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Discussion Starter #1
What's up with breeder shaming? Even towards responsible breeders? It seems like nowadays, unless you are rescuing a dog, people look down upon you and try to shame you in some instances.

I work with a woman who is a HUGE animal rescuer. She is aware I have 2 AKC Bassets and that one if them is currently pregnant, and she constantly tries to drop passive-aggressive hints that she "disapproves" (like I give a [email protected]). She will randomly make remarks like, "You know, I told my husband we weren't going to get an AKC dog. They're all inbred anyway," and things to that effect.

Before I acquired my 2 from breeders in Georgia (US), I tried to adopt a basset from the Atlanta Basset Hound Rescue. For 7 MONTHS I tried with them. Filled out the application. Kept up correspondence with whoever it is that runs the rescue. Sent pictures and videos of my home and surrounding land. Made phone call check-ups. Scheduled "home visits" that were cancelled. They would ask me which bassets on their site I was interested in. I would always give them about 5 or 6 I would take. I was always met with a response of how that particular dog would "probably not be a good fit for me," but was never given a reason why. Finally, I threw in the towel and just went to a breeder and got one of their retired ones to have as a pet companion (Agnes, 7.5 yrs). In the meantime, I became interested in the breeding and I acquired a puppy soon after (my Georgette who is now almost 2 and pregnant). I honestly think these rescues are "picky" to a fault and it seems to me that they are very political in who they allow to adopt dogs. With me, they missed out on placing a needy dog in a GREAT home. Both of my basset girls have THE LIFE. They go on vacations with us, ride in the car, have fenced in land to roam, can be inside when they want, go to the vet regularly, are fed well, and get plenty of attention.

If I had gotten one from the rescue, it would have been spayed/neutered, I would have had my little companion pet, and I never would have gone to a breeder for one. And certainly would not be giving breeding a shot like I am now. In a way, I feel like the rescue inadvertently led to me going to a breeder and becoming one myself. I wonder how true this is for others.

(Side note: I am only breeding mine the one time. We do not foresee it coming a regular business for us.)

Also, does anyone have any comebacks for people who breeder shame? So far, I tell people who say, "You should rescue. There are so many dogs who need homes," that they should adopt children instead of having their own because so many children don't have homes. That's all I have, though. :huh:
 

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and the other side of the coin the Real horror that are creeping into animal rescue.

https://animallaw.foxrothschild.com/2014/05/20/the-phenomenon-called-retail-rescue/

With Rescue Dogs In Demand, More Shelters Look Far Afield For Fido : NPR
"ust north of Boston, the Northeast Animal Shelter is one of the largest private shelters in New England. Founded in the 1970s, it went through a big expansion about six years ago, building a new, 13,000-square-foot shelter with three isolation rooms.

The rooms were designed to house the increasing number of dogs the shelter transports from other states and Puerto Rico.

...In several parts of the country, shelters now import dogs for adoption from other regions — even other countries. That has veterinarians, and even some pet rescue groups, concerned about what some call "dog trafficking."


But some states, like Connecticut, do. In 2012, 14,000 animals were brought to Connecticut from other states, says Arnold Goldman, a veterinarian in Connecticut who has been concerned about the booming interstate movement of dogs. He says he has seen a lot of health issues, like mange and heartworm, as a result

...Rescue groups are finding unwanted dogs to transport in the South and in other countries, including Mexico, Taiwan and India — all countries where rabies is endemic in the dog population.

Strand says the concern about rabies is more than theoretical.

"We've had a dog with rabies come in from Iraq. One came in from India, [another from] Thailand. We've had a dog from Puerto Rico that wound up in a shelter in Massachusetts with rabies," she says.

In Massachusetts, Connecticut and some other states, regulations have been tightened in recent years to require rabies certificates and 48-hour quarantine periods for dogs arriving from outside the state.

But problems persist. A puppy transported to Vermont in 2013 and adopted by a family was euthanized after it developed rabies.

The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians has asked the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to ban the import of dogs from countries where rabies is endemic."

https://www.facebook.com/The-Truth-About-Retail-Rescue-1535728473361457/

Mission creep: Dog rescues and animal shelters risk public health and safety | National Animal Interest Alliance
"But that era may be drawing to a close, as a new ideology and the end of dog overpopulation in many parts of the country lead some not-for-profit humane organizations to abandon their missions and replace long-standing codes-of-conduct with irresponsible practices like:

placing dangerous dogs with the public;
placing pets without screening adopters;
placing sick dogs; and
participating in unregulated dog trafficking, the practice of moving literally thousands of dogs from high supply areas to areas that have solved or nearly solved their surplus dog problems.
Several trends have coalesced to cause this perversion of traditional rescue and sheltering, especially:

nearly universal pet sterilization and the associated decline in available puppies;
social pressure to adopt a shelter pet rather than buy a puppy from a breeder; and
defamation campaigns waged against breeders and pet stores.
This monumental – but largely unrecognized – ideological shift allows irresponsible groups to hide behind their charity image and operate as unregulated wholesale and retail pet marketers who exploit public concern for animal welfare while endangering public health and safety.

