when did it become in anyones best interest to avoid foods that are nutrious but cause an alergic reaction in a very small population of animals. Never feed peanuts or peanut butter because minute fraction are allergic. One should avoid raw because of the possibility of saminella but to say that raw eggs fish etx are toxic is over the top,

Ask Dr Mike : Allergies, feeding peanut butter with pills and benadryl , I know of no reason that you shouldn't give peanut butter to your dog. I
suspect that it can cause problems with allergic reactions in dogs, just
like it does in people, but that would not be a common problem and if you
have no reason to suspect it occurs, it probably doesn't.

The Dangerous(?) Vitamin A
Stedman's medical Directory further says this, specifically about dogs:

"Vitamin A is one of the two vitamins in which oversupplementation can have negative effects. However, we have never seen a case of oversupplementation causing toxicosis, and in dogs, toxicity has been demonstrated only under experimental conditions. Toxic doses of Vitamin A could produce muscle weakness and bone abnormalities. Realistically, oversupplementation or toxicity is virtually impossible unless mega-doses are given for long periods of time (months to years)."[/b]

but at the same time the list give little mention to xylitol which can be highly toxic to dogs in realitively small quanities. Popular sweetener is toxic for dogs
As few as two or three sticks of xylitol gum could be toxic to a 20-pound dog, the ASPCA says[/b]
JAVMA Press releaseCases of xylitol poisoning in dogs rise[/url]
The center managed more than 170 cases of xylitol poisoning in 2005, up from approximately 70 in 2004, said Dana Farbman, a certified veterinary technician and spokesperson for the center. As of August, the center had managed nearly 114 cases in 2006.[/b]

On needs to use a little common sense when it comes to some of these alarmist publications
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks Mikey!!
I figured that most of it was common sense - which you pointed out well...

i couldn't fathom taking away Louie's precious peanut butter...he loves it so!

Louie is home and besides being a little sleepy is his normal dorky self...god love him!

Here's a pic to say thanks for all the love!


and here's just a couple of him goofing around as usual!


 

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Yippee! Glad to hear Louie is home and doing well. And what a ham! Love that last pic.
 

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Those are great pics...he's a handsome boy! Glad he's doing better.

~:Heather
 

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My vet told me that its not just peanuts that are bad, but any whole nut. If the dog doesn't chew the nut enough, it can easily get stuck in the intestines (mostly for small dogs). So peanut butter is a-okay, while a whole peanut (sans shell) is a little riskier if your dog doesn't chew very well.
 

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My vet told me that its not just peanuts that are bad, but any whole nut. If the dog doesn't chew the nut enough, it can easily get stuck in the intestines (mostly for small dogs). So peanut butter is a-okay, while a whole peanut (sans shell) is a little riskier if your dog doesn't chew very well.[/b]
Ah! Thanks for the clarification, Mahna! Casey Chase'em will be glad to know she can still walk around with PB stuck to the top of her mouth.
 
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