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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Philly Dawg see Jan 5th article
"Harrisburg Cops Say They Are Not Killing Dogs"

Quote:

"The Harrisburg police department has retreated from its shoot-to-kill policy on stray dogs, after citizens expressed outrage over a city memo ordering officers to shoot dangerous, sick and injured dogs.
The policy statement - issued Dec. 23 after a dispute with the Humane Society of the Harrisburg area left the bankrupt city with no animal control services since October - told officers to shoot animals that they deemed "vicious and a danger to the public or themselves."
This is legal.
But it went on to tell officers to shoot sick and injured dogs and left what to do with healthy dogs up to the police.
It stated the officers could adopt the dog themselves, give it to someone else or deposit it in a "safe environment."
Harrisburg Mayor Linda Thompson, after telling citizens last month the issue had been settled, now says the city has paid its bill ($6,300 from 2011) and is engaged in talks on the 2012 contract.
The humane society however says the 2011 bill is not paid up and it wants $10,000 in an initial payment on the 2012 contract.
Meanwhile, with temperatures approaching single digits, reports of stray dogs continue. The Central Pennsylvania Animal Alliance, which has no shelter of its own and uses foster homes for rescues, has been responding to stray dog requests.
In one case Harrisburg animal control officer picked up a dog yesterday and said he would take it to his own farm until things are resolved.
Ritter said the city is in a difficult position that has left good-hearted officers calling rescue volunteers themselves, according to the Patriot-News.
"We do not have the capabilities of having a 48-hour kennel. ... We've exhausted all of our means of using these animal rescues, which are filled to capacity, so we're kind of like at a dead end," Ritter said.
Tom Hickey, a West Chester resident and member of the Governor's Dog Law Advisory Board, says this situation highlights a statewide problem of shelters closing doors to stray animals because of disputes with municipalities that can only be solved on a statewide action.
Hickey said it's time Secretary of Agriculture George Greig to call for a meeting of the dog law advisory board, which has not met since Gov. Corbett took office a year ago.
"The failure of animal control is not just a Harrisburg problem. We almost had it in Delaware County, and Lancaster County is on the edge," said Hickey.
(In addition, the Pennsylvania SPCA has given up its animal control contract with the City of Philadelphia, but is continuing to take in animals for the next three months while the city sets up its own shelter and animal control operation.)
With Harrisburg, he said, at least the public is now aware of the situation.
"But the Humane Society seems to be absent, without them this can't be solved and dogs are going to die," said Hickey. "I understand city in bad spot. But it's unbelievable that all this happened over $6,000."
 

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Mabe it isn't so surprising this happened over $6000.00.When the rescues run out of money then who feeds the animals? or do we turn them loose?
 

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humane societies are hardly rescue very few ok a miniscule amount practice no-kill standard. aslu rescue mange to survive completely on donations humane societsy many survive om contracts with goverment agencies.

the Pennsylvania SPCA has given up its animal control contract with the City of Philadelphia, but is continuing to take in animals for the next three months while the city sets up its own shelter and animal control operation


it about freeking time no if a state finally smartem up and remove pleace power and enforcement to civilains and take responsibility for animal control and enforcement themselves. there are way too many problems when you have animal right zealots in charge of enforcement.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Quote from Mikey T:
[/SIZE]
it about freeking time no if a state finally smartem up and remove pleace power and enforcement to civilains and take responsibility for animal control and enforcement themselves. there are way too many problems when you have animal right zealots in charge of enforcement. [/QUOTE]

Mike,I think you missed the point- the state isn't doing anything. The dog law advisory board hasn't met since Corbett took office.

Harrisburg is bankrupt and because it hasn't paid the Humane Society for animal control services, and because they have no back-up plan, stray dogs are going hungry and freezing on the streets. The memo that went out to police gave them permission to illegally shoot sick and injured dogs, and put responsibility on officers to 'find a safe place' to storehouse healthy dogs.

Municipaliteis around here are increasingly opting out of using Humane Societies- communities close to me have decided to contract with private kennels because it's cheaper. Also, some are shipping dogs out of their own county to nearby counties. This results in alot of confusion- if your dog is lost, it's often hard to find out where the dog is-

I agree with Tom Hickey:
Quote from posted Philly Dog article:
"Tom Hickey, a West Chester resident and member of the Governor's Dog Law Advisory Board, says this situation highlights a statewide problem of shelters closing doors to stray animals because of disputes with municipalities that can only be solved on a statewide action.
Hickey said it's time Secretary of Agriculture George Greig to call for a meeting of the dog law advisory board."
 

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i don't know what to say about the politics part of things, but Murraysmom, it makes me so sad to hear about dogs being shot & killed. any animals for that matter.

it made me super sad when those animals got out in Ohio (lions, tigers, bears) and almost all were shot & killed. :( i'm sure there's other opinions on what happened there, but i really wished for some other solution.
--Worm
 

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I'm not as worried about the ones being shot, though obviously that's a serious problem. I'm more worried about the ones sent to a "safe environment" since that can mean anything from a dumpster to the side of the road. Starving or being hit by a car is no more humane, if anything less.

Can't make sweeping statements about humane societies or SPCA groups, as literally every one is completely independent and remarkably different. With 10 miles of each other here we have open intake high kill humane societies and very limited intake foster-only humane societies.

Lila came from a humane society that is foster only and very much no kill. In fact they're very picky about adopters and required a home visit first, so they were pretty much the most extreme type of no kill.
 

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I'm with you on the Ohio thing Wormie - I just don't understand why they couldn't tranquilise the animals. Innocent animals should never be treated so poorly and with such disrespect. I appreciate it's a tough financial environment but surely there's a better way to approach things, the thought of a dog being dumped or shot breaks my heart.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm not as worried about the ones being shot, though obviously that's a serious problem. I'm more worried about the ones sent to a "safe environment" since that can mean anything from a dumpster to the side of the road. Starving or being hit by a car is no more humane, if anything less.

