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Hey everyone,

I have a 4 year old basset that was rehomed to me at 1 year old. She is so sweet and beautiful and I truly love her. However, she has not stopped peeing in my house for the last 3 years. She will go weeks without an accident and then weeks where she doesn't go more than an hour between peeing in the house, and multiple times a day. Sometimes she pees on the floor, other times on my furniture. She usually does not let us know she has to go out, and just pees on the floor. I have read so many blogs and advice columns about housebreaking and specifically bassets, but no luck. I haven't had any issue housebreaking a dog before, so I'm not sure what else to try. She in not fixed, and some people say that can contribute to this problem, but I'm not sure.

We have tried:
-crating, which she would just urinate and lay in it
-positive praise
-confining to a small room in the house, so there was more space then a crate
-buying special products to cover up her scent
-rewards, like new toys for doing well
-scheduled potty breaks
-taking her on walks alone, so she gets separate time from my other dog and children
-watching for ques that she needs to go

I know people say that dogs don't do this due to behavioral issues, but I'm not sure what else it could be since it comes in phases. While my husband likes the dog, he doesn't want to keep living with a dog that pees in our house, and I can't blame him. I desperately want to get this remedied so she and my family can all enjoy living together.

Thanks for any advice!

P.S.- she can also be food aggressive, and has bit my children as well as me, which makes me think there's some behavioral issues going on in general.
 

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Have you completely ruled out health problems?

If your dog is 100% healthy, unfortunately with stubborn dogs, it’s a battle of persistence. Your list looks quite comprehensive, it’s usually a combination of those things


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The first thing that's missing from your list of 'have tried' is a trip to the vet with a sample of her urine, fresh. You can't attempt to correct this before you KNOW she doesn't have a medical reason for what's going on. From UTI to bladder stones. If she has a clean bill of health, you move on to YOU dictating when she goes out - rather than waiting for her to ask you. I'd suggest the reason she was out of her original home was because nobody got to grips with housetraining, so she basically has no real concept of not messing where she feels the need, indoors or out. And messing in her crate might suggest this too - adult dogs, who should be able to hold, don't normally mess where they sleep.


The good part about having a bitch as opposed to a dog, is bitches normally completely empty when they urinate - dogs tend to hold something back to mark.


If a bitch is spayed young, it can lead to spay incontinence, but if she's entire, that doesn't apply - what does is the fact that when in, or coming into season, a bitch will 'mark' - spread it around for any local roaming male to scent. I'd get her spayed, asap. Talk to your vet about that.


As for the biting - this is serious. She's resource guarding and again that could go back to her previous. She could well have been teased when eating - once the bowl goes down LEAVE HER ALONE TO EAT UP! And feed her somewhere quiet - keeping the kids well away. Obviously no dog should ever nip, especially I might say, the gentle Basset, but again this is, I'd suspect, down to what went on in her previous home poor dear. Observe the situations that produce this reaction...... and AVOID/PREVENT!


So 1. You get her urine checked by your vet to rule out a medical problem
2. YOU dictate when to get her out to pee, erring on the side of more often at first - the more she can pee indoors, the longer this is going to take to correct
3. Observe and prevent re situations she's not happy with.


Good luck!
 

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"As for the biting - this is serious'"


MUCH more serious then the housetraining. Given she does not have bite inhibition and is one of the few things you can not reliably teach an older dog.
 

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The first thing that came to mind when I read about the urination problem is a probable UTI. Everyone else has brought up potential medical issues and I think that's on the mark (in other words, see a vet). Except where bringing in a urine sample will be useless, my vet wants a fresh, uncontaminated sample (usually involves drawing out with syringe straight from the bladder).

My boys occasionally get UTI and when that happens, accidents happen...

And when accidents happen, the scent left behind in that spot/area is a green light for them to go there again. You must clean that spot with enzyme cleaners incredibly thoroughly as they have incredible sense of smell. I can't stress enough how important it is to completely erase all evidence of their mess inside the home (I've posted about this before).

Regarding the food aggression, on of the brothers (I have two boys, brothers) has food aggression. He's an asshole to his brother over food, particularly when tired and cranky from chasing rabbits all day. I solved that by having multiple food dishes out and spread far apart so the aggressor can't cover all bowls at once.

I also found by keeping out plenty of food all the time helps. I believe much of the aggression comes into play when it's perceived that the food is a limited resource. If there's always food available, there's really not much sense in protecting it (but he still does to some degree).

I can get away with unlimited food access since they get tons of exercise on weekends.

Otherwise, it's a pretty tough problem to deal with.

One solution is to not interfere with a dog and his/her food. Teach children to leave the dog alone when feeding. Allow the dog privacy when eating.
 