...A recent case in Stamford, Connecticut, a city that just fired their shelter director for placing known biters, highlights the risk. According to Connecticut News 12 reports, “Dogs described as ‘harmless’ in advertisements were often returned for biting people. Hollywood [the shelter director] then allegedly falsified documents, allowing dogs with a history of biting to be readopted. The dogs then bit their new owners.”

Unfortunately, the Stamford case is just the latest in a growing number of eerily similar situations where poor judgment and a lack of reasonable policies came together to injure or kill a member of the public. In 2003 in Newark, New Jersey, the Associated Humane Societies placed a dog that attacked and killed his new owner just 10 days after she adopted him. Investigations found that the dog had viciously attacked his previous owner and was surrendered to the shelter for euthanasia by the victim’s son"

Pet Adoption Becoming Money-Making Business? | NBC Connecticut

Retail Rescue At It's Finest. Sinking To New Lows Daily

https://4graceandtruth.wordpress.com/2015/12/11/real-rescue-or-retail-rescue-you-decide/
"These puppies are for sale at $1,850.00 from a “rescue”. Their moms were purchased with donated money at a dog auction! But they are “rescued”. Same dogs that are sold in the pet stores, for the same price, what is the difference?”
People on that Facebook page where these puppies were posted for “adoption” are just trying to understand and are also trying to get to the core of why dogs bought at a dog auction by a “rescue” USING donation money (not their own money) and then selling them for exorbitant adoption fees is any different then selling them retail besides that retail sales REQUIRE that buyers have to pay sales tax."
 

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Well, that is a topic and a half. It's a hard question to answer properly without coming off sounding like a conspiracy theory nut, but I suggest you start looking into the animal rights movement and how they are shaping our culture and our laws to make breeding and owning animals as difficult as possible, with the ultimate goal of eliminating all domestic animals and ending animal "slavery".
 

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The "Adopt Don?t Shop" Meme Debunked


NAIA study confirms fewer dogs, scarce purebreds in US animal shelters | National Animal Interest Alliance
he number of dogs entering US shelters has reached an all-time low, and the number of purebred dogs found in shelters has dropped to about 5%,

The study also identified several weaknesses in the U.S. animal protection movement, including the lack of transparency among non-profit shelters and inadequate or non-existent shelter regulation and oversight.

Strand said transparency and regulatory oversight have become more important as nonprofit pet shelters have increased their share of the pet dog market. The increased demand for shelter dogs, combined with the dwindling supply from local sources, has led to unprecedented levels of dog relocation and importation. "Today's shelters include everything from traditional facilities helping local animals to new, retail-style models that meet customer demand by importing dogs from other states, offshore territories and even foreign countries," she said. "Very few people realize the scope of these rescue/shelter import programs."

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 4 Northeastern states recently received more than 30 rescue dogs and cats from Egypt for adoption in the U.S., including one dog with rabies. “Importing dogs that may be infected with rabies, other zoonotic and/or infectious diseases puts American citizens and animals at risk of illness or death and should not be allowed,” Strand says.

Connecticut veterinarian and NAIA Board member Dr. Arnold Goldman, counsels that “even though relocating pets may feel good in the short run, it is a false, potentially dangerous and ultimately ineffective practice that does nothing to solve the problem of surplus dogs at the source. Improving animal wellbeing and solving animal welfare problems such as homeless animals must be addressed at the place where animals first interact with people, by the development of targeted programs in their cities, counties and states of origin.”
 

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Another interesting push I've seen from "animal rights activists" lately is them trying to pass local legislation where a "rescuer" cannot face criminal charges for breaking into a car to rescue an animal. While I certain agree that it is cruel to leave an animal unattended in a car for a length of time in the brutal summer heat, it has made me reluctant to even let my dogs ride in the car with me in the summer. I often take them with me while running errands, and any time I leave them in the car for 10 minutes or less, I get paranoid I am going to come back to a busted window and someone trying to tell me I am an animal abuser.

I was once told by a crazy animal rights activist that I should not let my bassets hang their heads out the window because their ears fluttering could cause "blood vessels to pop." I said, "Ma'am, if their blood vessels haven't popped from them tripping their 50 pounds of body weight over their ears, the air isn't going to do it." She walked off from me.
 

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Another interesting push I've seen from "animal rights activists" lately is them trying to pass local legislation where a "rescuer" cannot face criminal charges for breaking into a car to rescue an animal. While I certain agree that it is cruel to leave an animal unattended in a car for a length of time in the brutal summer heat, it has made me reluctant to even let my dogs ride in the car with me in the summer. I often take them with me while running errands, and any time I leave them in the car for 10 minutes or less, I get paranoid I am going to come back to a busted window and someone trying to tell me I am an animal abuser.

