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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a large garden that Molly plays in, she is addicted to eating her own poo and other poo's she may find.
We have tried tablets in her food that are meant to stop her but they don't work, we pick poo's up when we see them, but if she is a long way away she will poo then turn straight round and eat it. We shout or make a loud noise to try and stop her but all is no good.
We feed her well, but she will eat poo whenever - there must be a way to stop her, i have been trying now for 3 years. She eats about 2/3 poo's a day.

Any suggestions?
 

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I empathize with you, totally. My Molly does basically the same thing. I have known various dog breeds other than our beautiful babies guilty of the same disgusting act!
I too would be very much interested in a solution
don
 

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I've thrown in the towel on this one. Around here, when one dog starts to poop, the other two line right up. I rarely even hits the ground. It's disgusting and I can't watch, but nothing has worked to stop this......
 

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We had this problem as well when the dogs were puppies. The only way to stop it is to pick up the poop immediately. Now we don't have a problem with them eating their own stools even if the poop is in the yard all day. Although if it is super cold (teens and lower) Yogi has been known to scarf up a poop-sicle so I just make sure that the poop is cleaned up right away. Generally the yard is cleared of poop every single day. Of course, Yogi and Gunny both love rabbit poop and will eat it any chance they get! :rolleyes: I have been known to go out in the yard and pick up the bigger piles of rabbit poop so they can't get it. I do have a problem with Yogi wanting to eat little dog poop when I am walking him so I have to watch him like a hawk to make sure he doesn't get it. Of course the problem would be solved if people would just pick up after their dogs. This is a source of frustration to me, that people are so lazy with picking up their dogs waste while they are walking them. :angry:
 

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I've been fighting the same losing battle for 10 years with Lightning. Recently I heard that dogs who eat their food without swallowing it (which Lightning does) don't digest their food as thoroughly as if it had been chewed (leading somehow to poop eating), so I've switched him from his diet dog food to a regular dry dog food, and I soak it in water first, in the hopes that he'll eat more slowly and the soaked food will make him feel full. I also got one of those dog bowls that is supposed to slow down their eating, although it doesn't slow Lightning down enough to make a difference. It's a little early to decide if my changes have had an effect, but I'll repost if I notice a change. Good luck to you--you're doing the right things, but it's a hard habit to break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys for your replies.

I did try putting pineapple chunks in her food for a while, this worked a treat, then she soon cottened on and started eating it again + it was costin me a fortune in pineapple chunks.

I was hoping for some quick fix solution but it looks like we're all in the same boat. I will keep searching and if i have any solution to this i shall let you guys know.

I love Molly, she is such a great dog, great charactor and a loving dog.

She out poo's me though, blimey they poo, even if you give them just a small amount of food out comes a huge tree trunk of a poo.

I'll keep you all informed.

cheers
 

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Same problem here as well, they especially like frozen poop. We had a blizzard here last night and through out the morning. I let the dogs out and even in the 69 mph winds and blowing snow Max would not come in or even look up at me when I was yelling for him to come in until he finished the poop he was eating.
 

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Have you tried putting some meat tenderizer or better yet papaya enzyme (no salt that way) in the food? My vet said it makes the poop taste bad to them...worked when she was on wet food...but now with all her allergies she is on dry and it doesn't stick so you just have to be vigilant...of course it'll only keep 'em from eating their own poop...not the "tootsie rolls" left by cats

Sandi
 

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My Maggie Mae (ATB) did this when she was very young. The only thing that stopped it was Bitter Apple. She HATED that stuff. She was faster than me but I would immediately get her after she did it if I couldn't stop her and spray her mouth and take the water bowl away for 30 minutes. She freaked. After about 3 times, she stopped. That Bitter Apple is a miracle!
 

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I have the same problem also. There was an article in our Sunday news a couple of weeks ago written by a well known area trainer. All her suggestions sound good but my only option at this point is the probiotics which I want to talk to my vet about when I see him Monday. Here's the link to the article and I'll let you all know if I have any success. It seems like the only thing that works is to be standing there with the scooper in hand and grab it before they do!!



http://www.alldogsgym.com/aboutus/articles-read.asp?id=218
 

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IMHO most dog that eat poop have no medical or dietary issues. My favorite explaination for the behavior is offered by Ray Copinger.

How Wolves became Dogs
Jonica Newby: Are you wondering what all these animals are doing here? Well, they’re all domesticated. This is their natural habitat - here with us. It’s an arrangement that these days we take for granted, but it’s far from ordinary. In fact, it was one of the most extraordinary things that ever happened. Because if our ancestors hadn’t teamed up with their ancestors, we simply wouldn’t be living the way we do.’
But why would such different species come together in the first place? And did we domesticate animals, or did they domesticate us?