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Except where bringing in a urine sample will be useless, my vet wants a fresh, uncontaminated sample (usually involves drawing out with syringe straight from the bladder).

I can get away with unlimited food access since they get tons of exercise on weekends.

I have always collected urine myself when necessary, to avoid the need to either catheterise or use a syringe - either way risking introducing infection. IF my vet(s) had ever had to introduce a catheter (same with a syringe) to obtain a sample, it would mean a course of abs.


I have NEVER free fed - ie leaving food out 24/7 other than leaving a shallow dish of dry kibble for puppies overnight, in the whelping box and after mum had stopped sleeping with them. When we were running numbers, it was a case of calling each hound, in the same order, and putting their bowl down in the same place or there would have been chaos. And as we started getting 'oldies' who perhaps didn't eat up as fast as the others, I had to be right there to make sure there was no bowl swapping going on. Again if I hadn't watched, there would have been trouble. Besides with free-feeding, how would you know how much each hound is eating, until the hound started putting on too much weight?
 

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I have always collected urine myself when necessary, to avoid the need to either catheterise or use a syringe - either way risking introducing infection. IF my vet(s) had ever had to introduce a catheter (same with a syringe) to obtain a sample, it would mean a course of abs.
My vet won't accept samples collected by me. Always insists on getting fresh.

I have NEVER free fed - ie leaving food out 24/7 other than leaving a shallow dish of dry kibble for puppies overnight, in the whelping box and after mum had stopped sleeping with them. When we were running numbers, it was a case of calling each hound, in the same order, and putting their bowl down in the same place or there would have been chaos. And as we started getting 'oldies' who perhaps didn't eat up as fast as the others, I had to be right there to make sure there was no bowl swapping going on. Again if I hadn't watched, there would have been trouble. Besides with free-feeding, how would you know how much each hound is eating, until the hound started putting on too much weight?
I've always fed dogs with open bowls. Never had an issue with an overweight dog. I do the same with cats, even they haven't gotten overweight and since they are indoor, they really don't get much exercise.

I read that Bassets tend to gorge, so I kept an eye on the guys at first. Even initially doled out food sparingly, but that lead to food aggression.

My boys get plenty of exercise so I'm not worried about excessive weight (they run around 20 miles on a typical weekend). Not yet, anyway, they just turned 4. I keep an eye on their weight in any case as I understand it's a common issue with Bassets.

Oh, and I NEVER feed my dogs table scraps. They don't even try to ask for scraps. I'm guessing most overweight dogs eat a lot more than just dog food.
 

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"That kind of training, with a BASSET bothers me because I see it as 'teasing'."


Hmmm then As the dog wait at an open door way before going out too is teasing? Having the dog sit while you prepare his food bowl is teasing? really?

thn I would imagine you are against tug of war with dogs because it is "teasing as Well"

You need to rethink your definition of teasing.

It is a game with clearly defined rules that dgs figure out pretty quickly. If it were teasing there would not be a behavior the dogs could use consistently to alway get the treat . that is what teasing is show the dog food but never having means of them ever to get it. The difference between teasing and
training is so huge I can not conceive how anyone would consider them remotely the same.
 

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"Not yet, anyway, they just turned 4. I keep an eye on their weight in any "


I have one that you could free feed without a problem and others that would put on 20 lbs in a single day. It is an individual thing but the breed does have more of a tendency to the latter.


Imho much of increase in certain health issues is the demonization of healthy whole foods and variety in a dogs diet with "table Scraps" are bad for dogs. On the contrast feeding the same High carbohydrate highly processed diet that kibble represent is well known to be sub optimal at best. More convenient certainly but sub optimal none the less.
 

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"That kind of training, with a BASSET bothers me because I see it as 'teasing'."


Hmmm then As the dog wait at an open door way before going out too is teasing? Having the dog sit while you prepare his food bowl is teasing? really?

thn I would imagine you are against tug of war with dogs because it is "teasing as Well"

You need to rethink your definition of teasing.

It is a game with clearly defined rules that dgs figure out pretty quickly. If it were teasing there would not be a behavior the dogs could use consistently to alway get the treat . that is what teasing is show the dog food but never having means of them ever to get it. The difference between teasing and
training is so huge I can not conceive how anyone would consider them remotely the same.

Each to their own Mikey - just because you don't see this as teasing, and I do, doesn't make me wrong!!! :p



FWIW. Mine don't have to wait at an open door - the door isn't opened (front door) unless my hounds are behind the shut door to the living room and the back door is always open in good weather for them to come and go at will. Mine don't sit while waiting to be fed - they stand quietly (usually). I have never done tug of war with mine, for various other reasons. I 'train' without what I happen to see as teasing!! :cool:
 
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