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Kirska:

acccording to this Jan 2 Philly Dog article "They Shoot Dogs Don't They"
Philly Dawg

Quote:
What if a Harrisburg resident's dog was lost and did not pose a threat? Here's the city's solution to that problem, according to Harrisburg Police Captain Book's email:
If the animal is determined to be a "found" animal, the officer can ask the complainant if they want to keep the animal or if they know someone who will adopt the animal, or the officer can adopt the animal for himself/herself, or the officer can place the animal in a prisoner van and release it to an area where it will be safe for the animal.
What "safe place?" A park? A forest? An upscale neighborhood in suburbia?
Abandonment of dogs violates the state's animal cruelty law and in addition, releasing domestic animals "into the wild" is against state game laws.
Perhaps the most chilling line in the memo is this:
If you choose to adopt the animal yourself or release it in a safe environment, DO NOT inform the complainant of your intentions.
Maybe the officer could say the animal is going to "a nice farm in the country?"

"What we do know is that Harrisburg animal control has been shuttling animals 60 miles away to a shelter in Chambersburg in an attempt to save their lives for months.
Nancy Gardner, president of the board of the Cumberland Valley Animal Shelter and a member of the state's Dog Law Advisory Board, recently informed the state they would no longer take strays from out of county because they cannot afford it and do not have space."
 

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not making sweeping gfeneralivation about humane societies but about state delegate police function and otherize private not for profit organization police power. the case are well documanet all over the country of the tactic used. and on only neeed to read the murder hollow thread on this political forum for the PSPCA in particular they have had continual out breaks of disease in the kennel
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
update see Jan 12 article "Day 80.." link below:
Philly Dawg

Quote:
" The animal control contract standoff between the bankrupt city of Harrisburg and the Humane Society of the Harrisburg Area entered its 80th day today.
Both sides have been claiming for weeks that a resolution was imminent, but here it is January 12 with temperatures expected to plummet tonight with no one providing animal control for the city."
"The situation flared up again yesterday when the city's animal control officer brought an injured puppy to the humane society only to be turned away. The humane society claimed it was a stunt, the animal control officer said he was doing what he has always done.
Who the heck cares? Anyone who owns an animal in the city of Harrisburg wants to know their animal is safe.
Yet, once again, the "humane" society has turned its back on an animal in need."

"Message to city residents: keep your cats inside, check your fences and, for heaven's sake, hang onto the end of the leash. The last thing you want is to lose your animal in Harrisburg.
The situation appeared to come to a head earlier this month with the release of a police memo directing officers to shoot "dangerous, sick or injured" dogs and to either adopt out or "take to a safe place" healthy animals.
There was no explanation of what a "safe place" is. The definition under the state animal cruelty laws is "abandonment."
Amidst region-wide outrage, the city police chief said officers are "not shooting animals" but there is still no indication that the memo has been rescinded."
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Another update as of Jan 16th:Philly Dawg

Quote from Jan 16 article "Harrisburg Police Order to Shoot or Abandon Dogs Still In Effect":

"The stray dog saga continues to change by the hour in Harrisburg. Today we learned that police officers are still under orders to shoot dogs in the absence of an animal control contract.
The controversial memo directing officers to shoot or "remove" dogs found on city streets is still in effect, despite assurances from city leaders that the order had been rescinded.
So, in other words, Harrisburg police are being ordered to break the law.
Apparently, several officers working the overnight shift last Thursday did exactly that, depositing a puppy in a box under an overpass.
Fortunately the puppy was discovered and someone called the life-saving Central Pennsylvania Animal Alliance - which is bearing the entire expense for services the Humane Society of Harrisburg Area would be getting paid for if there was a contract in place.
An all-volunteer group is providing animal control for a city of 50,000.
The latest plan - so we hear - is to house dogs in a stable on City Island.
That is until the city and the humane society resolve the contract dispute that has left the city without animal control for almost three months.
(Animal advocates point out the contract dispute meant the city had no animal control services for extended periods in 2011 as the humane society activated and cancelled their services each time a payment was made or failed to be made.)
And once again the public is getting promises about a signed contract by next week.
We won't hold our breath. And Harrisburg residents should hold onto their dogs."
 

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OMG - that's crazy...and sad. :(

So, so incredibly sad! Just breaks my heart! I forwarded this article to the rest of the BROOD board...I'm hoping our intake coordinator can get some contacts to at least let people know we might be able to be that "safe place" for bassets. (This area is typically covered by Tri State Basset Rescue though)
 

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What was the deal when the police chief(I believe) talked about," Rogue Cops", when one talked to the press? what an interesting choice of words ,don't you think.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
see Feb. 5th Philly Dawg article "Mayor Signs Contact" Philly Dawg
Quote:

"Mission accomplished for animals in the Capital city?
Frankly, given all the fits and starts, misinformation and excuses from both sides, I am reluctant to share news reports that Harrisburg's animal control contract is signed, sealed and delivered.
After more than three months without contract, Mayor Linda Thompson signed the animal control contract with the Humane Society of the Harrisburg Area, according to the Patriot-News of Harrisburg.
The humane society says everything is good to go and all it was waiting for was Thompson's signature to begin taking animals again.
Nevetheless, late last week a sticking point cropped up over a $250 contract fee charged by the humane society. A local realtor and City Councilman Brad Koplinski volunteered to write a check if it would resolved the dispute.
But in the end Thompson inked the paper.
So, unless there's another snafu - which is not out of the question - Harrisburg strays will again have a place to go."
 
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