Basset Hounds Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,219 Posts
I don't know any dogs who have this but have read about dogs on other forums that have had the more severe type. When do you get the results of the biopsy?
I hope Murray doesn't have it. Keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I don't know any dogs who have this but have read about dogs on other forums that have had the more severe type. When do you get the results of the biopsy?
I hope Murray doesn't have it. Keep us posted.[/b]
We'll get the results by the end of this week. I'll post an update when we get the results-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Murray's biopsy results came back today: he does have discoid lupus, and I'm actually relieved because I was worried it was a type of lymphoma which presents with the same symptoms. Discoid lupus is something that can be managed.

So here's the treatment plan : no exposure to sunlight (he'll have to use a sunblock on his nose), topical tacrolinus (an immune system supressant) for 30 days, and 800 IU vitamin E supplement daily. If it's needed in the future, he'll be put on tetracycline, not for it's antibiotic effects but for it's effects as an immune system moderator.

The vet said any kind of human sunblock can be used, but I'm wondering if anyone has comments about using a sunblock on a dog's nose? They all seem to have so many chemicals in them that I hate to think of him ingesting them. (I've already been told to avoid anything with zinc oxide)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,681 Posts
What symptoms did Murry have to begin with?

I'm very sorry to read about this.....I have systemic lupus and know that the discoid version in humans can have complications in fatigue but with a basset, who knows what is lupus fatigue and basset sleeping. LOL!

all kidding aside, I'm very sorry to read about this.

Regarding tetracycline....it has some not so lovely side effects like diarrhea and causes yeast infection so I'd be hesitant to give it to my dog. However if the doc says so, keep this in mind. And long term antibiotics aren't good to take no matter who you are (two legger and four legger)

Janice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Hi Janice- I took him in to the vet becasue the tissue on his nose was losing pigment and starting to break down into ulcers that wouldn't heal.I hate giving him the tacrolimus (topical) which is an immune system suppresant, but his lesions are gone after only 4 days on it, so it did really help. He won't need the tetracycline now becasue the tacrolimus worked. I'm tring to fabricate a little shield for his nose rather than use sunscreen which is loaded with weird chemicals which I don't want him to ingest. Below is information from the article I linked in my first post- Murray has DLE which is manageable: I was relieved when his biopsy came back with this diagnosis rather than lymphoma or SLE.

Quote from the link in my first post: ( http://www.rr-oona.com/DLE/AI-DLE-eng.html )
"In people several forms of Lupus are recognized, two of these forms are also identified in dogs: Discoid Lupus Erythematosus (DLE) and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) ».
SLE is a severe, malignant and quite usually a lethal disorder (in dogs) in which the inappropriate immune response is widespread in the body both inside and outside. SLE may cause arthritis, kidney disease, anemia and skin disease.

"DLE is considered a benign and milder variant of SLE, and the lesions are confined to the skin. DLE is the second most common immune-mediate skin disease in the dog, and one of the most common skin disorders affecting the face.
Discoid Lupus is also the most common skin disorders that are exacerbated by sunlight (UV-radiation).
Discoid Lupus may have a waxing and waning course and therefore there may be times when medication is unnecessary.

Quite often DLE begins with loss of pigmentation of the planum nasale (nose) or on the lips. For example, a normally black nose may acquire partly slate-blue, grey or pink colour. The typical moist and cobblestone surface of the nose becomes dry and smooth and the depigmented lesions progresses into destruction of the tissue.
Prognosis for Discoid Lupus is usually good, although treatment must usually be continued for life.

In some rare, chronic cases, DLE may develop into a malignant squamous cell carcinoma, especially if the disorder is left untreated or there have been severe sunburns. And at least those ca. 5 % of DLE-dogs whose ANA test is positive, are in risk that the disease progresses to SLE."
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top