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ok...recently, we asked someone to puppy sit for our basset, but while we were away, our flight was cancelled and we spent two extra days away from home. our puppy-sitter turned out to be a bit undependable, because she returned our dog to our home a day before we could get there. of course, nobody could blame him for making messes all over the house...but since then, every morning, there is another puddle to clean up. i've started waking up at 2 am to let him out after just four hours of sleep, but he is going even before i can get there. he's not a young dog; we've had him for a year since he came to us from off the street. we crate trained him when we first got him, and he was doing fine. he doesn't have accidents when we are at work from 7:30 - 4:30, so what's the deal with the peeing on the carpet every night? we've started crating him again, because it seems like he's forgotten that he's supposed to go outside, but our cat (his best buddy) hates it when he's locked up and howls and scratches at the door all night now.

we thought about taking away his water after bedtime, but we don't want to do anything that will be bad for him. anyway, when we put the water bowl in the "cat's room," behind a babygate...he ate the babygate, drank all the water, and went kitty-litter diving. that was worse than just peeing.

i just want to get a decent night's sleep and a clean carpet!

also, a somewhat unrelated issue...he drinks so much and so fast that he throws up. more messes. it's getting to the point where we're thinking of tearing out the carpet and putting down laminate flooring just to make the cleanup easier.

anyone else go through this?
 

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It is not unusal for a dog of any breed to "lose" it housetraining after such an incident. the only solution is to retrain the dog like you did when he was younger fortunately it is faster and easier the second or more times.

we thought about taking away his water after bedtime, but we don't want to do anything that will be bad for him.
provided he is of normal health ie does not have any medical issues, restricting access to water at night is not harmful. It may help but that is doubtfull

we crate trained him when we first got him, and he was doing fine. he doesn't have accidents when we are at work from 7:30 - 4:30, so what's the deal with the peeing on the carpet every night? we've started crating him again, because it seems like he's forgotten that he's supposed to go outside, but our cat (his best buddy) hates it when he's locked up and howls and scratches at the door all night now.
Something to think about Cats are nocturnal, Dog general adjust there paterns to that of the household. If the cat and dog are playing at night while you are asleep it could be a major cause of the accident. In dogs as with any mammal activity increases the rate urine is produces. An adult dog can easily sleep 8 hours Like when you leave the house for work 8 hours without needing to go. But if he is active at night he could need to go as frequently as every our or two if and adult even more frequently if a puppy.


we're thinking of tearing out the carpet and putting down laminate flooring just to make the cleanup easier.
never a bad idea and generally heathier too, but keep in mind not all laminate is the same. Most are not tollerant of liquids stand for proglonged period at the seem. This can easily happen if accidents are occur at night. You definately need a high cost high quality laminate to stand up to that or some of the resiliant (vinyl flooring) that can look like wood or tile.


he drinks so much and so fast that he throws up
this a problem for more than a few bassets.
 

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When I read your post the first thing that the excessive urination and thirst brought to mind was diabetes. Is that a common problem in hounds? I know of a lot of kitties who have suffered through it but I am not sure if i've ever heard of a diabetic dog.
 

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When I read your post the first thing that the excessive urination and thirst brought to mind was diabetes. Is that a common problem in hounds? I know of a lot of kitties who have suffered through it but I am not sure if i've ever heard of a diabetic dog.
It's a similar problem in dogs, as well, though I don't know how common it is.
 

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It wouldn't hurt to have him checked over by the vet to rule out a medical cause, such as a UTI.
 

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I think diabetes is more prevelent in cats than in dogs. In all cases including humans being overweight is a contributing factor.

Nestlé Purina study confirms link between body fat, certain health conditions
Researchers discovered that excess body fat reduces insulin sensitivity, which inhibits the ability of cells to absorb glucose quickly and efficiently. Glucose and insulin left in the bloodstream can hinder the ability of organs, tissues and body systems to function properly, which can result in the development of some chronic health conditions.
"The significance of the latest published information is what we've learned about the lifetime effects of impaired glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity," says Brian T. Larson, Ph.D., Nestlé Purina nutrition research scientist and lead author of the article Improved Glucose Tolerance with Lifetime Diet Restriction Favorably Affects Disease and Survival in Dogs.
 
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