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Hi ya. To be honest, with something like a potential Bloat situation I'd need A VET. I had such an event with Frankie last weekend (always on a Sunday and during the evening!). I got him in pdq and intubation was attempted, to no avail. He got in but nothing came out. I watched him and it was similar to tube-feeding a puppy .... measuring the distance from mouth to stomach, marking it on the tube etc. X-rays thankfully showed no torsion (which would have made any attempt to put a tube in impossible in any case) and what was there was food - not gas. He was kept in overnight on an I/V drip (which after 36 hours, he managed to drag out). He was in for 2 nights and came home on Tuesday morning with an £800+ bill. In the end it was thought he had picked up some bug (perhaps salmonella from the garden birds.. he loiters under the feeders which are now blocked off) which shut down the digestive process.



I guess something is better than nothing re that package but with GDV, you do need a vet, because that usually means x-ray to confirm torsion, and surgery. Which thankfully we avoided.
 

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stick a tube down the throat of a dog with a twist stomach is IMHO not a good idea. Without x-ray etc can do more harm than good.


Second time today I agree with franksmon
 

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I would NEVER, EVER attempt to do this as a FIRST option. When we had Ester bloat, we were at home only 10 min from the e vet. He said that if we had been an hour away, she would be dead. She did have her stomach twist, so this probably would not have saved her as when the twist happens, the blood vessels are cut off and gangrene sets in.
They kept Ester on the table over an hour to make sure all the tissue went pink again so they wouldn't have to remove any which he said they sometimes do, and the dog survives.
But, I think this might work to buy time to get to the vet. If we had been up north, the nearest vet is not an e vet, and they are over an hour away...the e vet is 2-3 hours.....desperate times call for desperate measures I think.
 

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stick a tube down the throat of a dog with a twist stomach is IMHO not a good idea.

OK. Bearing in mind we have had 4 GDV cases, not all with the same vet although 3 were, in EACH CASE, intubation was attempted but in each case this proved impossible and suggested there was torsion, as proved by immediate subsequent x-ray. There was NO FORCING involved with the attempt at intubation. That would be RIDICULOUS!! It's normally the first option IF there is gas involved and there is no twist, so the tube can go into the stomach.


There was NO 'sticking the tube down the throat' going on :rolleyes:


Our last, of the 4 cases we had, did indeed suffer a ruptured spleen during the twist and that had to be removed.



Frankie had no torsion, and it was food in there, not gas.
 

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OK....Sorry I posted it, it seems to be a bad idea....Collies must be different

Don't be sorry .... it's of interest, but again I think any such involvement should be done only by a qualified vet. But again, something may well be better than nothing, when out of close reach of a vet. If there is ever an emergency for any dog, it's GDV - bloat WITH torsion. Sometimes, and I've done this, it is possible to 'walk off' a bloat that 's just that - no torsion.


My comment above was made because I thought what my vet(s) did with the tube, was being criticised. Apologies for that reaction!
 

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My comment above was made because I thought what my vet(s) did with the tube, was being criticised


What was being criticized is a lay person attempting a veterinary procedure. Which this bloat kit requires.
 

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I don't think it's a bad idea.

My old vet actually suggested it at one point because I lived pretty far out - she was 20 min away, and the e-vet was an hour away. Obviously if possible you should simply rush as fast as you can to the nearest vet and don't bother mucking around. But sometimes that's not possible, or the vet is too far, in which case a bloat kit *might* save your dog's life - assuming you know how to use it correctly.
 

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- assuming you know how to use it correctly.

This is the crux of the situation! I'd suggest it might help if the lay person knows how to tube-feed puppies!!


"What was being criticized is a lay person attempting a veterinary procedure. Which this bloat kit requires."


Again, I reacted because I felt the comment was aimed at what my vet(s) did with a bloat situation. Again apoligies ;)
 
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