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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all

My basset baby Daisy Mae, Does not like to walk on the wet grass. She is only four months old, we have had her less than a week. Her first few days her bathroom habits were excellent(during warm and dry weather) now that the rain has come and the grass is wet she refuses to walk on the grass, I have to physically carry her to the grass, and it is a struggle to get her to stay n the grass to do her business. Any suggestions?
What kind of collar should I use to walk her? A harness? or just a normal collar.

I have been told that I should NEVER walk her on pavement because she is too young and that it could hurt her bone growth, how much truth is there to that?

Lastly for now how long a walk is good for her distance wise? Is a small city block too far for her to go?

Thanks
Andra
 

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Can't help you with the walking questions but know that they will be along to help. As far as the wet grass....Barney has always hated the wetness of it and he's two now. He'll go out but not very far...but....if I start acting like a crazed woman and run around, dance, etc., he'll come out and forget about how uncomfortable he is. Once he's out, everything is ok...As far as the collar/harness question, I opt for the harness. Barney's neck is very sensitive and when I had him in a collar, he would continually gag. I'd guess that half the people on here use collars, and half harnesses...so it's pretty much on how your dog reacts.
 

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i had a nice message typed up but i ignored the low power message and the computer shut down on me....yuck man

my hound hates getting wet but doesnt mind wet grass be it from rain or dew and usually comes back inside with nice wet ears afterwards. now rain thats another story the other day to get her to go outside when it was raining all day i threw a high value treat out in the yard. she didnt protest going out to get it and did her buisness before coming back inside.

harness vs collar there are lots of threads on the subject. i own both a buckle collar and harness and dont care for either but id probably give the edge to the harness. i use the harness for when i tie her out and the buckle when we go places. if i went out and bought a new one id go with a martingale collar. hounds can easily back out of the buckle collars.

never had a puppy so cant say anything about the truth of walking on concrete being harmful but i really cant see taking a puppy on a light walk as being harmful maybe start with 1/4 mi or your city block whichever is less. but take cues from your dog shewill probably let you know when she is done. i kinda remember there being a heated debate on walking or letting puppies play awhile back but i didnt keep up with it.

thats my few cents take em for what their worth. these forums are a good resource and everyone enjoys puppy photos!
 

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How long a walk:

On my first walk with my partner, we walked until I got tired, and resisted to go further.

Out came some little box that he talked into, and the wife magically showed up with a car to take us home.

Next walk was half the distance from the house of the first walk, then back home, with no need to call for a ride. We increased our distance a little eack walk.

We can now go almost two miles out, but, don't forget to allow time for the smelling. You may walk for the exercise, but we walk for the smells!
 

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one of ours, aka "her royal highness" does not like the feel of a wet blade of grace on her royal butt.

I just stand there and swoosh her back out until she produces.
 

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Neither of mine seem to mind wet grass, or even a true downpour. They will go out in about anything. It is getting them back in and dried off before they cuddle is our issue. They seem to think snuggles from a wet hound is a "good thing"....UMmm not so much!

If we get more than 2" of snow, then we have an issue. I guess with Jake I can understand, dragging his "boy parts" thru the snow cant be fun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, guess I will try the treat thing and do the crazywoman thing. Now my neighbors have even more to talk about. What a great place to learn that this is turning into
 

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I tried to walk one during a tropical storm in St. Pete. The rain kind of goes one then off as feeder bands come across. You try to walk them during lulls because the rain comes in horrendous sheets.
Got caught outside because he took too long sniffing. It just caught us like a shower in full blast. He decides to walk home by walking underneath a row of hedges all the way back. It doesn't really keep him dry, makes it take twice as long, and I have never worn clothes that soaked before.

All because a basset didn't want to get rained on. I've got the leash in one hand, and I'm holding up my sweatpants with the other because they were so heavy with water they wouldn't stay up.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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Hello all

My basset baby Daisy Mae, Does not like to walk on the wet grass. She is only four months old, we have had her less than a week. Her first few days her bathroom habits were excellent(during warm and dry weather) now that the rain has come and the grass is wet she refuses to walk on the grass, I have to physically carry her to the grass, and it is a struggle to get her to stay n the grass to do her business. Any suggestions?
What kind of collar should I use to walk her? A harness? or just a normal collar.

I have been told that I should NEVER walk her on pavement because she is too young and that it could hurt her bone growth, how much truth is there to that?