To find the answers, we begin with the animal now so close to us, it’s literally attached by strings. The animal that's grabbed the front seat in our lives. And almost behaves like an honorary human. The dog. But there was a time when the dog doesn't exist.

Let me take you back 20 thousand, 30 thousand, 50 thousand years or more. For most of our evolution we **** sapiens did very well by ourselves. We were nomads gathering and hunting and getting smarter at it all the time. But there was another smart predator - in many ways as good a hunter as us. And quite often our territories overlapped.
The wolf has been feared throughout history. It dominates our subconscious, our dreams, our myths. It is the terrifying embodiment of the alien other. Yet our fear is based more on what we have in common than our differences. In the time of the last ice ages, we and the wolf were the closest of competitors. Like us, it had evolved to hunt large, dangerous game. And like us, it had developed a complex social structure and a language rich with subtle signals.

In fact, wolves were almost too much like us. For thousands of years, competition and suspicion kept us apart. But then - something happened. An astonishing leap that turned wolves into dogs, And enemies into friends.

At the site of one of the earliest human settlements, at a place called Ein Mallaha in northern Israel. We see this 12,000 years old - the first fossil evidence of an unlikely alliance. A human and dog or wolf pup buried together in intimate embrace.

Juliet Clutton Brock: ..to see this, particularly this hand on the skeleton I think it’s such a wonderful gesture of affection and I’m sure actually that people had tamed animals and had animal companions for thousands of years before that but it’s just that we don’t have any evidence of it. But it’s a lovely thing.

Jonica Newby: We humans have evolved one of the animal kingdoms most powerful instincts for nurturing. We need it. Our young are completely dependent on us for years - sometimes decades. But the nurturing instinct has had an accidental side effect. Humans are the only animals that keep pets.

Prof. Raymond Coppinger: This is Ellen, she’s one of my favourite dogs, well this week she’s my favourite dogs, I’ve been looking for a dog like this for years, just because she’s a Maremma, she’s small and she’s gentle and for American farms she’s ideal...

Jonica Newby: For a long time scientists believed our nurturing instinct was enough to explain the relationship. We created dogs for our purposes. Man tamed the wolf - as a pet. But one outspoken professor of evolutionary biology thinks the pet theory of domestication is all just a fairy story.

Prof. Raymond Coppinger: How does it work where you go out and you bring a puppy back to the village and you make a pet out of it? And then what happens? A miracle happens, fairy godmother comes and turns it into a dog. How does it turn into a dog?

Jonica: Would you like some lunch?

Prof. Raymond Coppinger: I’d love some lunch, do you think we can have some lunch without the dogs being here?

Jonica: it seems to me pretty reasonable that they go out and get pets. You know they go and get wolf cubs and so on. What’s wrong with that idea of domestication?

Prof. Raymond Coppinger: Well first of all wolves are just trained to run away from you. I mean they’re going to hide their little … isn’t this a much better model. You develop a better mousetrap. You develop a village. You get food in the village. Guess who comes? All right. Now you want to postulate some great scene where I’ve got to go out into the wilderness to get those things. Which one looks, which one looks easier to you? Far from we humans domesticating them, dogs invaded us. Not as pets, but as pests.
.. it’s the rules of natural selection. It’s Darwinism if you will. They’re coming to the food. They’re coming to the waste products and the thing about humans is that there’s tremendous numbers of waste products. Scavenging on village wastes was a wonderful strategy for the early wolf-dog - and maybe they weren't such a complete nuisance after all. Rubbish dumps breed disease. A mobile post-pleistocene garbage service might have come in handy. And it could help explain the dog's least endearing habit. Eating [poop]*.[/b]
* word changed to remove potential offensive slang
 

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Very interesting Mike. It's a good take on animal behavior. I was at the vet today and thought I'd ask him his opinion since I really feel that anything you give them won't stop the habit. He said he has a theory from just listening to people who have dogs that do this. He said in all but one case that he knows of dogs that eat poop live in multiple households. Therefore, he believes it's a form of dominance or submission but more likely dominance. He also feels that we add to it by scooping it up in front of them. He feels if we just wait until they are out of sight and then pick up, the need for them to beat us to it won't be there. He said the one case of the single dog household tried this and it worked for them. I myself have only had this problem with my girls but I guess some have boys that do this including my vet's male lab puppy!! My first thought was the maternal instinct but that theory is blown. I would be curious if those on the board who have this problem have multiple dogs.



Karen
 
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