I was once told by a crazy animal rights activist that I should not let my bassets hang their heads out the window because their ears fluttering could cause "blood vessels to pop." I said, "Ma'am, if their blood vessels haven't popped from them tripping their 50 pounds of body weight over their ears, the air isn't going to do it." She walked off from me.
This is the reason I am extremely cautious about leaving the dogs in the van. I once left them, in the shade, windows open a safe amount, the van has tinted windows. I was gone less than 10 minutes (I set a timer to make sure I'm not gone too long). A woman had reached in and unlocked the doors, had the front door open and was halfway into the van. She threatened to call the cops on me. I told her to go ahead because I would have her charged with breaking and entering. If the dogs had gotten out because of her idiocy they could have been lost, injured or killed. They are in far more danger from would be "rescuers" than from being left in the van. After that I used the remote start to leave the van running and the AC on, so I could leave the windows up and the doors locked. Using the timer, I am never gone for more than 15 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The "Adopt Don?t Shop" Meme Debunked


NAIA study confirms fewer dogs, scarce purebreds in US animal shelters | National Animal Interest Alliance
he number of dogs entering US shelters has reached an all-time low, and the number of purebred dogs found in shelters has dropped to about 5%,

The study also identified several weaknesses in the U.S. animal protection movement, including the lack of transparency among non-profit shelters and inadequate or non-existent shelter regulation and oversight.


Thanks. I'm definitely going to be using some of this in the future. I'm tired of responsible breeding and responsible purebred pet ownership being slammed based on emotions and myths.
 

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Tri State Basset Rescue at one time perhaps the most highly regarded Basset rescue in the country was a major part of one of the biggest state sactioned animal kidnappings in the Country. The Founder and long Time breeder and Basset advocate Barbara Wickland

see threads on Murder Hollow Bassets in the Political and other threads beginning in 2009
http://www.basset.net/boards/basset-hound-politics/12020-rest-murder-hollow-bassets.html
 

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It depends on what's your definition of responsible breeding?
I also get fed up of breed owners being vilified, BUT also having read the number of problems here, on other forums, seen deformities (which are often dismissed), concerns within a large majority of the breed (whether through nature or nurture) & having managed 'daily' a much loved dog for the last 10 years that suffers from multiple problems, my idea of responsible breeding is perhaps more of a concern than to others.
Yes I've been told that no breeder can guarantee a wonderful pup, which is understandable, but my experience is that even well known, established 'reputable' breeders for 'whatever reason' ignore issues within their own lines & IMHO every dog, working, show or pet deserves a pain free healthy life.
It's vital for the health of any breed (lost count of the times I've heard or been told by owners that their pet dog died around 6 years) that anyone considering breeding knows the pedigree of their dog especially the health on both side going back through the previous generations, many issues will not present until maturity so if the knowledge & research isn't done, I'd call it irresponsible. Health testing, isn't just having a vet check the dog over, but having the knowledge of the breed, researching it's lines, having the dog tested & screened for known concerns some which are set out by the breed clubs & a mentor for assistance during pregnancy & whelping. There's also no certainty that a bitch will whelp without assistance, intervention is (costly) or worse.
So simply, if your bitch or it's mate has nothing to enhance the present gene pool, & by some of the comments posted recently I'm left wondering at the basic knowledge of reproduction, I'd say leave well alone. We live in a consumer society where we expect & want things now, I'm looking for a pup to join us in the future & it's a difficult choice.


This sums it up better than I can, just change BYB to Casual or irresponsible.


<<The backyard breeder is the single greatest cause of pet overpopulation. Backyard breeders usually do not have bad intentions, but the results of back yard breeding are devastating. The majority of purebred dogs come from this category in many popular breeds, as well as the majority of purebred dogs in rescue, or destroyed in pounds. Most are sold locally through newspaper ads - the responsibility ends when the purchaser's taillights disappear from sight. Many backyard breeders do not have the knowledge to properly raise a healthy, socialized litter, or to help the new owner with any problems that might arise.

Backyard breeders may act on a desire to make extra money, or simply out of ignorance. Sometimes back yard breeders will breed so "their children can experience the miracle of birth", or they mistakenly believe "every dog should have one litter." They may think their dog is so cute, he/she would make wonderful puppies, with little or no thought for the homes to which their puppies will go. Other back yard breeders see how much money legitimate breeders charge for pups and figure they could make some "easy money" too. Or, a back yard breeder may have a completely unplanned litter by accident.

Backyard breeders usually bring two breeding animals together regardless of their quality. They are not interested in scientific breeding. Their aim is to fulfill a personal need or goal, not to improve the breed and bring excellent quality dogs to the world. Since breed excellence is generally unimportant, the breeding dogs generally will not have been tested for genetic and health problems.

Backyard breeders are not necessarily bad people, they often come from middle to upper income families, and their dogs can be well loved and kept. However, getting a pup from a back yard breeder is a gamble:

* the parents likely have not been screened for health problems
* puppies usually are not sold with contracts
* the breeders are not in it for the long haul. They will be working on new personal objectives in five years when your pet has a problem and you need help.

Although you might pay less for the breed of your choice from a pet store or backyard breeder, it's almost a given that in the long run, you'll pay a good deal more in vet bills and perhaps emotional bills (if the dog has to be euthanized due to a health or temperament problem), than you would from a reputable breeder.

Before we decide to breed our dogs, THINK. Ask yourself what the purpose of this litter really is. >>




 
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