Lastly for now how long a walk is good for her distance wise? Is a small city block too far for her to go?
I honestly :p don't want to stir the hornets nest again re how much when it comes to Bassets and for sure, I have to stress that common sense with the Basset puppy involved, should be used but for me, I come from the school of no organised exercise before 6 months and then from 6 months to a year, gradually increase the amount, to give the muscle tone a chance to develop so that heavy bone is supported. I'd suggest a 'small city block' may be okay, with reservations. If she digs her heels in, then don't push it. I much prefer to let a puppy of under 6 months have free ambling around, again rather than organised walking on hard ground.

Puppy collar - I personally don't think Bassets and harnesses work. Again it depends on your individual hound but my big male has a wide collar - probably about an inch wide to begin with, and wider now. He's also on a slip collar for control much as he is generally well-behaved on the lead.

Can't really help you with the wet grass, other than to say keep at it - she's got to get used to 'going' on all surfaces really.
 

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Exercise in Puppies-Are there rules? | The SkeptVet Blog
"There are many dogmatic opinions available from veterinarians, pet owners, breeders and others concerning a common question owners of new puppies have, How much exercise is ok for puppies? This is an especially pertinent question for owners of large breed puppies, since these breeds have a higher incidence than others of developmental orthopedic disorders such as hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, and cartilage abnormalities known as osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD). As is all too often the case, however, these opinions generally lack solid scientific evidence to support them. Very little is known about the precise risks and benefits of different types and intensities of exercise in growing animals

...The research evidence, then, really does not provide anything like a definitive answer to questions about the effects of exercise in growing puppies. Common sense suggests that forcing a dog to exercise heavily when it does not wish to is not a good idea. Likewise, puppies sometimes have more enthusiasm than sense and can exercise to the point of heat exhaustion, blistered footpads, and other damage that may be less obvious. Therefore, a general principle of avoiding forced or voluntary extreme exercise is reasonable, but specific and absolute statements about what kind of exercise is allowed, what surfaces puppies should or should not exercise on, and so forth is merely opinion not supported by objective data. Such opinions may very well be informed by personal experience, and they may be reliable, but any opinion not founded on objective data must always be taken with a grain of salt and accepted provisionally until such data is available."


The idea that running and walking on hard surfaces are worse for the joints are steeped in myth and right now the scientific evidence does not support the myth Running injury exercises - myths about running injuries | Sports Injury Bulletin

"Briefly, an even better study carried out at Stanford University determined that disabling problems in the legs were five times as likely to occur in sedentary individuals, compared to athletes who engaged in running. Shockingly, the Stanford researchers' data ran against the idea that more running meant more injury, finding that running 15 miles per week cut muscular and skeletal problems by 60%, compared with running five miles per week or less (Anderson, O, 'What's the Truth about Running and Bad Knees?' Running Research News, Vol. 11(8), pp. 10-12, October 1995).
The lesson? If you want your legs to fall apart, your best strategy is to do nothing. If you become sedentary, your leg muscles and bones will decline in function at a rather brisk and predictable rate. Despite what you may hear from the chattering classes, banging your bones and joints around a bit ends up protecting them, instead of wearing them down.


...Some other myths are equally indestructible. For example, a common belief is that running on very hard surfaces (like concrete, cold Tarmac, terrazzo, etc) creates a higher risk of injury, compared to running on relatively soft terrain. Scientific research actually provides little support for this view (Feehery, RV Jr, 'The Bio-mechanics of Running on Different Surfaces,' Clin Podiatr Med Surg, Vol. 3(4), pp. 649-659,

...In an extremely interesting recent study (Ferris, DP, Louie, M, and Farley, CT, 'Running in the Real World: Adjusting Leg Stiffness for Different Surfaces,' Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci, Vol. 265 (1400), pp. 989-994, June 7, 1998), researchers at the University of California at Berkeley hypothesised that all running animals coordinate the actions of the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in their legs so that the overall leg behaves like a single, mechanical spring during ground contact. The Berkeley data suggests that the stiffness of this 'leg spring' is somewhat independent of running speed but is highly dependent on running surface, changing dramatically as an animal encounters surfaces of different stiffnesses. If this were not true, peak ground-reaction force and ground contact time (footstrike time) would change dramatically as an animal ran on different surfaces, but instead they remain fairly constant. "


 

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1.so basial walking or running on hard surface lead to joint problems vs soft surfaces is not proven and likely false.

2. a lack of exercise is worse on the joint than exercise.

3. common sense should prevail those most likely to end up with a sports related injury are the "weekend Warriors" ie those that are sedentary for weeks at a time then go out and over do it.
 

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the most like surface to lead to problems in doggy skeletal development are slippery ones so providing carpet or other higher traction surface for youngish puppies is important.
 
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