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Hello all. I have been following the boards for about a year, but always had problems with the site when I tried to sign up. I am so excited to finally be able to post. Here is my dilemma. About a year ago we got our first Basset, Olive. We went through a backyard breeder. I have now seen that when you buy a cheap dog you can get some very expensive problems. Although she is a fantastic dog (love of my life) she has had some health issues that I think could have been avoided by going through a reputable breeder.

My husband and I are now looking at getting a second Basset, and we really would like another puppy. Here's the problem. All the breeders I have found you are reserving a puppy before it is even born. Everything I have read says to make sure two dogs are compatible before adding a new dog to the household. Does anyone have any input on adding a new basset without an introduction to your current dog? Thanks for any help!
 

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You're correct that most reputable breeders (in my experience) have their puppies sold before they're even born. I suppose I should insert my normal plug of suggesting that if you want dogs to be introduced before you bring them home but don't want to purchase from a less than reputable breeder to consider rescuing a young basset instead. Most rescues allow and many even require an introduction. Some will allow you to foster a dog for a trial period. Either way, all reputable breeders and rescues should allow (and prefer) that you bring a dog back to them should things not work out.
 

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My husband and I are now looking at getting a second Basset, and we really would like another puppy. Here's the problem. All the breeders I have found you are reserving a puppy before it is even born. Everything I have read says to make sure two dogs are compatible before adding a new dog to the household. Does anyone have any input on adding a new basset without an introduction to your current dog? Thanks for any help!
I know a couple of really good Basset breeders (including our pups' breeder) who aren't into breeding for the money, and occasionally breed when they want new show stock, otherwise they don't breed until they have several people who have their names down for pups, so you may have to add your name to a list and wait for a really good pup! Why not keep your eye open for one that is between 1 and 2 years old who needs a home?
 

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Making sure the two are compatible is generally more of an issue when bringing home an adult dog. Puppies are generally compatible with just about anybody, so the question is mainly whether your current dog is compatible with a puppy. Talk to the breeders you're interested in about your concerns - everybody has a different policy but it's quite possible that they would let your dog meet the puppy before you commit to taking it home.
 

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Puppies are generally compatible with just about anybody, so the question is mainly whether your current dog is compatible with a puppy.
This is very true! We waited to get Virga until we saw how gentle Doppler was around one of our friend's puppy. He was like a gentle giant. And when we got Virga it didn't take long for him to figure out he had to lay down to stop from hurting her accidentally with his big ol' feet.
 

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Does anyone have any input on adding a new basset without an introduction to your current dog? Thanks for any help!
There is no reason when reserving a dog you can not have a introduction at a nuetral site after as well.

Am I the only one that cringes when there is an eight week old puppy in the "Aggression" section???

How old was your pup when you got him?

Your puppy does not yet understand that he needs to respect an older dog. EVERYTHING is play to him right now. He is trying to engage your older dog in play. THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH SEX.

Why the older dog is letting him, is because MOST dogs respect the puppy license. Both in the wild and domestic dogs, older pack members allow a puppy to do just about anything up to a certain age and then they start disciplining the puppy. [/quote]

Making sure the two are compatible is generally more of an issue when bringing home an adult dog. Puppies are generally compatible with just about anybody, so the question is mainly whether your current dog is compatible with a puppy
To futher elabriate. Puppies have what is commonly refferred to as Puppy Liciense untill about 16+ weeks of age until the sex hormones kick in. Which Means that adult dogs give them wide lattitude in acting obnoxious without correcting them. If an adult does not do this there is a problem with the adult not the puppy. Hence less concern when bring a puppy home. Form more details on puppy liecense see.

Social Hierarchies
[quoteThe termination of this 'puppy license' is cued by rising testosterone levels in male pups at four- to five-months of age, which reach a peak around 10 months (4-5 ng/ml) before declining to adult levels (1-2 ng/ml). When puppies approached adolescence, they were continually harassed by adult dogs. Male adolescents were especially targeted by adult males. This stressful phase of social development is mercifully short, because the pups quickly learn to display active and exaggerated appeasement in order to allay harassment by adults, i.e., the pups learn their station in life before they become serious competition on the social scene[/url]

The Puppy License and its loss
Puppies up to 4 ½ to 5 months of age appear to have something called a ‘puppy license’ – something that allows them to be an absolute pest to older dogs without repercussion. You see puppies being down right rude in dog terms doing things like jumping on older dogs, stealing food and toys from adults, barking right in the face of an adult or worse still humping them – and the adults just seem to put up with it, and even expect it – at least well socialised dogs do (dogs with good dog communication and social skills).

However at about this age the license expires as the puppies hormone levels change and they develop psychologically. Adult dogs now start to insist on the puppy controlling their behaviour and being more respectful in their interactions – and this comes as a shock to many puppies who ignore the more subtle signs until an adult dog (maybe their best pal at home, a friend at the park or a total stranger) snaps back – figuratively and sometimes literally.
Puppy license and adult behavior–STOP SEPARATING PLAY.

8 week old puppy attempting to dominate adult male
 

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Am I the only one that cringes when there is an eight week old puppy in the "Aggression" section???
I also cannot believe that any Basset puppy has an ounce of aggression in it and find it quite upsetting wondering what has happened to Bassets if I read such stuff about them being aggressive! :(

Personally I have never seen any aggression at all in any of our Bassets, or friends' Bassets and (no disrespect to anyone on this forum) but I often wonder if it is because they live in an 'aggressive' home that they sometimes become aggressive as I have never seen it myself, it fact, COMPLETELY the opposite is true of my hounds... as docile as they come, even when we have rehomed older Bassets we've seen no aggression ever!
 

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I also cannot believe that any Basset puppy has an ounce of aggression in it and find it quite upsetting wondering what has happened to Bassets if I read such stuff about them being aggressive!
FWIW the board linked to was a GSD (german shepherd dog) board but in any case it was an owner mis-interpreting the behavior of a puppy and an adults tolerance of such behavior that would not occur if it were another adult dog.

FWIW most aggression can be linked to fear and such fear is often or most often related to a lack of early socialization and habituation. It is one reason many breeders insist on keeping the puppies longer to insure they get the proper socialization and hibituation at a critical life stage so they have less chance of having to deal with the problem later in life. Most aggression is behavioral in nature not organic/genetic and as such can be prevented in the first place. But if not done so early it is very diffucult to correct latter in life.
 

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Good info all around. Thanks guys. My main concern is with our current dog. We got her as a puppy, but she was about 16 weeks and not socialized properly when she was younger. She doesn't seem to get dog communication very well.

We recently dog sat an older dog for ten days. With olive it was all play all the time and she didn't seem to read when Maslow wanted to be left alone. Most of Olives dog interaction has been with our friend's dogs who are all puppies like her and much larger dogs (Danes, Mastiffs, and Greyhounds). They have a tendency to play pretty ruff. I am concerned with how she will behave with the new little one. Maybe I should just give up on the idea of a puppy.
 

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If you're not completely set on the idea of adopting a puppy I still strongly suggest considering taking in an adult basset that's looking for a home. There is a fair amount of work involved with making sure they get along and sorting out any issues that may arise but in my experience it's nowhere near the amount of work involved in training and socializing a puppy from scratch, depending on the dog of course (some will be tougher cases, some will fit right in from the get-go). Bassets are a pretty popular breed so finding one in a rescue, even a non-breed specific one, is not too difficult. Many breeders may have adults looking for homes as well.

For example, there is one at the shelter I adopted Anabelle from right now: Petfinder Adoptable Dog | Basset Hound | Carrollton, TX | Penelope


I adopt nothing but rescues now so obviously I am biased though.
 
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