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One of my dogs gets mildly carsick on long trips, especially if they involve a lot of stopping and starting, and rough roads. This is a problem for dog shows, since most of them are a couple of hours from here. Anybody have any ideas on how to treat this that isn't sedating? I have a friend with a Border Collie that has the same problem, and he just sticks very close to home to showI remember using Dramamine for a hound years ago who *really* got sick, but it also made him very sleepy. Right now, all I've come up with is driving with the back windows partly down. B-r-r-r.
 

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One of my dogs gets mildly carsick on long trips, especially if they involve a lot of stopping and starting, and rough roads. This I've come up with is driving with the back windows partly down. B-r-r-r.[/b]
Many dogs that get car sick often are looking out the side window or to the rear of the vehicle. The visual cues to not match the inner and voila motion sickness. Limiting what a dog can see while driving has hekped many Try crating the dog and covering the crate.
 

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Many dogs that get car sick often are looking out the side window or to the rear of the vehicle. The visual cues to not match the inner and voila motion sickness. Limiting what a dog can see while driving has hekped many Try crating the dog and covering the crate.[/b]
Thanks. My dogs ride in harnesses, because my car isn't big enough for two crates. You're right--they are looking out the side window. Do you think covering the window with a towel would help?
 

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Our Sally has a mild case, sounds like your pup. She is OK if she faces forward and can look out the window. We had to rig a platform for her in our RV to elevate her enough. We anchor it to several steel supports that attach the seats to the floor, and have her in a harness. After some trial and error, it works fine. We tried crating her facing forward, but it didn't work. She has to be able to look out. We still stop frequently to give her a rest. Daisy, our other basset, sleeps for hours at a time when traveling. As soon as we get going, she becomes nearly comatose until we stop for a break, then back to sleep. :)
 

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Sharon, it works for me. I am the carsick queen of New England and am miserable when I'm not driving. I have to sit in the front and look dead ahead if I can't get my scopalamine patch. It's nuts. I imagine it's the same things for all animals, so try it and see how you do. Good luck!!!!
 

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Sharon, it works for me. I am the carsick queen of New England and am miserable when I'm not driving. I have to sit in the front and look dead ahead if I can't get my scopalamine patch. It's nuts. I imagine it's the same things for all animals, so try it and see how you do. Good luck!!!![/b]
Thanks everybody--
But is it safe to put dogs in the front seat, even with the harness? I would think they'd be at the same risk as kids, due to their size.
 

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My husband and I take an 8 hour round trip journey every Saturday because we live in SC and we're building in NC. The first trip we took Lucy and Rupert on they did great. Slept most of the time. Every trip since they have both thrown up. Anyone know of motion sickness medicine for pups?? I've read that some dogs get used to travelling and just stop. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated!! :wub:
 

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My husband and I take an 8 hour round trip journey every Saturday because we live in SC and we're building in NC. The first trip we took Lucy and Rupert on they did great. Slept most of the time. Every trip since they have both thrown up. Anyone know of motion sickness medicine for pups?? I've read that some dogs get used to travelling and just stop. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated!! :wub:[/b]

You may want to consider ginger

Univerisity Medical Center on motion sickness
Several studies suggest that ginger may be more effective than placebo in reducing symptoms associated with motion sickness. For example, in one clinical trial of 80 novice sailors (prone to motion sickness), those who took ginger (in powder form) experienced a significant reduction in vomiting and cold sweating compared to those who took placebo. Similar results were found in a study with healthy volunteers. While these results are promising, other studies suggest that ginger is not as effective as medications in reducing symptoms associated with motion sickness. In a small study of volunteers who were given ginger (fresh root and powder form), scopolamine, or placebo, those receiving the medication demonstrated a significant reduction in symptoms compared to those who received ginger. More rigorous trials are needed to confirm the effectiveness of ginger for motion sickness.[/b]
 

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"Sharon, it works for me. I am the carsick queen of New England and am miserable when I'm not driving. I have to sit in the front and look dead ahead if I can't get my scopalamine patch. It's nuts. I imagine it's the same things for all animals, so try it and see how you do. Good luck!!!!

Beverly Anne,

If you can't get you patch, have you tried eating green apples, (ie, Granny Smith?) My sister was on a rather rough cruise one year. The waiter at dinner noticed she was looking a bit peaked, brought her a couple granny smith apple which did the trick. I've suffered from carsickness since I was a kid. Now I wouldn't consider taking a trip without eating one before leaving. I can even read or do needlework in the car, whereas before I'd just sleep.

Barb

P.S. Never tried it with the girls, though.
 
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